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Avocado Salad For Diabetics

Grilled Salmon And Avocado Salad

Grilled Salmon And Avocado Salad

This is a great seafood dish that will pair well with a small side of quinoa, or simply add on other nonstarchy vegetable like steamed green beans or cauliflower! Choices/Exchanges: 3 Lean protein, 3 Fat Budget Friendly Dinner Lunch Main Dish Salads Sides Vegetarian Lower Carb Veggie Rich Grilling Seafood frozen salmon filets (4-ounce each, thawed) grill seasoning (no-salt (Mrs. Dash Steak Grilling Blend)) Pat the thawed salmon filets dry with a paper towel. Brush each side with the olive oil and season with the no-salt grill seasoning. Grill the salmon filets on each side for 4-5 minutes, or until just cooked through. Set aside. Build each salad starting with 1 cup of Romaine lettuce, top with 1/4 of the sliced onion, 1/4 cup of the sliced cucumber, the grilled salmon filet and 1/4 of the sliced avocado, Repeat for remaining three salads. In a small bowl, whisk together the lime juice, olive oil, Dijon mustard, Stevia, salt and pepper. Drizzle the dressing over each salad. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

Diabetes Meal Plan Recipes

It's not always easy to follow your diabetes meal plan day after day, but these delicious recipes may help. Appetizer recipes Beverage recipes Bread recipes Breakfast recipes Dessert recipes Main dish recipes Salad recipes Sandwich recipes Sauce and dressing recipes Side dish recipes Soup recipes Vegetable recipes Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Over the years many people have come to fear avocados. I think this largely comes from the weight loss/ low fat industry pushing us not to eat fat because the common thinking is that we'll end up getting fat. Now I hear no end of people saying they avoid avocado, or left questioning is avocado good for diabetics? Well I hope this info helps to clear that up for you because avocado is one of the very best and healthiest foods we can all eat, diabetic or not. So let's dig in. So Is Avocado Good For Diabetics? As you most likely know, as a diabetic the macronutrient you most have to be concerned about is carbohydrates. But as dietitian Aglaee Jacob points out: “Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado”. What she means by available carbohydrates is that fiber does not affect blood sugar levels, only starch and sugar does. So when you subtract the amount of fiber in a food you are left with the net carbs, which is the net effect of that carbohydrate food. Sometimes it seems like a food has quite a bit of carbohydrate but once you minus the fiber you're left with very low ‘available carbohydrate content', just like the avocado in this instance. Avocado Is High In Monounsaturated Fat The fat found in avocado is 71% monounsaturated fat, 13% polyunsaturated, and 16% saturated fat. Monounsaturated fats provide diabetics with valuable health benefits: Eating a diet rich in monounsaturated fat from avocados helps to lower cholesterol and has a beneficial influence on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes Even after 7 days of eating a high avocado diet, total cholesterol level has been shown to decrease by 17% in hypercholesterolemia patients, 22% decrease in LD Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocados are growing in popularity. The creamy green fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, and heart-healthy fats . While they are high in fat, its the good kind of fat that benefits people with type 2 diabetes . If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity. Read on to learn more about the benefits of avocados for people with diabetes. Benefits of avocadofor people with type 2 diabetes Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. A recent study published in Nutrition Journal evaluated the effects of adding half an avocado to the standard lunch of healthy, overweight people. They discovered that avocados do not significantly impact blood sugar levels. Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fiber. Many other high-fiber foods may still spike blood sugar levels. One half of a small avocado, which is the standard amount people eat, contains about 5.9 grams of carbohydrate and 4.6 grams of fiber. According to the National Academies , the minimum recommended daily fiber intake for adults is: A 2012 review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine looked at the results of 15 studies involving fiber supplements (around 40 grams of fiber) for people with type 2 diabetes. They found that fiber supplements for type 2 diabetes can reduce fasting blood sugar levels and A1c levels . You dont need to take supplements to achieve these results. Instead, try eating a high-fiber diet. You can easily increase your fiber intake by eating more low-carb fruits, vegetables and plants, like avocados, leafy greens, berries, chia seeds, and nuts. H Continue reading >>

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

A friend of mine has been classified as pre-diabetic. The nurse has given her a diet sheet of a healthy diet for pre-diabetes and diabetics. On the sheet it mentions that avocados should be restricted. I believe that avocados do not spike blood sugar so what would be the reason behind its restriction? Does the nurse think it is unhealthy? Good because I told her to carry on eating as I felt avocados would be really good for her because of the fat content, vitamins and minerals. The diet sheet seemed confused about the message to present and it made it difficult for my friend to understand. I had a quick browse on the diabetes.co.uk website and everything seemed to be positive about eating avocados. In fact this link seems to be at odds with the NHS diabetes.co.uk/diet/nhs-die.... I have just read a booklet on Alzheimer's which unfortunately she is in the early stages. One of the foods that it suggests for brain health is avocados.To me it was a no brainer (excuse the pun) that avocado was indeed beneficial for her plus she enjoys eating them. Avocado is a great food to eat and I do believe your friend should continue eating them-- especially if she likes them and they are very healthy for anyone. I'm a type 1 diabetic and I have avocado on salads, on the side and with other meals. Great job! Quite often these kind of "guidelines" have 3 sections - 1. foods that are encouraged 2. foods that are forbidden and 3. foods that are "restricted" - restricted in this sense usually means allowed but limited in quantity. Avocados are good for you - but I suspect that "too many" avocados would not be good for you because of their fat content. It is "good fat" and we need fat in our diets - but there is a limit!! HI. I was diagnosed pre-diabetic at the end of August 2016. I joined t Continue reading >>

Black Bean And Edamame Avocado Salad

Black Bean And Edamame Avocado Salad

Ingredients 1/2 of a 15 oz (425 g) can black beans, rinsed and drained 1 cup (250 mL) fresh or frozen shelled edamame, thawed 1 medium yellow squash, diced 1 medium celery stalk, thinly sliced 2 Tbsp (30 mL) lime juice 1 Tbsp (15 mL) canola oil 1/2 tsp (2 mL) chopped fresh rosemary 1/4 tsp (1 mL) salt 1/4 tsp (1 mL) coarsely ground black pepper 1 ripe medium avocado, peeled, seeded and chopped Instructions In a medium bowl, combine black beans, edamame, squash, celery, lime juice, canola oil, rosemary, salt and black pepper. Toss gently, yet thoroughly until well coated. Just before serving add the avocado and toss gently. Notes Canada's Choices per serving: ½ carbohydrate ½ meat and alternative Yield: 4 cups (1 L); serves 8 - 1/2 cup per serving Recipe courtesy of www.canolainfo.org. Calories 100 Total fat 5 g Saturated fat 0 g Cholesterol 0 mg Sodium 80 mg Carbohydrates 11 g Fiber 4 g Protein 5 g Continue reading >>

Tomato Avocado Salad

Tomato Avocado Salad

Avocado toast is not only pretty to eat but super simple on busy mornings! You can omit the egg if you have an egg intolerance or allergy or are following an autoimmune protocol. The healthy fats and the collagen peptides make this an easy and satisf... Strawberry Ice Cream Cake with Date Nut Crust (Dairy Free) This cake is the perfect sweet treat to wow all your guests! It is made using no added sugar and all-natural, nourishing ingredients that are sure to stimulate your taste buds and leave you wanting more. This is best for a summer party, friendl... Its never a bad time for soup, especially a healthy carrot soup. Enjoy this soup on a busy weeknight and make extra for lunch the next day. This recipe is free of gluten, dairy and soy and can be tailored to suit your taste buds! Add extra spices ... Summer Salad Rolls with Walnut Beef and Peanut Sauce A little twist on a classic salad roll is up next! I mean, come on, how excited are you to try out walnut beef? After adapting the recipe and practicing it a few times I finally came up with this goodie! These rolls are slightly time consuming but wh... Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Avocado Salad Recipe

Avocado Salad Recipe

An avocado salad recipe makes perfect sense on a site about how to have permanent fat loss. Yes, it has a lot of fat in it but if there is one thing I hope I can convey on this site, its how real food fats do NOT make you fat (unless you eat them with sugar!) You need to eat fats - they make food taste good and they help you to feel full. Fats are essential for our good health. Avocado is an important food for you for weight management and to control and reverse your diabetes. Avocado is the only fruit with fat content and it has a lot...30 grams for a whole avocado which is your daily requirement. That's what makes it such a great ingredient for salads. You only need 1/4 of an avocado at a time which is a servings worth. Avocados contain monounsaturated fats which help to control your blood sugar and diabetes. This salad which teams the avocado with a Mexican style dressing is great with chicken, fish, beans or a grain. It really adds so much flavor and richness to any meal. Youll need to make your toasted sunflower seeds the night before you make the salad. You can buy your avocado hard and let it ripen at home on your kitchen counter. When I was going to college I was lucky enough to live in Santa Barbara and have a generous neighbor with many avocado trees. It seemed like an embarrassment of riches to be able to eat avocados so often. To open them cut it lengthwise, rotating the knife all the way around the seed. Then twist the halves in opposite directions to separate them. To remove the pit, slip the tip of of a spoon underneath and pry it up. 1 cup of watercress pulled apart and cut across 1/2 teaspoon dried oregano or 1 teaspoon fresh You'll be preparing your seeds a couple of days before you're ready to make the salad. You're toasting enough seeds to use on ot Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

Avocados Can Be Part Of A Diabetes Diet

Avocados Can Be Part Of A Diabetes Diet

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet is often perceived to be a challenge, but rest assured you don’t have to sacrifice flavor and satisfaction when creating an eating plan that will help contribute to your healthful eating pattern, a key component of diabetes health management. A Healthful Eating Pattern The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a healthful eating pattern as a key component in managing diabetes, with meals and snacks that emphasize nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes. As a nutrient-dense fruit, California Avocados are a natural food choice for a healthful eating pattern, a key component of a diabetes eating plan and here’s why: Good fats A 1 oz. serving of avocados (1/5 of a medium avocado) offers good mono-and polyunsaturated fats. People with diabetes are at risk for heart disease. Limiting saturated fat and including good fats in your diet is an important part of a sensible eating plan. For example, when preparing foods, replace sources of saturated fat with good fats like those in avocados as well as nuts, olives and canola oil. Dietary fiber Dietary fiber is not broken down (digested) by the body, so it does not raise blood sugar levels. Keeping blood sugar levels constant is an ideal goal as part of a diabetes control plan. A 1-oz. serving of avocados provides 8% of the Daily Value for dietary fiber Carb-Conscious During digestion, carbohydrates from food break down into glucose (sugar) in the body and they have the greatest impact on blood sugar levels. A 1-oz. serving of avocados has three grams of carbohydrate (1% of the Daily Value) making it a delicious food solution if you’re counting carbohydrates in meals and snacks Sodium and Cholesterol-Free Avocados are naturally sodium and cholesterol free, two dietary componen Continue reading >>

An A+ For Avocados

An A+ For Avocados

Now that winter is upon us, it seems like many of us have to make an effort to fit fresh fruits and vegetables into our diets. Instead, we often turn to fatty or starchy comfort foods. But one vegetable (which is actually a fruit) that we can take advantage of all year round is the avocado. Fruit? Vegetable? Fat? The avocado seems somewhat mysterious in terms of what the heck it actually is. By botanical definition, the avocado is a fruit. A fruit is the part of the plant that develops from a flower. And, it’s the part of the plant that contains the seed or seeds. Other parts of the plant, like the stem, the leaves, and the roots are the vegetables. Based on this definition, then, an avocado is a fruit. We’re used to fruits being sweet and vegetables being savory. (But you might be interested to know that other “fruits” include beans, corn, nuts, grains, tomatoes, and cucumbers.). OK, so an avocado is a fruit, even though we tend to eat it as a vegetable. But what’s with all the fat in it? Avocados do indeed contain a hefty amount of fat, and for this reason, avocados are listed in the food exchange lists as a “fat choice.” Here’s the nutritional breakdown of a whole avocado (minus the skin) that weighs 7 ounces: 318 calories 17 grams of carbohydrate 13 grams of fiber 4 grams of protein 29 grams of fat Those 29 grams of fat are not insignificant; however, the type of fat in avocados is primarily monounsaturated fat, a heart-healthy fat that can help lower LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol, and lower the risk of heart attack and stroke. In addition, the type of fiber in this fruit is both insoluble and soluble, which means that it can help regulate digestion and lower cholesterol and blood sugars at the same time. Keep an eye on the amount of avocado you eat Continue reading >>

Corn, Tomato And Avocado Salad

Corn, Tomato And Avocado Salad

You are here: Home / Salads & Dressings / Corn, Tomato and Avocado Salad Posted by: Shelby Kinnaird / Salads & Dressings , Side Dishes / To kick off Eat Without Shopping Week, I threw together this salad made with fresh, local tomatoes I got at the farmers market, an avocado I had left over after making avocado quesadillas for my visiting sister-in-law last weekend and some frozen corn. The salad would have been much, much better with fresh corn kernels, but this is an exercise in getting rid of stuff in the freezer, refrigerator and pantry, after all. This recipe below was published in the June/July 2009 issue of Food Network Magazine. I made a few tweaks and would probably make a few more if I prepared the recipe again. I used shredded mozzarella instead of cubed (because its what I had and its Eat Without Shopping Week) and heirloom tomatoes instead of grape tomatoes. I should have seeded the tomatoes they were so juicy, the salad ended up having way too much liquid. I like the fact that mozzarella added some protein, but honestly, Im not sure the cheese contributed anything to the overall taste and texture of the dish. Perhaps if I had used cubed cheese, I would have a different opinion. The nutritional information below assumes the use of whole-milk mozzarella which adds a load of saturated fat. Skipping the cheese saves you 387 calories, eliminates the saturated fat and greatly reduces the cholesterol and sodium in the dish. The salad is also a good source of vitamins C and K. Continue reading >>

Easy Avocado Recipes | Everydaydiabeticrecipes.com

Easy Avocado Recipes | Everydaydiabeticrecipes.com

This simple guacamole dip is an avocado lover's dream! Add some flavor by dipping your favorite veggies into this amazing appetizer. An easy, diabetic-friendly recipe that is perfect for a potluck, get-together, or just as a yummy snack for work. Our In-a-Wink Guacamole Dip is a quick recipe that will disappear in the blink of an eye. With salsa, chili powder, bell peppers and tortillas, this Southwestern Chicken Casserole is a fiesta on your plate! And a healthier one at that! Don't be surprised if you want to break out the sombreros for this easy avocado recipe that's also a diabetic-friendly dish ! This easy avocado recipe always surprises people. That's 'cause they're a little unsure about a taco salad that doesn't have any cheese or sour cream. Good news is, once they get a forkful they always say, "Wow, this is a Tasty Taco Salad!" That's right, fresh and flavorful ingredients (plus a creamy homemade dressing) make for one healthy and delicious taco salad! Cobb salad is one of our favorite American salads 'cause it's got a ton of yummy ingredients like egg, bacon, cheese, tomato, avocado, and more! It's said that this salad was first created at the Brown Derby restaurant in Hollywood, which is why we call this our Brown Derby Cobb Salad. It's an easy avocado recipe that will fill you up! For a company-fancy appetizer that won't take you more than 10 minutes to make, try our Taco Shrimp Bites. Every bite is full of flavor, thanks to zesty seasoned shrimp, creamy avocado, and sour cream. They'll have a hard time believing this appetizer is an easy avocado recipe that's low-carb and diabetic-friendly! Our Citrusy Avocado Salad with a drizzle of poppy seed dressing tastes like it came from a fancy restaurant. Not only is this easy avocado recipe a healthy everyday op Continue reading >>

Blackened Chicken With Avocado Salad

Blackened Chicken With Avocado Salad

Now that summer is upon us, I cant get enough grilled food. I especially enjoy serving grilled meat over a raw vegetable salad its healthy, easy and doesnt heat up the house on those hot days. Warning: the seasoning on this chicken definitely has some bite to it so if youre not into spicy food, you may want to tone it down a notch with a little less cayenne. This blackening powder is delicious on fish as well. Mix dry ingredients together in a small bowl to create blackening powder. Then coat both sides of the chicken breast with the blackening powder. (I generally use about 1 Tbsp. powder per filet.) Heat a grill to medium-high heat (or heat a saut pan over medium-high heat). Spray pan or grill with non-stick cooking spray. Cook chicken until center is cooked through, about 4 minutes per side, or internal temperature of 165 degrees. Remove from heat and let rest for 2-3 minutes. Meanwhile, mix tomato, red pepper, red onion, parsley, lemon juice and olive oil together in a small bowl. Season with salt and pepper. Portion on to 4 individual plates and top each with a quarter of the sliced avocado. Slice chicken breasts and top each vegetable salad with the chicken. Copyright 2009-2016 Diabetes Media Foundation, All Rights Reserved. ASweetLife is a trademark of theDiabetes Media Foundation, All Rights Reserved. Continue reading >>

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