diabetestalk.net

Avocado For Diabetics

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods You Should Be Eating For Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Healthy Food Choices for Type 2 Diabetes Paying attention to what you eat is essential for controlling your weight and blood glucose levels when you have type 2 diabetes. While this means knowing which foods to limit or avoid, it’s just as important to know which foods are the most beneficial to you — and how to include them in your meal planning. “When it comes to eating a healthy diet for type 2 diabetes, balance is really the key,” says Kelly Kennedy, RD, resident nutritionist for Everyday Health. “Many people think that they have to avoid carbohydrates if they have diabetes, but this is not the case. Instead, it's important to focus on eating approximately the same amount of carbohydrates from healthy sources, such as dairy foods, legumes, fruit, and whole grains, at each meal.” Also make whole foods — such as fruit, vegetables, lean proteins, fat-free or non-fat dairy, whole grains, and healthy fats — your go-tos. “Those provide the most nutritional ‘bang for your buck,'" Kennedy adds. Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Avocado And Diabetes Prevention And Treatment

Diabetes is a massive health problem with approximately 19 million Americans diagnosed with the disease. There are also believed to be a further 7 million people who are undiagnosed sufferers, according to the National Institute of Diabetes. That’s over 8% of the US population affected by a disease that is the leading cause of kidney failure, new cases of blindness in adults and non-trauma lower limb amputations. Diabetes is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke and now the seventh highest cause of death in the United States. The primary symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include significantly increased thirst and hunger and the need to urinate more often. Vision problems, a dry mouth, rapid weight loss and leg pain can also be symptoms. If you exhibit any of these, please see a healthcare professional to have a simple check. Around half a million people in America lose their lives through diabetes each year. Millions more have to deal with the debilitating effects of the disease every day. Even worse, if the current upward trend of newly diagnosed cases continues, it has been predicted that more than half of all American adults will develop diabetes or prediabetes by 2020. This alone would likely collapse our health system, yet conventional medicine does not seem to be making significant inroads into beating the disease. Perhaps this is because it is not some new wonder drug that is needed, but rather a serious change in many of our lifestyles, particularly in the type of foods we eat. If you are already living with the condition, you would be worth reading these 5 important tips for diabetics to help reduce the damage of this debilitating disease. How the Monounsaturated Fats in Avocados Benefit Diabetes The American Diabetes Association Continue reading >>

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

What Are Some Good Snacks For A Person That Is Diabetic And Has Low Sodium?

Diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, is associated with many health complications, including kidney diseases. If you are diabetic, you can decrease your risk of developing kidney disease by keeping your blood sugar and blood pressure under control. If your kidneys are already damaged by your diabetes, following a diet that helps you minimize further damage by keeping your blood sugar under control is key. Your doctor and dietitian will keep a close eye on your electrolytes, such as sodium, potassium and phosphorus, to advise you on how to adjust your diet accordingly. Most people with diabetes and kidney diseases have high levels of these electrolytes and need to consume less. Vegetables and Guacamole Non-starchy vegetables have a very low carbohydrate but high fiber content, which can help to fill you up without increasing your blood sugar levels. If you need a snack to sustain you between meals, prepare yourself a serving of raw vegetables, such as cucumber slices, carrot and celery sticks and cauliflower and broccoli florets. Instead of dipping your vegetables in commercial dipping sauces, which are often made with processed ingredients, use homemade guacamole. Simply mash an avocado and season it with pepper and lemon juice. If your blood sodium is high, don't add salt, and if your sodium is low, be more generous with the amount of salt you add. Fruits and Nut Butter Although fruits contain some carbohydrates, they also pack a lot of water, fiber and a variety of antioxidants. Don't have too much fruit at once, and limit yourself to the equivalent of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates to prevent your blood sugar levels from rising too high. For example, a small to medium apple provides 20 to 25 grams of carbohydrates, while the amount of carbohydrates in a banana usually Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Avocado Avocado is high in monounsaturated fats, which are generally considered among the healthiest of fats. Researchers have found that a diet high in monounsaturated fats and low in low–quality carbs may improve insulin sensitivity. Monounsaturated fats also improve heart health — an especially important benefit for diabetics, who are at an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Add a few thin slices of avocado to your sandwiches in place of mayonnaise, or mash a ripe avocado with cilantro, lime juice, and diced tomato for a delicious guacamole dip. Now that you know which foods can help control blood sugars, find out which ones can lead to terrible diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocado And Diabetes: Benefits, Risks, And More

Avocados are growing in popularity. The creamy green fruit is packed with vitamins, nutrients, and heart-healthy fats . While they are high in fat, its the good kind of fat that benefits people with type 2 diabetes . If you have type 2 diabetes, adding avocado to your diet may help you lose weight, lower cholesterol, and increase insulin sensitivity. Read on to learn more about the benefits of avocados for people with diabetes. Benefits of avocadofor people with type 2 diabetes Avocados are low in carbohydrates, which means they have little effect on blood sugar levels. A recent study published in Nutrition Journal evaluated the effects of adding half an avocado to the standard lunch of healthy, overweight people. They discovered that avocados do not significantly impact blood sugar levels. Part of what makes avocados a good choice for people with diabetes is that, although they are low in carbs, they are high in fiber. Many other high-fiber foods may still spike blood sugar levels. One half of a small avocado, which is the standard amount people eat, contains about 5.9 grams of carbohydrate and 4.6 grams of fiber. According to the National Academies , the minimum recommended daily fiber intake for adults is: A 2012 review published in the Journal of the American Board of Family Medicine looked at the results of 15 studies involving fiber supplements (around 40 grams of fiber) for people with type 2 diabetes. They found that fiber supplements for type 2 diabetes can reduce fasting blood sugar levels and A1c levels . You dont need to take supplements to achieve these results. Instead, try eating a high-fiber diet. You can easily increase your fiber intake by eating more low-carb fruits, vegetables and plants, like avocados, leafy greens, berries, chia seeds, and nuts. H Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good Or Bad For Diabetics?

Diabetes, as we know, is a complicated disease and in order to effectively manage the chronic illness, one has to take a lot of measures with respect to the diet and lifestyle. One of the much-loved fruit all across the world is Avocado. Most of the diabetic patients therefore often ask the question Is Avocado Good or Bad for Diabetics? In this article, we shall deep dive and try to analyze the relationship between Avocado and diabetes in detail. Let us first understand some of the facts related with Avocados. The fruit is a rich source of antioxidants and minerals such as potassium, vitamin E as well as Vitamin C. The fruit is known to be rich in a number of vitamin B such as riboflavin, pyridoxine, niacin, amongst others. They contain high amount of fats but the same is in the form of monosaturated fats, something that is considered good for diabetes An average medium sized Avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates Relationship Between Avocado and the Blood Sugar Level As per the United States Department of Agriculture, an average size of the fruit contains around 17 grams of carbohydrates. Hence, Avocado is a fruit which you can include in your diet without worrying about the increase in the levels of blood glucose. In fact, studies have shown that when you combine this fruit with other foods as part of your diet, any increase in the level of blood glucose is said to decline and stabilize. Other Benefits of Eating Avocado for People Suffering From Diabetes Eating and including Avocado has several health benefits apart from the advantage of stabilizing the level of blood glucose in the body. Some of the other benefits of the fruit include the following: The fruit is a rich source of fiber. Fiber is important as it helps in the smooth digestion of food in the body. Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

7 Best Foods For Diabetics

7 Best Foods For Diabetics

Written by Abbe Brooks, dietetic intern from Duke University Hospital Poorly controlled blood sugar in individuals with diabetes and prediabetes can threaten heart, kidney, eye, and bone health, and increase your risk of complications, such as nerve damage. Managing your blood sugar can feel like a constant uphill battle. Using healthy nutrition options can give you an edge in blood sugar control while also optimizing other aspects, such as heart and bone health. Whether you are looking for ways to control your diabetes, or maybe you are simply curious about some healthy foods to reduce your risk of diabetes and improve your health – take a look at these 7 foods to add to your busy week! Avocados As you probably know, avocados are a terrific source of monounsaturated fats, or “healthy fats,” that work to lower LDL cholesterol and decrease your risk of heart disease. But there is so much more to avocados, as they are also a great source of fiber, vitamins, and minerals. By eating ½ of an avocado, you can get 5 grams of fiber and 330 milligrams of potassium. These unassuming fruits have a low glycemic index with high antioxidant activity and work to regulate glucose uptake and reduce blood sugar spikes after meals.1 Pair with whole grain toast and an egg for breakfast or toss it in a smoothie. Get more bang for your buck by adding a serving of avocados to your morning routine or as a snack in between meals. Just remember, these guys pack a lot of calories so be mindful of your servings; ½ an avocado is 109 calories.2 Beans What is the big deal with beans? The big deal is adding 1 cup of beans to your balanced diet has been shown to decrease blood pressure and hemoglobin A1c in individuals with type 2 diabetes when paired with a low glycemic index diet.3 These snea Continue reading >>

An A+ For Avocados

An A+ For Avocados

Now that winter is upon us, it seems like many of us have to make an effort to fit fresh fruits and vegetables into our diets. Instead, we often turn to fatty or starchy comfort foods. But one vegetable (which is actually a fruit) that we can take advantage of all year round is the avocado. Fruit? Vegetable? Fat? The avocado seems somewhat mysterious in terms of what the heck it actually is. By botanical definition, the avocado is a fruit. A fruit is the part of the plant that develops from a flower. And, it’s the part of the plant that contains the seed or seeds. Other parts of the plant, like the stem, the leaves, and the roots are the vegetables. Based on this definition, then, an avocado is a fruit. We’re used to fruits being sweet and vegetables being savory. (But you might be interested to know that other “fruits” include beans, corn, nuts, grains, tomatoes, and cucumbers.). OK, so an avocado is a fruit, even though we tend to eat it as a vegetable. But what’s with all the fat in it? Avocados do indeed contain a hefty amount of fat, and for this reason, avocados are listed in the food exchange lists as a “fat choice.” Here’s the nutritional breakdown of a whole avocado (minus the skin) that weighs 7 ounces: 318 calories 17 grams of carbohydrate 13 grams of fiber 4 grams of protein 29 grams of fat Those 29 grams of fat are not insignificant; however, the type of fat in avocados is primarily monounsaturated fat, a heart-healthy fat that can help lower LDL, or “bad,” cholesterol, and lower the risk of heart attack and stroke. In addition, the type of fiber in this fruit is both insoluble and soluble, which means that it can help regulate digestion and lower cholesterol and blood sugars at the same time. Keep an eye on the amount of avocado you eat Continue reading >>

5 Reasons You Should Be Eating Avocados Every Day

5 Reasons You Should Be Eating Avocados Every Day

5 reasons you should be eating avocados every day Jack is a 27-year-old journalist based in Coventry, UK. He is a type 1 diabetic who enjoys sport, boring weekends, MTV and once won a talent show for dancing to Dario Gs 1997 hit Sunchyme. Tagged with heart disease , Low-Carb Program , metabolic syndrome The avocado is often referred to as a superfood. Its health benefits are plentiful, and its versatility makes it a vital addition to any diet. The fruit can vary in terms of size, shape, weight and colour, but you cant go too far wrong whichever type you eat. Avocados are now becoming a widely popular option for people looking to improve their health, and because they are very low-carb , avocados are an ideal food choice for people with diabetes. And of course, they are delicious. Here are five reasons why you should be eating avocados on a daily basis. The list of healthy ingredients found in avocados is dense. First, theres monosaturated fats. These make up 71% of an avocado and can reduce total cholesterol levels and the risk of heart disease. One particular monosaturated fat, oleic acid, is linked to reduced inflammation and has beneficial effects on genes linked to cancer . Avocados are also packed with soluble fibre, which can reduce LDL cholesterol (known as bad cholesterol), while its high potassium content can help promote normal blood pressure. Overall, an avocado contains 20 different minerals, vitamins and phytonutrients per 1-oz serving. Maintaining a healthy weight is essential for everyone, but particularly people with diabetes. Eating a low-carb diet can help people with diabetes lose weight, and avocados fit perfectly into a low-carb diet. An avocado typically contains 17g carbohydrate, but 9g of thisis dietary fibre. This low-carb, high-fibre combinati Continue reading >>

Diabetic Friendly

Diabetic Friendly

From our Blog More recipes to try By: Rachael Hutchings . Hoecakes are the precursor to Southern-style cornbread. I’m talking the real cornbread. Not the sweet, almost-cake version of cornbread—not that there’s anything wrong with that! Read More By: Rachael Hutchings I love a good acai bowl. If you’ve never had one, it may be time to jump on the bandwagon! An acai bowl is a smoothie that you eat with a spoon out of bowl that features the acai berry. Read More By: Kristen Doyle Replacing the butter in this dinner roll recipe with avocado changes the nutritional component, but really doesn’t change the flavor profile of the rolls. Read More View All Blog Posts Continue reading >>

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

If you have diabetes, you know that food plays a big role in controlling your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate--containing foods, which include sugar, sweets, sugary drinks, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, are converted to sugar during the digestion process and therefore contribute to raising your blood sugar levels after eating. A high--carb intake will result in high blood sugar levels. Video of the Day The nutrition facts for avocado depend on its size. For example, a whole California avocado provides about 227 calories, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates and 9.2 grams of fiber, while a Florida avocado is larger and contains 365 calories, 23.8 grams of carbohydrates and 17.0 grams of fiber. With diabetes, carbohydrates elevate your blood sugar levels, but only the starch and sugar part of the total carbohydrates, not the fiber. Available Carbohydrate and Diabetes To better estimate the effect of avocado on your blood sugar levels, you can calculate their available carbohydrate content by subtracting fiber from the total carbs. In the case of a California avocado, you get 2.6 grams of available carbohydrates, while a Florida avocado contains 6.8 grams of available carbohydates because of its larger size. Usually, diabetics are recommended to limit their carb intake to 45 grams to 60 grams per meal. Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado. Although avocado itself is not likely to hinder your glycemic control, it is often served with high-carb foods such as tortillas, nacho chips and taco shells. If your meal includes foods that have a high carbohydrate content, your blood sugar is likely to rise, so count your carbs to ensure you do not eat more carbo Continue reading >>

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

A friend of mine has been classified as pre-diabetic. The nurse has given her a diet sheet of a healthy diet for pre-diabetes and diabetics. On the sheet it mentions that avocados should be restricted. I believe that avocados do not spike blood sugar so what would be the reason behind its restriction? Does the nurse think it is unhealthy? Good because I told her to carry on eating as I felt avocados would be really good for her because of the fat content, vitamins and minerals. The diet sheet seemed confused about the message to present and it made it difficult for my friend to understand. I had a quick browse on the diabetes.co.uk website and everything seemed to be positive about eating avocados. In fact this link seems to be at odds with the NHS diabetes.co.uk/diet/nhs-die.... I have just read a booklet on Alzheimer's which unfortunately she is in the early stages. One of the foods that it suggests for brain health is avocados.To me it was a no brainer (excuse the pun) that avocado was indeed beneficial for her plus she enjoys eating them. Avocado is a great food to eat and I do believe your friend should continue eating them-- especially if she likes them and they are very healthy for anyone. I'm a type 1 diabetic and I have avocado on salads, on the side and with other meals. Great job! Quite often these kind of "guidelines" have 3 sections - 1. foods that are encouraged 2. foods that are forbidden and 3. foods that are "restricted" - restricted in this sense usually means allowed but limited in quantity. Avocados are good for you - but I suspect that "too many" avocados would not be good for you because of their fat content. It is "good fat" and we need fat in our diets - but there is a limit!! HI. I was diagnosed pre-diabetic at the end of August 2016. I joined t Continue reading >>

Avocados Can Be Part Of A Diabetes Diet

Avocados Can Be Part Of A Diabetes Diet

Eating a diabetes-friendly diet is often perceived to be a challenge, but rest assured you don’t have to sacrifice flavor and satisfaction when creating an eating plan that will help contribute to your healthful eating pattern, a key component of diabetes health management. A Healthful Eating Pattern The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends a healthful eating pattern as a key component in managing diabetes, with meals and snacks that emphasize nutrient-dense foods in appropriate portion sizes. As a nutrient-dense fruit, California Avocados are a natural food choice for a healthful eating pattern, a key component of a diabetes eating plan and here’s why: Good fats A 1 oz. serving of avocados (1/5 of a medium avocado) offers good mono-and polyunsaturated fats. People with diabetes are at risk for heart disease. Limiting saturated fat and including good fats in your diet is an important part of a sensible eating plan. For example, when preparing foods, replace sources of saturated fat with good fats like those in avocados as well as nuts, olives and canola oil. Dietary fiber Dietary fiber is not broken down (digested) by the body, so it does not raise blood sugar levels. Keeping blood sugar levels constant is an ideal goal as part of a diabetes control plan. A 1-oz. serving of avocados provides 8% of the Daily Value for dietary fiber Carb-Conscious During digestion, carbohydrates from food break down into glucose (sugar) in the body and they have the greatest impact on blood sugar levels. A 1-oz. serving of avocados has three grams of carbohydrate (1% of the Daily Value) making it a delicious food solution if you’re counting carbohydrates in meals and snacks Sodium and Cholesterol-Free Avocados are naturally sodium and cholesterol free, two dietary componen Continue reading >>

More in diabetes