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Avocado And Prediabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Preventing Pre-diabetes

Pre-diabetes is a serious medical condition that puts you at a higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Pre-diabetes is also very treatable, and if you have it, there is a good chance you can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes by making changes in your diet and increasing your level of physical activity. Type 2 Diabetes Type 2 diabetes occurs when your body does not produce or use enough insulin to be able to turn glucose into energy. Glucose is the sugar and starch that comes from the food you eat, which fuels your body. Insulin is a hormone that carries glucose from your blood into your cells. Without enough insulin, sugar builds up in your blood and can cause serious health problems. Pre-Diabetes Pre-diabetes is when your fasting blood glucose (blood sugar) level is above normal. To test for pre-diabetes, your doctor will take a sample of your blood after you have fasted overnight: Normal fasting glucose: 60 to 99 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dl) Pre-diabetes (impaired fasting glucose): 100 to 125 mg/dl Diabetes: 126 mg/dl or higher on 2 occasions Healthy Tips for Preventing Type 2 Diabetes If you have pre-diabetes, you should talk to your doctor about developing a lifestyle plan to reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association recommends increased physical activity and, if you are overweight, losing 5-10 percent of your body weight. Your doctor may also want you to take medication if you have a family history of diabetes, you are obese, or have other cardiovascular risk factors (high blood pressure, high cholesterol levels, or a history of heart disease). Below are tips to help you keep pre-diabetes from progressing to Type 2 diabetes: Exercise Every Day Since muscles use glucose for energy, activities like walking, bicycling, and gardening Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetics?

Over the years many people have come to fear avocados. I think this largely comes from the weight loss/ low fat industry pushing us not to eat fat because the common thinking is that we'll end up getting fat. Now I hear no end of people saying they avoid avocado, or left questioning is avocado good for diabetics? Well I hope this info helps to clear that up for you because avocado is one of the very best and healthiest foods we can all eat, diabetic or not. So let's dig in. So Is Avocado Good For Diabetics? As you most likely know, as a diabetic the macronutrient you most have to be concerned about is carbohydrates. But as dietitian Aglaee Jacob points out: “Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado”. What she means by available carbohydrates is that fiber does not affect blood sugar levels, only starch and sugar does. So when you subtract the amount of fiber in a food you are left with the net carbs, which is the net effect of that carbohydrate food. Sometimes it seems like a food has quite a bit of carbohydrate but once you minus the fiber you're left with very low ‘available carbohydrate content', just like the avocado in this instance. Avocado Is High In Monounsaturated Fat The fat found in avocado is 71% monounsaturated fat, 13% polyunsaturated, and 16% saturated fat. Monounsaturated fats provide diabetics with valuable health benefits: Eating a diet rich in monounsaturated fat from avocados helps to lower cholesterol and has a beneficial influence on glycemic control in people with type 2 diabetes Even after 7 days of eating a high avocado diet, total cholesterol level has been shown to decrease by 17% in hypercholesterolemia patients, 22% decrease in LD Continue reading >>

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

Avocado: Superfood For Diabetes

As a person with diabetes, I love avocados. That beautiful, alligator-skinned, green-egg shaped thing. Sorry, it doesn’t come with ham. (Oh come on, that was funny!) So, why do I love avocados, and why are they so good for people with diabetes? First of all, it’s low-carb and high in fat, and the fat is all good for you (because it’s mostly a healthy fat). The avocado is also yummy, like butter, except instead of killing you, it’s saving you. I know, I know, big claims, but why? Here are some of the nutritional wonders of the average California avocado: about 320 calories 17 grams carbs 13 grams of fiber 30 grams of fat –> 4 grams of saturated fat (the least healthy kind) –> 20 grams monounsaturated fat (the most healthy kind) –> 4 grams of polyunsaturated fat (a pretty healthy kind) Numerous vitamins and minerals, including the ever so important electrolytes potassium and magnesium. In fact, an avocado usually has 3 times more potassium than a banana does. Now let’s break that down. 320 calories. That’s pretty high, right? So what! With everything you get in this wonder fruit, it’s worth it. Yes, it’s a fruit, not a vegetable. The avocado is also known as an “alligator pear.” 17 grams of carbs and 13 grams of fiber. As people with diabetes, you know that’s a really odd ratio, and it seems that you may not even need to take any insulin when you eat one of these things, because we always substract the fiber from the carbohydrates to calculate our insulin needs. Personally, I don’t need any insulin for an avocado, and that’s part of why I love them. 30 grams of fat. That’s high too, right? So what! The simple myth of “eating fat makes you fat” simply isn’t accurate. Fat doesn’t make you fat. You get 20 grams of monounsaturated fat Continue reading >>

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

Let's Talk About How Much Sugar You Eat & Prediabetes

I know you get it. Cut down on sugar. Then, you won’t be obese and get diabetes. But do you know how much sugar you are eating? When I have clients come in for nutrition consultations, they are always shocked by how much more sugar they are eating than they should. Let’s review the numbers and tips on how to make sure your sugar intake is sweet, not bittersweet. National surveys have found that the average American consumes around 85 grams of sugar every day. According to the new USDA guidelines, we should really be eating a fraction of that amount. The recommended sugar intake for adult women is 22 grams of sugar per day, for adult men, it’s 36 grams daily, and for children, it's 12 grams a day. Over time, consistently taking in more sugar will lead to insulin resistance disease, otherwise known as diabetes. What’s alarming is that many people do not realize they are on the road to diabetes. This epidemic of “on the way to diabetes” is called prediabetes. Type 2 diabetes doesn’t appear all of a sudden and the slow, long and invisible road there is prediabetes, which is where blood sugar levels are consistently higher than normal over a long time slowly affecting insulin signaling. Many people focus on calories rather than sugar since diabetics are supposed to look at sugar not you and me. But unfortunately, a new report from the Center for Disease Control and Prevention shows that among Americans age 20 and older, as many as 73 million Americans have prediabetes, which is about 1 in 3 Americans! That’s a lot of missed opportunities to prevent diabetes by cutting down on sugar intake. You can check with your doctor if you have prediabetes, which is a fasting glucose level of 100-125 mg/dL. Being prediabetic is a serious game changer since it is much easi Continue reading >>

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

Avocado And Pre-diabetes

A friend of mine has been classified as pre-diabetic. The nurse has given her a diet sheet of a healthy diet for pre-diabetes and diabetics. On the sheet it mentions that avocados should be restricted. I believe that avocados do not spike blood sugar so what would be the reason behind its restriction? Does the nurse think it is unhealthy? Good because I told her to carry on eating as I felt avocados would be really good for her because of the fat content, vitamins and minerals. The diet sheet seemed confused about the message to present and it made it difficult for my friend to understand. I had a quick browse on the diabetes.co.uk website and everything seemed to be positive about eating avocados. In fact this link seems to be at odds with the NHS diabetes.co.uk/diet/nhs-die.... I have just read a booklet on Alzheimer's which unfortunately she is in the early stages. One of the foods that it suggests for brain health is avocados.To me it was a no brainer (excuse the pun) that avocado was indeed beneficial for her plus she enjoys eating them. Avocado is a great food to eat and I do believe your friend should continue eating them-- especially if she likes them and they are very healthy for anyone. I'm a type 1 diabetic and I have avocado on salads, on the side and with other meals. Great job! Quite often these kind of "guidelines" have 3 sections - 1. foods that are encouraged 2. foods that are forbidden and 3. foods that are "restricted" - restricted in this sense usually means allowed but limited in quantity. Avocados are good for you - but I suspect that "too many" avocados would not be good for you because of their fat content. It is "good fat" and we need fat in our diets - but there is a limit!! HI. I was diagnosed pre-diabetic at the end of August 2016. I joined t Continue reading >>

The Many Benefits Of Avocado For Diabetes Treatment And Prevention

The Many Benefits Of Avocado For Diabetes Treatment And Prevention

Avocado and Diabetes Prevention and Treatment Diabetes is a massive health problem with approximately 19 million Americans diagnosed with the disease. There are also believed to be a further 7 million people who are undiagnosed sufferers, according to the National Institute of Diabetes. Thats over 8% of the US population affected by a disease that is the leading cause of kidney failure, new cases of blindness in adults andnon-trauma lower limb amputations. Diabetes is also a significant risk factor for cardiovascular disease and stroke and now the seventh highest cause of death inthe United States. The primary symptoms of undiagnosed diabetes include significantly increased thirst and hunger and the need to urinate more often. Vision problems, a dry mouth, rapid weight loss and leg pain can also be symptoms. If you exhibit any of these, please see a healthcare professional to have a simple check. Around half a million people in America lose their lives through diabetes each year. Millions more have to deal with the debilitating effects of the disease every day. Even worse, if the current upward trend of newly diagnosed cases continues, it has been predicted that more than half of all American adults will develop diabetes or prediabetes by 2020. This alone would likely collapse our health system, yet conventional medicine does not seem to be making significant inroads into beating the disease. Perhaps this is because it is not some new wonder drug that is needed, but rather a serious change in many of our lifestyles, particularly in the type of foods we eat. If you are already living with the condition, you would be worth reading these 5 important tips for diabetics to help reduce the damage of this debilitating disease. How the Monounsaturated Fats in Avocados Benefit Continue reading >>

How I Was Able To Reverse Prediabetes And You Can Too In Just 11 Steps!

How I Was Able To Reverse Prediabetes And You Can Too In Just 11 Steps!

Note: Today’s post was written by Nancy Klein, a natural health enthusiast. Before I discovered these 11 natural healthy tips, I was one of the many Americans walking around with prediabetes and not knowing it. I would consider myself extremely lucky to have gotten this warning sign because I was able to stop the progression and reverse prediabetes that may have eventually led to diabetes type 2. I didn’t believe I had prediabetes, I wasn’t overweight! I found out from a blood test that I had prediabetes and this didn’t make any sense because I thought that I was eating a healthy diet of fruits, vegetables, and limited carbs. I never had a weight problem, at my 40th high school reunion I weighed only 5 lbs over my slim high school weight! My only health concern was being occasionally hypothyroid and for that I was seeing a great homeopathic doctor that kept an eye on my thyroid levels. But when he tested by blood, I found out that my blood sugar was slightly out of normal range. His recommendation–stop eating fruits! I hated to hear this because I had been enjoying eating an orange every day and I thought this was a healthy thing to do. Well, fast forward to one year later and my blood sugar is much improved. I was able to reverse prediabetes! I feel that now, I am the healthiest I’ve ever been because I have followed some simple steps to get my blood sugar in check. You can reverse prediabetes, too! Is Prediabetes Common? Over 79 million Americans have prediabetes according to data from the CDC and many of them are walking around not knowing this! Most importantly, they are missing out on the opportunity to prevent future type 2 diabetes and the resulting multitude of detrimental health effects such as; heart disease, neuropathy, kidney disease, eye damage Continue reading >>

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

The Prediabetes Diet Everyone Should Follow

Skip the sugary sodas and processed food, and opt for whole foods like fruits and vegetables, whole grains, lean meats, low-fat dairy, and healthy fats like olive oil and avocado, Experts believe the number of people living with diabetes will rise dramatically over the next 40 years. If current trends continue, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), as many as one in three adults could have the disease by 2050. And about 79 million American adults now have prediabetes, a condition marked by above-normal blood sugar levels that aren't high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. If there's a silver lining to these alarming statistics, it's that there's plenty you can do to prevent the disease or slow the progression, including eating a balanced diet. Everyone can benefit from a healthy eating plan aimed at containing prediabetes, regardless of whether you're at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes, says Barbara Borcik, RD, a certified diabetes eductor at the Diabetes & Nutrition Center at Northwest Hospital in Randallstown, Md. 7 Golden Rules of Healthy Eating Here are seven sound diet principles that can keep your blood sugars from creeping upward, among other health benefits. Skip the sugary drinks. No sweet tea. No juice. No soda. No sweetened lemonade. No mocha latte coffee creations. "My number one recommendation to people is: Don't drink your sugar," Borcik says. Sugary drinks provide nothing more than empty calories, and they won't help you feel full. "All the sugary drinks out there are a real risk factor for obesity," she stresses. Pull back on portions. You still can eat many of the foods you like, just have smaller amounts of them, Borcik says, adding that this is especially true for starchy foods like white rice, white potat Continue reading >>

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

Is Avocado Good For Diabetes?

The humble avocado, shunned for years during the fat-free diet craze of the 1990s, may have finally hit its stride. No longer just for guacamole, this nutritious fruit is popping up as a healthy addition to various diet plans. But can people with diabetes eat this food? It turns out that avocados are not only safe for people with diabetes, but they may be downright beneficial. Research shows that avocados offer many ways to help people manage their diabetes and improve their overall well-being. Contents of this article: Diet and diabetes A healthy diet is critical for people with diabetes. The foods that they eat each day can have a considerable impact on how they feel and how well their diabetes is controlled. In general, people with diabetes should eat foods that help control blood sugar levels and that offer health benefits such lowering blood pressure and cholesterol. This is one of the best ways to keep diabetes under control, avoid complications, and lead the healthiest life possible. Avocados are an excellent choice for people with diabetes because they offer all these benefits - and possibly more. How do avocados affect blood sugar levels? Blood sugar control is critical for people who have diabetes. A physician or dietitian may advise patients to choose foods that are lower in carbohydrates and sugar. They may also recommend foods that help control blood sugar spikes. An avocado meets both of these requirements. According to the United States Department of Agriculture, an average medium avocado has around 17 grams of carbohydrates. For comparison, an apple has 25 grams of carbohydrates and a banana has 27. A 1-ounce serving, or about one-fifth of an avocado, contains only 3 grams of carbohydrates and less than 1 gram of sugar. With so few carbohydrates, people Continue reading >>

What To Eat If You Have Prediabetes

What To Eat If You Have Prediabetes

You get a call from your doctor telling you your sugar is a little high on your blood test. You don’t have diabetes but will need to watch it. You’re told to cut out sugar, bread and pasta. But now you are in a panic because you don’t know what to eat. Carbs are everywhere! Do you need to cut out carrots? Can you ever eat bread or pasta? And what about wine? The good news is that you can probably eat a lot more than you think. And if you make some lifestyle changes now, you may be able to prevent diabetes. Read my tips on what to do when you have prediabetes. Scary stats First, a few scary stats. We know diabetes is an epidemic. 29 million Americans have diabetes. But prediabetes is the real epidemic. 83 million people have it. This is 1 in 3 adults. And it’s even higher for adults ages 65 and older – the NIH estimates that 50% of older adults have prediabetes. And only 7% of people with prediabetes know they have it. Many of these people will go on to develop diabetes at some time in their life. But it doesn’t mean it’s inevitable! Insulin resistance Before moving on to my tips, I’d like to explain what it means to be insulin resistant as this occurs in most people with prediabetes and diabetes. When we eat carbohydrates, they break down into sugar in our blood. This happens with all carbs, including candy, juice, fruit, brown rice, potatoes, etc. In response to rising blood sugar levels, our pancreas secretes insulin in attempts to get the sugar out of the blood and into fat and muscle cells to be used as energy. Think of insulin like a “key” trying to unlock the doors to the cells. Sometimes the key isn’t able to unlock the doors because the cells have become resistant to the insulin (called insulin resistance). So the pancreas has to work in ov Continue reading >>

Prediabetic? These Foods Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels

Prediabetic? These Foods Help Lower Blood Sugar Levels

The number of people with Type 2 diabetes is climbing. But even if you aren’t a diabetic, everyone experiences a rise and fall in their blood sugar, depending on what they have had to eat or drink. If you are looking for snacks that will keep your blood sugar on an even keel, here are eight suggestions from Realage.com: • Walnuts are high in fiber, protein and unsaturated fat, so that means they are not only good for us nutritiously, but they are slowly digested. And new research hints that nuts might boost our insulin sensitivity — an added bonus. And regularly eating walnuts seems to improve “endothelial function” in people with diabetes. Endothelia, the cells lining your arteries, are one of the “first things to suffer when high blood sugar begins to wreak havoc in the body.” • Whole-grain crackers are slow to digest, which means blood sugar is released in a slow, steady manner. Add a bit of peanut butter on top and they will keep you filled up even longer. Up the ante even more by sprinkling cinnamon over the peanut butter (studies show cinnamon might lower blood sugar). • Hummus is even better than whole-grain crackers with peanut butter because the fiber in legumes might be even better for our blood sugar. Beans have more fiber and a lower glycemic index. • Avocado sliced in half, the pit removed and drizzled with balsamic vinegar is another top snack. Avocados are high in fiber and healthy fat, plus they have lots of potassium, which aids nerve function. • Sweet potato fries — the baked kind, not fried kind — have a lower glycemic index than other potatoes and that helps keep your blood sugar from spiking. And research shows their “high carotenoid content might be particularly useful in the blood sugar battle.” • Apple and pear sli Continue reading >>

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Just Diagnosed With Prediabetes Or Diabetes? 5 Easy Steps To Maintain Normal Blood Sugar

Save If you are one of the millions of people who has been diagnosed with prediabetes, diabetes, metabolic syndrome or any other form of “insulin resistance,” maintaining normal blood sugar levels can be challenging. Over the past several decades, these chronic disorders have swept through the U.S. and many other nations, reaching epidemic proportions and causing serious, but often preventable, side effects like nerve damage, fatigue, loss of vision, arterial damage and weight gain. The good news is that there are ways to prevent and even naturally reverse prediabetes and diabetes. Elevated blood sugar levels maintained for an extended period of time can push someone who is “prediabetic” into having full-blown diabetes (which now affects about one in every three adults in the U.S.). Even for people who aren’t necessarily at a high risk for developing diabetes or heart complications, poorly managed blood sugar can lead to common complications, including fatigue, weight gain and sugar cravings. In extreme cases, elevated blood sugar can even contribute to strokes, amputations, coma and death in people with a history of insulin resistance. Blood sugar is raised by glucose, which is the sugar we get from eating many different types of foods that contain carbohydrates. Although we usually think of normal blood sugar as being strictly reliant upon how many carbohydrates and added sugar someone eats, other factors also play a role. For example, stress can elevate cortisol levels, which interferes with how insulin is used, and the timing of meals can also affect how the body manages blood sugar. How to Maintain Normal Blood Sugar Most of the habits that help us maintain healthy, normal blood sugar levels are fairly obvious and simple to carry out. However, some might Continue reading >>

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

How Much Avocado Can A Diabetic Eat?

If you have diabetes, you know that food plays a big role in controlling your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrate--containing foods, which include sugar, sweets, sugary drinks, grains, starchy vegetables, fruits and some dairy, are converted to sugar during the digestion process and therefore contribute to raising your blood sugar levels after eating. A high--carb intake will result in high blood sugar levels. Video of the Day The nutrition facts for avocado depend on its size. For example, a whole California avocado provides about 227 calories, 11.8 grams of carbohydrates and 9.2 grams of fiber, while a Florida avocado is larger and contains 365 calories, 23.8 grams of carbohydrates and 17.0 grams of fiber. With diabetes, carbohydrates elevate your blood sugar levels, but only the starch and sugar part of the total carbohydrates, not the fiber. Available Carbohydrate and Diabetes To better estimate the effect of avocado on your blood sugar levels, you can calculate their available carbohydrate content by subtracting fiber from the total carbs. In the case of a California avocado, you get 2.6 grams of available carbohydrates, while a Florida avocado contains 6.8 grams of available carbohydates because of its larger size. Usually, diabetics are recommended to limit their carb intake to 45 grams to 60 grams per meal. Avocado contains very small amounts of available carbohydrates and are not problematic for diabetes control, even if you eat a whole, large avocado. Although avocado itself is not likely to hinder your glycemic control, it is often served with high-carb foods such as tortillas, nacho chips and taco shells. If your meal includes foods that have a high carbohydrate content, your blood sugar is likely to rise, so count your carbs to ensure you do not eat more carbo Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

The Best And Worst Foods For Your Prediabetes Diet Plan

Slide 1 of 10: Highly refined grains like bagels made from white flour and cereals are bad breakfast choices because they lack the fiber that blunts your blood sugar response. (Besides, some cereals are packed with sugar; you have to look at the nutrition label carefully.) You can still eat these on occasion, but you should aim to limit these in your diet, says Jill Weisenberger, RD, author of Diabetes Weight Loss Week By Week. Bacon also shouldn't be an 'everyday food,' she says. 'People think, 'oh, it doesn't have carbs,' but there are so many things about it that are not a good idea for prediabetics,' she says. For one, it's linked to colon cancer, something people with type 2 diabetes are already at an increased risk of. Continue reading >>

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Best Foods For Type 2 Diabetes

Avocado Avocado is high in monounsaturated fats, which are generally considered among the healthiest of fats. Researchers have found that a diet high in monounsaturated fats and low in low–quality carbs may improve insulin sensitivity. Monounsaturated fats also improve heart health — an especially important benefit for diabetics, who are at an increased risk for heart disease and stroke. Add a few thin slices of avocado to your sandwiches in place of mayonnaise, or mash a ripe avocado with cilantro, lime juice, and diced tomato for a delicious guacamole dip. Now that you know which foods can help control blood sugars, find out which ones can lead to terrible diabetes complications. Continue reading >>

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