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Back Pain In Diabetics

Mapping The Association Between Back Pain And Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-sectional And Longitudinal Study Of Adult Spanish Twins

Mapping The Association Between Back Pain And Type 2 Diabetes: A Cross-sectional And Longitudinal Study Of Adult Spanish Twins

Abstract Back pain and type 2 diabetes often co-occur, resulting in greater impact on people’s health and complexity in their care. Plausible causal mechanisms for this association have been proposed, yet the nature of the link remains unclear. We therefore explored the direction of the association between type 2 diabetes and chronic back pain in twins, controlling for genetics and early environmental confounding. 2,096 and 1,098 twins were included in the cross-sectional and longitudinal analyses, respectively. Any or severe (≥ 9) low back pain (LBP), neck pain (NP), and spinal pain (concurrent LBP and NP) and type 2 diabetes were investigated. Sequential analyses were performed using logistic regression. Firstly, twins were analysed unpaired (adjusted age and gender): total sample analyses. Then, to control for genetic and shared environmental factors, a co-twin case-control analysis was performed including monozygotic and dizygotic twin pairs discordant for back pain (cross-sectional only). In the cross-sectional total sample analyses, type 2 diabetes was associated with chronic spinal pain (OR 1.61; 95%CI 1.12 to 2.31), severe chronic spinal pain (OR 3.33; 95%CI 1.47 to 7.53), chronic NP (OR 1.37; 95%CI 1.01 to 1.85), severe chronic NP (OR 2.28; 95%CI 1.24 to 4.21), and severe chronic LBP (OR 1.63; 95%CI 1.00 to 2.64). After further adjustment for genetic and shared environmental factors, none of the associations remained significant. The longitudinal analyses indicated that the presence of type 2 diabetes did not increase the risk of future back pain, or vice-versa, after two to four years. Chronic back pain (spinal pain, NP, or LBP) was associated with the prevalence of type 2 diabetes. Associations are stronger for severe cases of pain. Future research should Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Back Pain: Markers Of Diabetes Disease Progression Are Associated With Chronic Back Pain

Diabetes And Back Pain: Markers Of Diabetes Disease Progression Are Associated With Chronic Back Pain

IN BRIEF Diabetes has been associated with the incidence of back pain. However, the relationship between markers of diabetes progression and back pain has not been studied. The objective of this study was to correlate clinical and laboratory measures of diabetes disease severity to the presence of back pain to provide insight into the relationship between these conditions. Findings showed that markers of diabetes disease progression were associated with the presence of back pain, suggesting that uncontrolled diabetes may contribute to the development of chronic back pain. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. See for details. Continue reading >>

Mindfulness And Back Pain

Mindfulness And Back Pain

Tweet People with diabetes often report symptoms of neuropathy which can affect up to 50% of people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes. Symptoms include numbness or pain in: Arms Hands Legs Feet Neuropathy can also affect the organs, including the heart and sex organs. Back pain is also suffered at a greater rate in diabetes; it could be an added symptom of neuropathy or could be an indication of kidney problems or urinary tract infections. A consultation with a doctor and a simple blood test can help eliminate possible causes of back pain. Mindfulness found to reduce back pain Mindfulness meditation has been reported in numerous scientific investigations to have a positive influence on pain management, in general and chronic back pain in particular. One study conducted in 2008 reported that after an 8 week mindfulness based pain management course, people meditated on average 4.3 days a week for approximately 31.6 minutes per session. They reported on a Chronic Pain Acceptance Questionnaire that their pain management had improved and were better able to accept and function with the level of pain they were experiencing. [42] Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood glucose levels) due to the body: Being ineffective at using the insulin it has produced; also known as insulin resistance and/or Being unable to produce enough insulin Type 2 diabetes is characterised by the body being unable to metabolise glucose (a simple sugar). This leads to high levels of blood glucose which over time may damage the organs of the body. From this, it can be understood that for someone with diabetes something that is food for ordinary people can become a sort of metabolic poison. This is why people with diabetes are advised to avoid sourc Continue reading >>

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

6 Emergency Complications Of Type 2 Diabetes

People with type 2 diabetes are at increased risk of many serious health problems, including heart attack, stroke, vision loss, and amputation. But by keeping your diabetes in check — that means maintaining good blood sugar control — and knowing how to recognize a problem and what to do about it should one occur, you can prevent many of these serious complications of diabetes. Heart Attack Heart disease and stroke are the top causes of death and disability in people with diabetes. Heart attack symptoms may appear suddenly or be subtle, with only mild pain and discomfort. If you experience any of the following heart attack warning signs, call 911 immediately: Chest discomfort that feels like pressure, squeezing, fullness, or pain in the center of your chest, lasting for a short time or going away and returning Pain elsewhere, including the back, jaw, stomach, or neck; or pain in one or both arms Shortness of breath Nausea or lightheadedness Stroke If you suddenly experience any of the following stroke symptoms, call 911 immediately. As with a heart attack, immediate treatment can be the difference between life and death. Stroke warning signs may include: Sudden numbness or weakness in the face, arm, or leg, especially if it occurs on one side of the body Feeling confused Difficulty walking and talking and lacking coordination Developing a severe headache for no apparent reason Nerve Damage People with diabetes are at increased risk of nerve damage, or diabetic neuropathy, due to uncontrolled high blood sugar. Nerve damage associated with type 2 diabetes can cause a loss of feeling in your feet, which makes you more vulnerable to injury and infection. You may get a blister or cut on your foot that you don't feel and, unless you check your feet regularly, an infection Continue reading >>

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Low Back Pain At Presentation In A Newly Diagnosed Diabetic

Patients with insulin dependent diabetes mellitus (IDDM) are generally more susceptible to infections, which can cause hyperglycaemia and trigger diabetic ketoacidosis.1 In many cases, the focus of infection, such as the urinary or respiratory tract, may be apparent at presentation. Occasionally, however, patients can present with unusual foci of infection and vague clinical symptoms and signs. Both epidural2–5 and psoas6,7 abscesses have been reported in diabetics, but mainly in adults with longstanding disease. Presentation with an epidural abscess and psoas abscess in the same patient is extremely rare in adults, particularly at first presentation of IDDM,2 and, to our knowledge, has not been reported in children. CASE REPORT A 12 year old boy of mixed race (White/Afro-Caribbean) presented to casualty with a three day history of central abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, and low back pain, followed by a five hour history of difficulty in breathing. There was no previous history of respiratory problems, polyuria, polydipsia, or weight loss. His past medical history was unremarkable with normal development and no previous acute hospital admissions. On examination, he was 10% dehydrated with cold peripheries, dry mucous membranes, sunken eyes, and reduced skin turgor. He had Kussmaul breathing, with a respiratory rate of 60 breaths per minute, but good bilateral air entry on auscultation and no wheeze or crackles. There was no lymphadenopathy but he was noted to be anaemic. Axillary temperature was 36.0°C on admission. His heart rate was regular at 120 per minute with a blood pressure of 130/70 mm Hg. He had mild central abdominal pain with no hepatosplenomegaly. Examination of the spine revealed mild tenderness on palpation over the upper lumbar spine, but peripher Continue reading >>

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease Of Diabetes

Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts* *Kidney Disease of Diabetes Facts Medically Edited by: Melissa Conrad Stöppler, MD Type 2 Diabetes Diagnosis, Treatment, Medication Medical Author: Melissa Conrad Stoppler, MD Medical Editor: Ruchi Mathur, MD, FRCP(C) Proper nutrition is essential for anyone living with diabetes. Control of blood glucose levels is only one goal of a healthy eating plan for people with diabetes. A diet for those with diabetes should also help achieve and maintain a normal body weight as well as prevent heart and vascular disease, which are frequent complications of diabetes. There is no prescribed diet plan for those with diabetes. Rather, eating plans are tailored to fit an individual's needs, schedules, and eating habits. A diabetes diet plan must also be balanced with the intake of insulin and oral diabetes medications. In general, the principles of a healthy diabetes diet are the same for everyone. Consumption of a variety of foods including whole grains, fruits, non-fat dairy products, beans, and lean meats or vegetarian substitutes, poultry and fish is recommended to achieve a healthy diet. Each year in the United States, more than 100,000 people are diagnosed with kidney failure, a serious condition in which the kidneys fail to rid the body of wastes. Kidney failure is the final stage of chronic kidney disease (CKD). Diabetes is the most common cause of kidney failure, accounting for nearly 44 percent of new cases. Even when diabetes is controlled, the disease can lead to chronic kidney disease and kidney failure. Most people with diabetes do not develop chronic kidney disease that is severe enough to progress to kidney failure. Nearly 24 million people in the United States have diabetes, and nearly 200,000 people are living with kidney failure a Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can Diabetes Cause Fatigue, Body Ache?

Can diabetes be a (possible) cause of fatigue, leg and lower back aches? I have had bursts of energy for 10 to 15 minutes, but then need to sit for about 10 minutes, and I'm ready to go full steam again. PLEASE, Thank You, Mike Dear Mike: Thanks for an important question, as a lot of people with diabetes complain of these symptoms. The answer is that diabetes itself probably is not the cause of your fatigue, lower back and leg aches. The things that cause type 2 diabetes (also called adult onset diabetes), such as a weight problem and lack of exercise, are commonly the cause these symptoms. Fatigue incorporates three components: 1. The inability to initiate activity. 2. Reduced ability to maintain activity. 3. Difficulty with concentration and memory. Fatigue should be distinguished from sleepiness, shortness of breath on exertion and muscle weakness, although these can also be associated with fatigue. Fatigue lasting six months or more is referred to as chronic fatigue. Chronic fatigue is not necessarily the entity known as chronic fatigue syndrome, which is a diagnosis after exclusion of all other causes. Fatigue in anyone should be evaluated by a health care provider to exclude all possible causes and to get counseling on how to treat it. Other medical causes of fatigue are the side effect of drugs, thyroid dysfunction, high calcium levels, rheumatologic illnesses, adrenal, kidney or liver problems. Some infections such as tuberculosis or hepatitis can cause fatigue, and indeed, fatigue can be their only symptom. Depression is also a major cause of fatigue. While unusual, uncontrolled diabetes can be the cause of fatigue. These patients generally also have other symptoms of diabetes such as excess thirst, frequent urination and blurred vision. Some drugs used to trea Continue reading >>

The Spine In Diabetes

The Spine In Diabetes

Rowan Hillson January 31, 2018 Vol 35.1 January / February 2018 Do you have back ache? Over a year 1520% of adults will have back pain, and during their lifetime 5080% will have at least one episode of back pain.1 In 2014 the Global Burden of Disease Study concluded that low back pain causes more global disability than any other condition.2 The musculoskeletal complications of diabetes get much less attention than micro- or macrovascular disease. Yet they may trouble patients more in their daily lives. There seem to be few studies of back pain in diabetes. Among 5106 people in the NHANES study, 515 had diabetes among whom the prevalence of chronic low back pain was 19.8% vs 12.9% in those without diabetes (age-adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.46; 95% CI 1.001.94). Correcting for the older age, greater obesity, lower educational levels, lower income, past smoking and reduced activity of those with diabetes still showed the increased prevalence OR 1.39; 1.021.92.3 Hidden among the thousands of patients with back pain are some with uncommon but potentially life-changing conditions. People with diabetes have a greater risk of spinal infections than the general population. Suspect spinal infection if your patient has new or worsening back pain and any of these features: fever, IV access or haemodialysis, recent bacteraemia, endocarditis, IV drug abuse, or new neurological deficits.4 A 12-year-old boy had three days of central abdominal pain, vomiting, lethargy, and low back pain. He had mild lumbar spinal tenderness. Investigations revealed new diabetes with ketoacidosis which was treated. He developed widespread left-sided abdominal and flank pain with lower back and bilateral buttock pain, gradually including the left anterior thigh. MRI showed a 20cm epidural abscess from T10/ Continue reading >>

Diabetes-related Nerve Problems

Diabetes-related Nerve Problems

Neuropathy, a common complication of diabetes, is damage to the nerves that allow you to feel sensations such as pain. There are a number of ways that diabetes damages the nerves, and they are all linked to blood glucose (sugar) being too high for a long period of time. Diabetes-related nerve damage can be painful, but it isn't severe in most cases. There are two major types of diabetic neuropathy: peripheral and autonomic. The areas of the body most commonly affected by peripheral neuropathy are the feet and legs. Nerve damage in the feet can result in a loss of foot sensation, increasing your risk of foot problems like ulcers. Therefore, proper skin and foot care should be practiced. Rarely, the arms, abdomen, and back may be affected. Symptoms of peripheral neuropathy may include: Tingling Numbness (severe or long-term numbness can become permanent) Burning Pain In many cases, symptoms will improve when blood glucose is controlled. To help prevent peripheral neuropathy: Check your feet and legs daily -- look for blisters, calluses, and cuts. Apply lotion if your feet are dry, but avoid getting lotion in between your toes; this area should be kept dry. Care for your nails regularly (go to a podiatrist if necessary). Wear properly fitting footwear. Some people with bony abnormalities may require custom shoes to redistribute pressure. People with claudication may require a referral to a doctor or surgeon who specializes in poor circulation. If you smoke, quit. Autonomic neuropathy most often affects the digestive system, especially the stomach, blood vessels, urinary system, and sex organs. To prevent autonomic neuropathy, you need to continuously keep your blood glucose levels well controlled. Symptoms of neuropathy of the digestive system may include: Feeling full aft Continue reading >>

Managing Chronic Pain

Managing Chronic Pain

Pain affects millions of people with diabetes. For most of these people, the pain is chronic, defined as pain persisting for more than six months, experienced almost every day, and of moderate to severe intensity, or that significantly interferes with daily activities. In some cases, a person’s pain is clearly related to complications of diabetes; in other cases, it is not. Regardless of the cause, however, studies show that chronic pain makes diabetes self-management much more difficult and often leads to higher blood glucose levels. Surveys of people with diabetes report rates of chronic pain anywhere from 20% to over 60% – much higher than rates in the general population. The types of pain most often reported by people with diabetes include back pain and neuropathy pain in the feet or hands. (Peripheral neuropathy, or nerve damage in the feet and hands, is a common complication of diabetes.) Headaches and other pain sites are also frequently reported. Many people with diabetes also have arthritis, fibromyalgia (an arthritis-related illness that causes widespread muscle and joint pain and fatigue), or other painful conditions. Pain has been shown to interfere with self-management activities, sleep, physical functioning, work, family relationships, mood, and quality of life. To make matters worse, pain is often invisible to others, so family members, coworkers, and health-care professionals often have no idea what a person in pain is going through. Many people feel that their physicians don’t understand and tell them they “just have to live with it.” Why is there so much pain, and what can be done about it? Acute versus chronic pain When speaking of pain, it’s important to understand the difference between acute and chronic pain. Acute pain is what a person Continue reading >>

Diabetes Back Pain

Diabetes Back Pain

Diabetes back pain is always a possible source of symptoms for patients who suffer from chronic blood sugar concerns. Diabetes is a major health threat which has reached stellar proportions in the developed world, mostly due to a less active lifestyle combined with a fatty diet. Obesity is the major cause for most adult diabetes and that is a shame, since the condition is completely preventable with a bit of education and effort. Unfortunately, once most patients realize the danger of their lifestyle choices, it is far too late. Many doctors cite diabetes as one of the most significant health threats of our time, with more and more cases being diagnosed every year. Diabetes Back Pain Information 1 1 Trick to Calm Nerves Escape neuropathy symptoms fast Soothe nerves with this quick trick nervestra.com 2 Sciatica Pain Relief Act Now. IntelliSpine℠: More Precise, Faster Recovery. Medicare Not Accepted. NorthAmericanSpine.com Diabetes causes nerve pain due to increased glucose in the blood. The presence of high glucose levels attack the structural integrity of nerves, causing a frightening variety of possible symptoms including weakness, tingling, numbness and of course, pain. The majority of diabetic sufferers experience these painful issues in their extremities, in either the hands or feet. However, symptoms can exist virtually anywhere and cause truly nightmarish conditions for some patients to bear. The technical medical term for this health issue is diabetic neuropathy, but most patients simply call it what it feels like… Hell on Earth! Worse still, these types of pain conditions are notoriously difficult to treat, since they tend to resist many pharmaceutical products and do not respond to surgery. Diabetes Back Pain Concerns Diabetes usually attacks peripheral ne Continue reading >>

Chronic Low-back Pain In Adult With Diabetes: Nhanes 2009–2010

Chronic Low-back Pain In Adult With Diabetes: Nhanes 2009–2010

Abstract The aim of this study was to test the hypothesis that diabetes mellitus (DM) is associated with an increased prevalence of chronic low back pain (CLBP) in the general population. We analyzed data for 5106 adults (4591 without DM & 515 with diagnosed DM), who were part of the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES) from 2009 through 2010. Adults with DM were older (mean age 54.2 years' vs. 42.1 years), more likely to be obese (BMI > 30, 69.5% vs. 33.3%), less educated (college or above 44.4% vs. 57.3%), had a lower annual income (<$20,000, 16.8% vs. 13.4%), were more likely to be a former smoker (31.5% vs. 20.9%), less physically active (43.5% vs. 59.4%). The prevalence of CLBP was 19.8% in adults with DM vs. 12.9% in adults without DM (age-adjusted OR 1.46; 95% CI, 1.00–1.94, P = .050). After the adjustments for CLBP's known risk factors, the association remained significant (OR 1.39; 95% CI, 1.02–1.92, P = .041). Adults with DM have a higher prevalence of CLBP. Further research is needed to examine the association and pathophysiology of DM and CLBP as well as the role of shared risk factors. Continue reading >>

How To Handle Back Pain When You Have Diabetes

How To Handle Back Pain When You Have Diabetes

Back pain is a problem that affects many people including those with diabetes. Often people with diabetes have other conditions that could cause back pain, such as arthritis, fibromyalgia or kidney problems. Discover how to handle back pain when you have diabetes. More than half of people with diabetes report they have chronic pain. The most common types of chronic pain are back pain and pain in the feet or hands as a result of neuropathy. Chronic pain can make it more difficult to handle diabetes self-management activities and may lead to elevated blood sugar levels. It is important to deal with back pain so it does not have a negative impact on your ability to sleep, work, function physically and have positive relationships. There are ways to relieve pain, improve your mood and enjoy a better quality of life: The first step is to discuss back pain with your doctor. Learn the difference between acute and chronic pain. Acute pain is a reaction to an injury. This is what we feel when we touch the hot stove, realized we are burned and seek immediate help. Chronic pain might start with an acute injury but remain long after that initial problem. It can be related to irritation or inflammation, which is often associated with diabetes. Factors such as fear, stress, anger and trauma can lead to chronic pain. If left untreated, pain can lead to sleeplessness, tension, depression and anger. All of these emotions can contribute to chronic back pain. Your health care team can help determine whether the pain is caused by physical, emotional and/or mental factors to figure out the best way to treat it. There are a variety of physical treatments that can relieve chronic back pain. This might include applying heat or cold to the area. Massage is a good way to relieve the symptoms of p Continue reading >>

Diabetic Neuropathy

Diabetic Neuropathy

Print Overview Diabetic neuropathy is a type of nerve damage that can occur if you have diabetes. High blood sugar (glucose) can injure nerve fibers throughout your body, but diabetic neuropathy most often damages nerves in your legs and feet. Depending on the affected nerves, symptoms of diabetic neuropathy can range from pain and numbness in your extremities to problems with your digestive system, urinary tract, blood vessels and heart. For some people, these symptoms are mild; for others, diabetic neuropathy can be painful, disabling and even fatal. Diabetic neuropathy is a common serious complication of diabetes. Yet you can often prevent diabetic neuropathy or slow its progress with tight blood sugar control and a healthy lifestyle. Symptoms There are four main types of diabetic neuropathy. You may have just one type or symptoms of several types. Most develop gradually, and you may not notice problems until considerable damage has occurred. The signs and symptoms of diabetic neuropathy vary, depending on the type of neuropathy and which nerves are affected. Peripheral neuropathy Peripheral neuropathy is the most common form of diabetic neuropathy. Your feet and legs are often affected first, followed by your hands and arms. Signs and symptoms of peripheral neuropathy are often worse at night, and may include: Numbness or reduced ability to feel pain or temperature changes A tingling or burning sensation Sharp pains or cramps Increased sensitivity to touch — for some people, even the weight of a bed sheet can be agonizing Muscle weakness Loss of reflexes, especially in the ankle Loss of balance and coordination Serious foot problems, such as ulcers, infections, deformities, and bone and joint pain Autonomic neuropathy The autonomic nervous system controls your hea Continue reading >>

Low Back Pain In Diabetes Mellitus And Importance Of Preventive Approach

Low Back Pain In Diabetes Mellitus And Importance Of Preventive Approach

Go to: Background: Musculoskeletal pain is known to be a common problem in diabetic patients. In spite of this fact, there is little information about epidemiology aspect of Low Back Pain (LBP) and necessity of taking preventive approach in diabetic patients. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of LBP in diabetic patients and its comparison with non-diabetic subjects. Methods: Low back pain frequency was examined among 317 diabetic patients referred to endocrine clinic, Sina Hospital, Tabriz city, Iran during 3 months interval. The control group included 100 participants who were parents of students of Tabriz University. All participants were asked to fill out a questionnaire including Roland Morris Disability Questionnaire (RMDQ) and Face Pain Scale (FPS). Result: Of the 317 diabetic patients, 63.4% (201) reported LBP while in non-diabetic group was 47% (47).The average functional disability in diabetic group was 9 while in control group was 7. Inter-correlation between low back pain intensity scale and functional disability were significant (r=0.52, P<0.01). Discussion: Low back pain is a common problem in diabetic patients in terms of intensity, frequency and functional level of disability. Keywords: Low back pain, Diabetes mellitus, Disability Continue reading >>

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