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Baby Reaction To Glucose Test

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

Glucose Tolerance Test (gtt)

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test (GTT) diagnoses diabetes in pregnancy by checking how well your body regulates your blood sugar levels. Gestational diabetes, or GD, is a common pregnancy complication. It's thought to affect one pregnant woman in six. Although GD is common, testing for it is not routine. Your midwife will offer you the test only if she thinks there's a chance you could develop GD. Usually, you'll have the test when you’re between 24 weeks and 28 weeks pregnant. You could have the test earlier than this, usually at 16 weeks, depending on your medical history and where you live in the UK. For example, your midwife will offer the GTT sooner if you’ve had GD before. Why do I need a GTT? GD doesn’t often cause obvious symptoms, which is why testing is important. If GD isn’t recognised and treated it may put your health and your baby's health at risk. GD happens when your body fails to make enough insulin. Insulin is a hormone that keeps your blood sugar levels stable. It also helps your body to store sugar for when you need it later. During pregnancy, your body has to produce extra insulin to meet your baby’s needs, especially when he's growing rapidly. If your body can't make enough insulin, you may end up with too much sugar in your blood, resulting in GD. Having too much sugar in your blood may mean that your baby grows large. This increases your chances of having an induced labour, and a caesarean birth. GD, especially if it's not controlled, even raises the risk of a baby being stillborn. That's why it's so important to follow the advice of your midwife or doctor if you're diagnosed with GD. Am I at risk of developing GD? You’re more likely to develop GD if: Your body mass index (BMI) is 30 or above. You have previo Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

Gestational Diabetes: Please Don’t Drink The “glucola” Without Reading The Label

I’m a midwife and MD who specializes in the health and wellness of pregnant mommas. While I’m one of the original crunchy mamas, I got the science thing down tight in my medical training at Yale, so I can keep you informed on what’s safe, what’s not, and what are the best alternatives. This article, in which I take on the toxic ingredients in oral glucose test drinks, is the first in a 3-part series on gestational diabetes. If you’re pregnant, planning to be pregnant, or working with pregnant mommas – this series is for you! Is Gestational Diabetes Really an Issue? In the past decade obesity has become rampant in our country. With it the rates of diabetes in the general population, and gestational diabetes (GDM) – which is an excessive increase in glucose intolerance in pregnancy (some increase in glucose intolerance is actually normal and allows more sugar to get to the baby for growth) – have risen dramatically. Current estimates are that 5%-7% of pregnant women in the U.S. develop GDM. Gestational diabetes increases the risk of a host of serious medical problems for mom and baby. However, at levels even lower than those that would qualify a woman for a GDM diagnosis, chronically elevated blood sugar also puts mom and baby at much higher risk of pregnancy and birth complications. Elevated blood sugar creates a condition in the body called “oxidative stress” and in pregnancy, which is already a state of somewhat increased oxidative stress, this can lead to high blood pressure, preeclampsia, and preterm birth. Also, babies born to overweight or diabetic moms have a much higher lifetime likelihood of developing chronic health problems associated with obesity and diabetes. Women who develop GDM also have at least a 50% change of becoming diabetic later Continue reading >>

Blood Test: Glucose

Blood Test: Glucose

A blood test is when a sample of blood is taken from the body to be tested in a lab. Doctors order blood tests to check things such as the levels of glucose, hemoglobin, or white blood cells. This can help them detect problems like a disease or medical condition. Sometimes, blood tests can help them see how well an organ (such as the liver or kidneys) is working. A glucose test measures how much glucose is in the blood. Glucose is a type of sugar used by the body for energy. A glucose test is done to check for low or high levels of glucose. Sometimes it's done as part of a routine checkup to screen for problems, and sometimes because a child has not been feeling well. A low glucose level is called hypoglycemia . A high level of glucose is called hyperglycemia . High glucose levels can point to diabetes . How Should We Prepare for a Glucose Test? Your child may be asked to stop eating and drinking for 8 to 12 hours before the test. Tell your doctor about any medicines your child takes because some drugs might affect the test results. Wearing a T-shirt or short-sleeved shirt for the test can make things easier for your child, and you also can bring along a toy or book as a distraction. Most blood tests take a small amount of blood from a vein. To do that, a health professional will: put an elastic band (tourniquet) above the area to get the veins to swell with blood insert a needle into a vein (usually in the arm inside of the elbow or on the back of the hand) pull the blood sample into a vial or syringe take off the elastic band and remove the needle from the vein In babies, blood draws are sometimes done as a "heel stick collection." After cleaning the area, the health professional will prick your baby's heel with a tiny needle (or lancet) to collect a small sample of Continue reading >>

Is The Glucose Test During Pregnancy Optional?

Is The Glucose Test During Pregnancy Optional?

Doctors recommend having a glucose test for gestational diabetes, but it's not mandatory. Here's what you need to know to make an informed choice. It’s an appointment on the calendar most pregnant women dread: the glucose test (or oral glucose screening), usually scheduled around week 26 to week 28 of pregnancy. You’ve no doubt seen many Instagram or Facebook pics posted by women tasked with drinking the super-sweet, typically orange liquid to gauge their body’s ability to handle glucose. This test is one of the ways to screen for gestational diabetes, a temporary form of diabetes that occurs only in pregnancy and typically resolves after delivery. The mama-to-be drinks the juice, hangs out for an hour in the waiting room, and then has blood taken to measure her glucose levels. (Ask your doctor, midwife or blood lab if you should fast beforehand or not—it can vary by clinic.) Your care provider may also specify a time constraint, like drinking the whole bottle in three to five minutes. A reading higher than 7.7 millimoles/L on the gestational diabetes chart calls for further follow-up testing, often called the glucose tolerance test. A reading higher than 11.1 millimoles/L likely means a gestational diabetes diagnosis. When I was expecting my second baby, the nurse at my bloodwork clinic told me there are two kinds of women when it comes to the glucose test: chuggers and sippers. I was totally a chugger. I downed that syrupy drink in just a few mouthfuls, to get the test over with as soon as possible. But a couple of days later, the doctor’s office called me back. There had been an error at the lab. I had to do the test again. I chugged the second time, too, eager to get back to work. That time my results were borderline, just a hair above acceptable levels, a Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test

Glucose Tolerance Test

What is a glucose tolerance test? A glucose tolerance test measures how well your body’s cells are able to absorb glucose, or sugar, after you ingest a given amount of sugar. Doctors use fasting blood sugar levels and hemoglobin A1c values to diagnose type 1 and type 2 diabetes, and prediabetes. A glucose tolerance test can also be used. Doctors primarily use a glucose tolerance test to diagnose gestational diabetes. Doctors often diagnose type 1 diabetes quickly because it usually develops quickly and involves high blood sugar levels. Type 2 diabetes, on the other hand, often develops over years. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes, and it usually develops during adulthood. Gestational diabetes occurs when a pregnant woman who doesn’t have diabetes before pregnancy has high blood sugar levels as a result of the pregnancy. The American Diabetes Association estimates that gestational diabetes occurs in 9.2 percent of pregnancies. Doctors should screen all women for gestational diabetes. Gestational diabetes can cause pregnancy complications, so early detection and prompt treatment are important. If you’re pregnant, your doctor will usually recommend this test between the 24th and 28th week of your pregnancy. Your doctor may also recommend that you have this test earlier if you’re having the symptoms of prediabetes or diabetes. Preparing for the glucose tolerance test involves the following: Continue to eat a normal diet in the days leading up to the test. Consult with your doctor about any medications you’re currently taking. Some medications, such as corticosteroids, beta-blockers, diuretics, and antidepressants, can interfere with the results. Abstain from food for at least eight hours before the scheduled test. You may drink water, but avoid Continue reading >>

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

Think Before You Drink: A Closer Look At Glucola

. . . and don’t forget those vegetables. Healthy fats are essential, of course, and don’t skip meals! You dutifully nod your head, and then look down at the bottle of glucola that’s just been handed to you. All of a sudden you’re in a “choose your own adventure” story. Which path will you take? What are the risks and benefits of this test? Today I’m going to share my personal process in deciding whether or to take the oral glucose challenge test (OGCT). Please keep in mind that as I wrote in my posts on the vitamin K shot and Group B Strep, “Best Boo-Boo Kisser South Of Puckett’s Gas Station” is about as official as things get for me professionally. I am not a doctor, this is not medical advice, and your decision is completely up to you. If you need some convincing on this, read my full disclaimer where I say it over and over again. Okay, let’s jump in! What is gestational diabetes? Most doctors say we don’t really know why gestational diabetes happens, but there is a theory out there that makes a lot of sense to me personally, and it’s this: Before modern conveniences like grocery stores, people ate what grew in their backyard. Our ancestors’ staples were sometimes starch heavy (like the maca root consumed by Peruvians), and other times they were more fat and protein-based (like the Inuit). Our bodies do an amazing job adapting to whatever’s available, but there are certain things we all need to thrive. Glucose is a particularly essential nutrient for babies, but in some regions it can be scarce. According to this theory, our bodies adapted to the risk of scarcity by giving our babies preferential access to it during pregnancy. How does that work? As Chris Kresser has observed, “Pregnant women are naturally insulin resistant.” In other Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

Glucose Tolerance Test - And What The Results Mean

If you've been told you've got to have a GTT, here's what you need to do, what to expect on the day and how this could indicate gestational diabetes The Glucose Tolerance Test (aka the GTT - not to be mixed up with a G&T) is a test carried out during pregnancy to detect whether you may have Gestational Diabetes (GD). No, not everyone who's pregnant has one. You'll only be offered one if your midwife thinks there's a likelihood you could develop Gestational Diabetes during your pregnancy. "Not every hospital routinely carries out glucose tolerance tests," says independent midwife Pam Wild, "but you can ask for one if you are worried and you think you need to be tested." While most tests are carried out between 26 and 28 weeks, sometimes you may be given the test around 16 weeks, depending on your medical history. Main reasons your midwife or GP will recommend you take a Glucose Tolerance Test (GTT) are: you have previously had diabetes in pregnancy you have a history of diabetes in your immediate family if you have previously had a very big baby (4.5kg or heavier) if they have found sugar or ketones in your urine for pregnant women of certain ethnic origins (Black Caribbean, South Asian and Middle Eastern) if your BMI (body mass index) is 30 or above A glucose tolerance test (GTT) or oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT) measures your blood glucose levels. In the test, your blood is taken, and you're then given a glucose drink. After 2 hours your blood is taken again to see how quickly your body is able to clear the glucose from your blood. That gives an indication of whether you're showing signs of GD. How do I take a glucose tolerance test? Make sure you have a good meal as you'll have to fast from midnight and won't be able to eat anything until after the test - although Continue reading >>

Glucose Testing (twins)

Glucose Testing (twins)

Who Gets the Test? All women should get glucose testing during pregnancy. It's especially important if you're having twins, since your risk of developing diabetes is higher. What the Test Does Glucose testing is a way of checking for a type of diabetes that can start when you're pregnant. Gestational diabetes is common and treatable. It usually goes away after birth. Without treatment, it can cause problems during pregnancy. There are a few basic tests. The glucose challenge screening tests how your body is processing blood sugar. If the results are unusual, you will get a follow-up test. It's called a glucose tolerance test. If that's positive, you'll get treatment to get your glucose under control and keep your babies healthy. Some women get a blood test to check glucose called the A1C. How the Test Is Done Glucose tests are harmless to you and your babies. During the glucose challenge screening, you'll drink a small amount of glucose. After an hour, a nurse or phlebotomist will take a blood sample. The follow-up glucose tolerance test is a little more complex. You'll have to adjust your diet for a few days. Then you'll fast for 8-14 hours before the test. A nurse will test your blood and then give you glucose. After that, the nurse or phlebotomist will take 3 more blood samples over the next few hours. The A1C test is a simple blood test to check long-term glucose levels. What to Know About Test Results If you do have a positive result, try not to worry too much. Diabetes during pregnancy is common, especially in women pregnant with twins. If you do have high glucose, your doctor may recommend extra testing to check on your babies. You will need to keep your blood sugar under control with diet, exercise, and sometimes medicine. Women who have gestational diabetes hav Continue reading >>

Checking Blood Glucose In Newborn Babies

Checking Blood Glucose In Newborn Babies

Healthy full-term babies do not need blood glucose checks. Blood glucose is checked with just a few drops of blood, usually taken from your baby’s heel. The most natural way to feed your baby and keep a normal blood glucose level is early and frequent breastfeeding. What is blood glucose? Blood glucose is a sugar that moves through the bloodstream and provides energy to all the cells in the body. It is one of your baby’s most important sources of energy. Babies with normal blood glucose levels have all the energy they need for healthy growth and development. However, in rare cases, blood glucose levels can fall too low and cause a baby to become sick. Where do babies get glucose? Babies get glucose through the placenta and umbilical cord while in their mother’s uterus (womb). Some of that glucose is used right away as energy and some is stored for after birth. This stored glucose helps keep your baby’s levels normal for the first few days of life until she is feeding well. Once mom’s breast milk is established (usually by a baby’s third day of life), it becomes the main source of sugar for your baby. The sugar in milk changes to glucose in the body. When this happens, your baby will also start to store glucose for use between feeds. Why do some babies have low blood glucose? In healthy full-term babies (babies born after 37 weeks), blood glucose levels are at their lowest 1 to 2 hours after birth. After this, the levels usually start to rise as your baby’s body starts to use healthy sugar and fat stores. Small and preterm (early) babies may not have enough stores to keep the level up without extra feedings. These babies are most at risk for low blood glucose in the first 36 hours of life. Babies whose mothers have diabetes (especially mothers who need insu Continue reading >>

Crazy Baby After Glucose Test

Crazy Baby After Glucose Test

So I did the 1 hour glucose test today and holy cow is the baby ever active and I had the test done almost 12 hours ago. Its been wiggling and squirming all day actually starting to cause some what feels like are braxton hicks...anyone else experience this after their glucose test..yikes! I have my glucose test tomorrow. So I guess I'll find out if he gets a sugar rush, too. Keep you posted. good luck with the glucose test it really was not bad at all!! I was actually pretty thirsty when they gave me the drink so I actually kind of enjoyed it - tasted like orange crush! and another girl was doing it at the exact same time and they had us in a comfy room with comfy chairs so the time flew by!! I totally know what you mean! I had my 1 hour test on Dec 12. At 9:30 am I drank the drink and at 10:30 they took my blood and the whole time she was going CRAZY!!! I had a hodded sweatshirt on (which was still a little big) and I could see her moving through the sweatshirt! lol. Then I got home and tried to lay down cuz I was tired and my belly was twitching like crazy and bulging out all over the place from her moving and dancing... lol It was pretty funny! I know I was completely entertained yesterday watching the baby dance around.But nearing the 10 hour mark it started to get uncomfortable so I got up and walked around..set up the xmas tree with my husband just trying to soothe the baby..it worked until I went to lay down at bed time and the baby thought it was play time haha. Today she is still a bit active but has settled down..tired from all the activity yesterday! My little girl was bouncing around for what seemed like forever after that test. I think it did take 12-15 hours for her to calm down. HAHA yeah Lilly slept great the next day after being worn out. lol. But she Continue reading >>

Anyone Refuse The 3 Hour Glucose Test - Pregnancy-info

Anyone Refuse The 3 Hour Glucose Test - Pregnancy-info

I just had my 1 hour glucose test today, and it came back a little high, so my doc has me scheduled to take the 3 hour. The thing is......I felt absolutely horrible for about 24 hours after doing the 1hour test. My stomach was aching really bad for the rest of the day, i even vomited! I am thinking about telling the doc I can't do the 3 hour test. Even if I were to show up with high numbers...all they are going to do is tell me to eat a different diet. The thing is......I already eat really healthy and walk 6 times/week. I am not overweight. There is nothing else i can do, and I do not want to subject me or my baby to a even stronger drink only to feel more sick. Is there anyone out there who has refused the test? I know you asked for others who had refused the tests to respond, and that's not me, but I feel compelled to write. Just because you eat a healthy diet and exercise does NOT mean that you won't have gestational diabetes, or that your baby will not suffer its effects if you do... and the effects can be very serious if it is not properly controlled. About half of the women who get GD do not have the risk factors such as obesity or family history, and to say that you aren't overweight, eat healthy, and exercise, implies blame on those women who do get GD, as if to say it is their fault because of lifestyle choices when in many cases this is not true. The hormones in the placenta are what cause the problems, and there is no way to predict how strongly your body will react to this insulin resistance, no matter how good the diet might be. Some women require insulin shots even though they watch their sugar/carb intake very closely. Diet alone does not always control GD, so don't a__sume that all that will be done is a diet plan. For most, this is true, but certainly Continue reading >>

The Dreaded Pregnancy Glucose Test

The Dreaded Pregnancy Glucose Test

For anyone that has never been pregnant, or never had to endure the overnight-fasting grump-fest that is a pregnancy glucose test, its not very fun. In fact, I hate it. Itdoesnt cause physical pain (aside from the needle pricks), and its not the kind of test you have tostudy for, but it still stinks nonetheless. If youre not sure what a pregnancy glucose test is, heres how it works: An expecting mother, around 28 weeks, fasts after the hour of midnight before her test. Some doctors offices dont even allow water after this time (like mine), in order to have a true fasting blood sugar level. Upon arriving at the office, shes given a high glucose sugary drink that must be consumed in 5 minutes. Then,exactlyone hour later, her blood is drawn and tested for the sugars. If her insulin has reacted properly, the blood sugar level should be within normal range. If the sugars are too high, the test is considered failed, and then she must undergo the THREE hour test (blood drawn four times over three hours, with the same drink consumed after the first blood draw). As you can imagine, for a lady thats overturning her amniotic fluid every 4 hours, and is hungryall the time, this is some kind of mild torture. The first time I ever had to do one of these tests was when I was pregnant with Red. I miserably failed the one hour test, even though I didnt feel hyped from the sugary drink. I came back for the 3hour test, but was dismissed at the second hour. What did I learn from that? I have a naturally delayed POWERHOUSE insulin reaction. At the second hour, my blood sugar was almost nothing. That explains why I get snack-y every few hours I have to graze to keep an even keel. But I was not a gestational diabetic. This time, with baby girl , I failed the one hour test again. And I HATE t Continue reading >>

Glucose Tolerance Test. What They Don't Warn You About!

Glucose Tolerance Test. What They Don't Warn You About!

Glucose Tolerance Test. What they don't warn you about! I had my GTT yesterday morning. The glucose stuff was yukky and NOT Lucozade like some ladies get. Anyway baby was bouncing around like a gymnast for quite a while yesterday and was active into the evening. Normally she's been waking me up around 5am jumping around. But this morning nothing. I rolled over into positions she really doesn't like me being in and normally goes crazy trying to get me to move. By this time I was really worried, so I got up and ready for work and had some cereal and a cup of tea. Still no movement. So I rang the hosptial and they asked me to come in. The midwife found her heartbeat straight away but still no movement. After a while baby woke up a bit and I felt a few small kicks. It turns out that some babies move around so much after all that glucose, that they tire themselves out and have a "down" day afterwards. It scared the living crap out of me. But always remember if you're worried, get it checked out. It's horrible stuff, but then I don't even like Lucazade. It must have been a worry with the baby not moving, I seem to remember something similar. We've just realised my partner can't get the morning off while I have my test so I need to rearrange it (I think chasing a toddler round the waiting room may affect the result). Am vaguely tempted to cancel as this is my 3rd pregnancy and I've never had any problems with blood sugar in pregnancy (my Mum is diabetic, hence the test) but I can't find any info on whether you should have it done every time. Does anyone know? i dont want mine done they say gotta have it done as lots of family history but having a section anyway wud it really matter I would def recommend you have it Ladies even if your BMI is normal and you dont have a family Continue reading >>

Blood Glucose Testing At Alternate Sites In Newborn Infants.

Blood Glucose Testing At Alternate Sites In Newborn Infants.

Blood glucose testing at alternate sites in newborn infants. Neonatal Unit, Karolinska University Hospital and Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden. [email protected] To compare a method of testing at alternate skin sites (AST) with that of the usual heel-stick approach (SM) for determining blood glucose levels in newborn infants. Our other aims were to compare these methods as regards their accuracy, the pain caused by the procedures, the times taken to obtain a result and the possible delay in accurate test results using AST during rapid changes in blood glucose. One hundred and eighty-six preterm and term infants were enrolled. The blood glucose levels were determined by a standard bedside method (SM, HemoCue) and AST (Freestyle), which permitted blood samples to be taken from the arm or leg. The levels of blood glucose ranged between 0.6 and 8.6 mmol/l. We found a significant correlation between SM and AST (r = 0.90, p < 0.001). The coefficient of variation was similar, pain was significantly less (median pain score 3.5 vs 7.5, p < 0.01) and the time taken to obtain a result significantly shorter (mean 35 vs 111 s, p < 0.01) with AST than with SM. No significant differences were found between these methods during rapid changes in the blood glucose levels. AST, a relatively simple and painless method of determining blood glucose levels in newborn infants, is acceptably accurate and causes minimal blood loss. Continue reading >>

Glucose Testing

Glucose Testing

All women should get glucose testing during pregnancy . It's a standard test. Glucose testing checks for a type of diabetes that can start when you're pregnant. Gestational diabetes is common and treatable. It usually goes away after birth. Without treatment, it can cause problems during pregnancy. There are few basic tests. The glucose challenge screening tests how your body is processing blood sugar . If the results are abnormal, you will get a follow-up test. It's called a glucose tolerance test. If that's positive, you'll get treatment to get your glucose under control and keep your baby healthy. Some women also get a blood test to check glucose called the A1C. Glucose tests are harmless to you and your baby. During the glucose challenge screening, you'll drink a small amount of glucose. After an hour, a nurse or phlebotomist will take a blood sample. For the follow-up glucose tolerance test, you'll have to adjust your diet for a few days. Then you'll fast for 8-14 hours before the test. A nurse or phlebotomist will test your blood and then give you glucose. After that, they will take three more blood samples over the next few hours. The A1C test is a simple blood test to check long-term glucose levels . If you do have a positive result, try not to worry too much. Diabetes during pregnancy is common. One out of five pregnant women gets it. Most have normal pregnancies and healthy babies. Your doctor may recommend extra testing to check on your baby. You will need to keep your blood sugar under control with diet, exercise , and sometimes medicine. Women who have gestational diabetes have an increased risk of developing diabetes later in life. How Often the Test Is Done During Your Pregnancy Women get glucose testing at 26 to 28 weeks. Some women also get testing for Continue reading >>

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