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Autism Diabetes Jeopardy

Long-term Savings Plans Are In Jeopardy For Canadians With Disabilities

Long-term Savings Plans Are In Jeopardy For Canadians With Disabilities

This article has been updated in light of recent announcements from the CRA. Tom Jackman is an intelligent 41-year-old who spends most of his time volunteering. Not because hes spectacularly charitablethough there may be something to thatbut because he cant find steady work. He has a business administration diploma, and had worked at the local curling club in St. Johns, N.L., for the better part of the last 10 years, but right now, work is touch and go, says Jackman. Jackman was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, on the autism spectrum, when he was 29 years old. For the 12 years that followed, he had qualified for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC), which helped alleviate the financial burdens associated with his diagnosis, namely the cost of therapy and chronic underemployment. But back in March, the Canada Revenue Agency reviewed his eligibility for the credit and deemed him insufficiently disabled to receive the tax break. I dont think its fair, says Jackman, who chairs the advisory committee for adults on the spectrum at Autism Canada. If you have a condition, and it doesnt improve, or it doesnt change, I dont understand the [CRAs] reasons for taking away the credit. For me, nothings really changed. Jackman is among the droves of people recently claiming to have been denied the DTC after years of qualifying for the credit. Between Oct. 18 and Nov. 29, Autism Canada heard from 142 families who had run into challenges applying for or renewing their DTC. Meanwhile, Diabetes Canada estimates that 80 to 90 per cent of applications from people with Type 1 diabetesmany of whom formerly qualifiedhave had their claims denied since May. Earlier this week, the public learned the government had in fact changed the language for the DTC application forms, which critics say has contr Continue reading >>

Diabetic Jeopardy | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Diabetic Jeopardy | Spectrum | Autism Research News

Babies born to women with gestational diabetes tend to be large and go through spells of low blood sugar within their first few days of life. They may also be at an increased risk for autism , reports a new study published 22 September in the Journal of Autism and Developmental Disorders. The study found that the risk extends to children born to women who had diabetes prior to pregnancy. As pregnancy progresses, symptoms such as blurry vision, high blood pressure and weight loss along with an increased appetite sound an alarm that the woman may have gestational diabetes . The link between this condition and autism supports the notion that the period before and shortly after birth is a critical time for brain development. Harmful environmental influences , such as high levels of blood sugar in pregnant women or low blood sugar in children after birth, may disrupt it. Pregnant women with diabetes are known to have an increased risk of miscarriage , but until now researchers did not have comprehensive evidence that the condition ups the risk for autism. The new study reviewed 12 reports examining the link between diabetes during pregnancy and autism in the child. In nine of the studies, the researchers compared the birth histories of a group of children diagnosed with autism with those of controls matched for age and gender. The other three studies followed a group of children over time, identified those with autism and compared their birth histories with those of the others in the group. All of the studies indicated that children are more likely to have autism if their mothers had diabetes during pregnancy. Analysis of the first set of studies found that women with gestational diabetes double their risk of having a child with autism. Some of these studies did not differe Continue reading >>

Medicaid Cuts In Gop Healthcare Plans Put Kids' Coverage In Jeopardy - Business Insider

Medicaid Cuts In Gop Healthcare Plans Put Kids' Coverage In Jeopardy - Business Insider

A vertical stack of three evenly spaced horizontal lines. * Copyright 2018 Insider Inc. All rights reserved. Registration on or use of this site constitutes acceptance of our Marlee Stefanelli with her children, Matthew (who has Type 1 diabetes) and Isabella. Medicaid, a federal and state program that insures 74 million Americans, faces funding cuts under the Republican healthcare plan. People with children and parents who depend on Medicaid funding are worried. Business Insider spoke to a pair of moms whose children have diabetes or autism who've become more politically active to protest the Republican effort. When Marlee Stefanelli's son Matthew was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes, she didn't know she could use Medicaid to cover some of the costs of his treatment. Medicaid is usually thought of as an insurance program for the poor, and Stefanelli's family has health insurance, which they bought from the Affordable Care Act's insurance exchange in Pennsylvania. But while Stefanelli was at the hospital, a social worker told her about PH-95, a program in Pennsylvania that covers medical expenses for children regardless of their parent's income. It's funded by Medicaid. Stefanelli estimates the program covers about $1,800 worth of Matthew's expenses which can include insulin, blood glucose monitoring, and hospital visits a month. Her son's type of diabetes is incurable , and the idea that this coverage might be cut which would put her son's insurance at risk both now and once he's an adult has turned her into a political activist. "Everything is in jeopardy," Stefanelli said. A backer of Bernie Sanders in the Democratic primary and a supporter of Hillary Clinton in the general election, Stefanelli says she became more politically active after the 2016 election. She's now Continue reading >>

Aiden's Heroes- Autism Blog

Aiden's Heroes- Autism Blog

We have been taking Aiden to an Endocrinologist for high calciumlevels. As I was sitting in the waiting room for one of his appointments todaya question popped into my mind: Is there a link between Autism and diabetes?Our family has a history of diabetes and this disease is not uncommon in ourculture. That question has prompted this blog. Evidently I opened a door to a huge topic and large body ofresearch. Studies into diabetess affects on Autism are broken into two parts:a prenatal or gestational impact or an individual development of diabetes whilesuffering from Autism. First lets review exactly what diabetes is. Diabetes is a disease that affects themetabolism of sugars. That is why it is referred to as a metabolic disease inwhich the body does not properly process glucose (sugar). The development ofdiabetes is due to one of three cellular reasons: 1- not enough insulin isbeing produced by the body, 2- the body does not react properly to insulin, or3- both of these reasons combined. There are three types of diabetes: Type 1:Often referred to as juvenile diabetes,these individuals are insulin dependent for their entire lives. The onset ofthis disease is before the age of 40. Only about 10% of diabetes cases arerelated to type 1 diabetes. Type 2:This type of diabetes is usually due toone of the first two reasons listed above. Approximately 90% of diabetes casesare due to this type of diabetes. Overweight individuals have a much higherrisk of developing type 2 diabetes. This disease progressively gets worse overtime, but it is controllable and individuals may become insulin dependent as aresult. Gestational diabetes:This type of diabetes only affectspregnant women. It is caused when a woman's body is unable to process sugar,causing a progressive rise in sugars in the b Continue reading >>

Social Media Forces Insurance Company’s Hand

Social Media Forces Insurance Company’s Hand

As a parent you plan to give your children every opportunity to live a happy, healthy life as you spend each day watching them grow and learn. My 2-year-old son Colton was diagnosed with T1D on August 22, 2016. A few months later we received a diagnosis from a pediatric specialist that Colton had autism. The T1D diagnosis was a shock with a steep learning curve. The day-to-day struggle of carb counting, lunch packing, juice drinking and activity monitoring is enough to fatigue even then most devoted parent. On top of the near constant sugar checking, my wife and I were tasked to identify and monitor the signs and symptoms of a non-verbal 2-year-old with autism. After many sleepless nights struggling with lows and having many fights with Colton about injections, his endocrinologist agreed pump therapy could help managing his diabetes much more tolerable. A few concerns and red flags immediately popped up. Colton, for the most part is limited in his ability to alert us when he is facing a spike or a low. Compounding the issue is that without restraining him for a shot or waking him up for a correction in the middle of the night meant he was consistently running dangerously high. The second concern was that he will not tolerate loose clothing, belts or tubes touching his body. This limited our options drastically and helped us identify the Omnipod as best option for Colton. A short time later we began using the cordless pump and noticed a dramatic difference. We could manage his highs and lows from a distance without fighting a mercurial toddler, and more importantly turning Colton into a pin cushion. By using this pump we could issue a correction without an injection and without disturbing the precious moments when Colton is asleep. We were finally seeing some improvement Continue reading >>

From Sciencewriters: What Is

From Sciencewriters: What Is "jeopardy!"?

From ScienceWriters: What is "Jeopardy!"? From ScienceWriters: What is "Jeopardy!"? Submitted by Cybrarian on Thu, 10/15/2015 - 08:12 On March 10, at a massive sound stage here in the heart of Los Angeles, Alex Trebek stared down three contestants on the game show "Jeopardy!" The legendary host has presided over the TV show for 31 years, and that day he read off the following clue, which also appeared on a blue screen behind him: This condition has doubled in the last 30 years in U.S. kids & is linked to increased risk for diabetes. "Jeopardy!" famously phrases its clues as answers. Contestants win money if they are first to press their buzzer and can then come up with the matching question or lose money if they fail. After one contestant buzzed in and offered "What is autism?," Trebek swiftly rejected the response and turned to the next one to buzz in. That person earned Trebeks approval with: "What is obesity?" But this was a matter of science, which is both a mainstay of the show and among the trickiest territories it covers. Billy Wisse, head writer for "Jeopardy!" and one of the judges who sits on the set to evaluate nuances in responses, immediately got on the phone to his team of 15 writers and researchers, who sit about a city block from the sound stage. They watch the taping live and Google madly when a wrong response is plausible. Wisse soon asked a producer on the set to stop taping while his team figured out if autism was also linked to diabetes. [A minute and half later, Trebek says there is good news. The judges decided autism is an acceptable answer.] For those who have never seen an episode of "Jeopardy!" it debuted in 1964 and ranked number 45 on TV Guides list of the 60 greatest American television programs of all time this smart persons game show pre Continue reading >>

Long-term Savings Plans Are In Jeopardy For Canadians With Disabilities

Long-term Savings Plans Are In Jeopardy For Canadians With Disabilities

Long-term savings plans are in jeopardy for Canadians with disabilities News Diabetics will not be able to qualify for disability tax credit As a Conservative-era savings program is set to mature, Canadians with disabilities say the Liberals are barring them from tapping their funds This article has been updated in light of recent announcements from the CRA. Tom Jackman is an intelligent 41-year-old who spends most of his time volunteering. Not because hes spectacularly charitablethough there may be something to thatbut because he cant find steady work. He has a business administration diploma, and had worked at the local curling club in St. Johns, N.L., for the better part of the last 10 years, but right now, work is touch and go, says Jackman. Jackman was diagnosed with Asperger syndrome, on the autism spectrum, when he was 29 years old. For the 12 years that followed, he had qualified for the Disability Tax Credit (DTC), which helped alleviate the financial burdens associated with his diagnosis, namely the cost of therapy and chronic underemployment. But back in March, the Canada Revenue Agency reviewed his eligibility for the credit and deemed him insufficiently disabled to receive the tax break. I dont think its fair, says Jackman, who chairs the advisory committee for adults on the spectrum at Autism Canada. If you have a condition, and it doesnt improve, or it doesnt change, I dont understand the [CRAs] reasons for taking away the credit. For me, nothings really changed. Jackman is among the droves of people recently claiming to have been denied the DTC after years of qualifying for the credit. Between Oct. 18 and Nov. 29, Autism Canada heard from 142 families who had run into challenges applying for or renewing their DTC. Meanwhile, Diabetes Canada estimates th Continue reading >>

Nj Medical Research In Jeopardy [audio]

Nj Medical Research In Jeopardy [audio]

Medical research conducted at Rutgers, Princeton University and other institutions in New Jersey is in jeopardy under sequestration in Washington. Innovative studies that could lead to cures for life-threatening diseases are at risk as a result of cuts of 5 to 8 percent to the National Institutes of Health (NIH) and other agencies that award millions of dollars in grants to New Jersey. If a proposed budget for fiscal year 2014 goes through, those cuts could go even deeper, to 20 percent. "Sequestration has had a devastating impact already and it's only going to get worse," said Mary Woolley, president and CEO of Research!America . "Less research can be accomplished because not only has there been a cut this year, but the law requires cuts for the next nine years as well. Those cuts are coming on top of a whole period of flat or already cut funding for federal agencies like the National Institutes of Health, the Food and Drug Administration, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the National Science Foundation that fund the good research that taxpayers want to have taking place in New Jersey's premier institutions." Cuts have not yet reached the 20 percent level, but they are anticipated if the current proposal is voted on and approved by Congress. "New Jersey already has $12 million less in funding from the National Institutes of Health which means that scientists have been laid off or furloughed. It means that patients can't be admitted to some of the clinical trials that they are relying on for state-of-the-art medical practice based on research for the treatment of cancer and other diseases," said Woolley. "It means that young people who aspire to a career in science are being very discouraged with many giving up, choosing other lines of work or moving Continue reading >>

Final Jeopardy: Infamous (6-2-15)

Final Jeopardy: Infamous (6-2-15)

Todays Final Jeopardy question (6/2/2015), in the category Infamous was: Born in Illinois of Huguenot ancestry, he was executed in June 1882, a year after his heinous act. 5x champ Dan Feitel went over the $100K mark yesterday way over! He has now won $127,998. Today he takes on these two players:Tara Whittle, from Troy, NY; and Jacob Johnson, from Murray, UT. Round 1: Jacob found the Jeopardy! round Daily Double in Meanwhile Back at the Ranch under the $1,000 clue, with 4 clues left on the board. He was in second place with $2,800, $4,800 behind Dans lead. He made it a true Daily Double and he was RIGHT. Gauchos are the equivalent of cowboys on these vast grassy plains of South America. show Dan finished in the lead with $8,200. Jacob was second with $6,400 and Tara was last with $3,000. Round 2: Dan found the first Daily Double in Ziggurats under the $1,600 clue. He was in the lead with $15,000, $5,800 more than Jacob in second place. He bet $4,000 and guessed Ramses. That was WRONG. In the 500s B.C.this king who conquered Jerusalem restored the main ziggurat to Babylon. show Jacob found the last Daily Double in Hazardous to Your Health under the $1,200 clue. In second place with $9,600, he was $3,400 behind Dans lead. He bet $2,500 and he was RIGHT. In 2014 the CDC reported 4 total confirmations of this disease in the U.S.: the first was on September 30th. show This tight race ended with Dan in the lead with $16,600. Jacob was next with $14,100 and Tara was in third place with $8,600. Only ONE of the contestants got Final Jeopardy! right. When James A. Garfield was attacked on July 2, 1881, the nation was shocked, enraged, and captivated. President for just four months, Garfield was shot by Charles Guiteau as he was about to board a train at the Baltimore & Potomac Continue reading >>

Widespread Use Of Pesticides Is Creating A 'generation In Jeopardy,' Report Warns

Widespread Use Of Pesticides Is Creating A 'generation In Jeopardy,' Report Warns

UCare generously supports MinnPosts Second Opinion coverage; learn why . Widespread use of pesticides is creating a 'generation in jeopardy,' report warns The widespread use of pesticides in homes and on farms is undermining our childrens health. The widespread use of pesticides in homes and on farms is undermining our childrens health and creating a generation in jeopardy, according to a report released Wednesday by the California-based Pesticide Action Network (PAN). Children today are sicker than they were a generation ago, says the report. From childhood cancers to autism, birth defects and asthma, a wide range of childhood diseases and disorders are on the rise. Our assessment of the latest science leaves little room for doubt: pesticides are one key driver of this sobering trend. That assessment involved looking at dozens of studies published within the past five years that examined the effects of pesticides on childrens health. In the report, PAN describes the research linking pesticides to birth defects, early puberty and childhood cancers. The report also discusses the studies that have begun to associate pesticides with some of the recent rise in the incidence of childhood asthma, obesity and diabetes. But perhaps the most compelling evidence to date are the studies linking pesticides even at low doses to conditions that affect the brain and nervous system, such as autism and attention deficit hyperactivity (ADHD), as well as declines in IQ and increases in learning disabilities. The National Academy of Sciences now estimates that about one third of all neurobehavioral disorders (such as autism and ADHD) are caused either directly by pesticides and other chemicals or by interaction between environmental exposures and genetics, notes the report. Some experts s Continue reading >>

Man With Autism Fulfills Dream By Competing On Jeopardy

Man With Autism Fulfills Dream By Competing On Jeopardy

Man with Autism Fulfills Dream By Competing on Jeopardy Kelvin Smith has been trying to compete on the gameshow, Jeopardy, for ten years. And just recently, his dream was finally fulfilled. For him, it was an experience of a lifetime. Adrenalin was pumping through me and I loved it, I loved every moment of it, he said . The episode in which he competed aired in the afternoon of November 2. He may not have won the competition, but in the eyes of many, he was still a winner. Smith was diagnosed with autism at the age of ten, and he hopes the fulfillment of his dream serves to encourage others with the spectrum disorder. Its a good message to send to other people with autism to know that you can do this, you can do this, he said. For the Birmingham, Alabama, native, success is no stranger to him. In addition to having fulfilled his dream of competing on Jeopardy, he is pursuing his doctorate studies in Chemical and Biomolecular Engineering at Georgia Tech in Atlanta. He also hopes to someday to create a nonprofit for other autistic students interested in STEM fields (science, technology, engineering, and math). In order to prepare for the competition on Jeopardy, he researched how past champions studied and got themselves ready for their appearance on the show. Smith credits most of his success and achievement of his dreams to his mom; she knew he was a special kid from the time he learned his times 12 multiplication tables at the tender age of two years old. Check out the video below to learn more about this driven man and the fulfillment of his lifelong dream! Continue reading >>

Tuesday, June 2, 2015 Game Recap & Discussion [spoilers]

Tuesday, June 2, 2015 Game Recap & Discussion [spoilers]

A message board for fans of the Jeopardy! television show. An Anonymous Benefactor is our JBoardie of the Month! Tara Whittle , a strategy consultant from Troy, New York Jacob Johnson , an actor from Murray, Utah Dan Feitel , an attorney originally from Gillette, New Jersey (whose 5-day cash winnings total $99,198) Alex: Thank you, Johnny Gilbert, and you, too, ladies and gentlemen. He's young and so far, he's unstoppable, averaging over $25,000 for each of his 5 wins. But today, look at the determination on the face of Tara and Jacob. They're ready for him. Or are they? We'll find out. Let's go to work. Good luck to all three of you. Now the categories for this first round today... MEANWHILE BACK AT THE RANCH (4/5, including 1 correct Daily Double) Jeopardy! Round Potential Lach Trash : $1,000 Alex: Every time the winter Olympics come around, I get all enthused about curling. And I start thinking, "Gosh, I would love to open a curling rink in Southern California." Because I think it's a great sport. Alex: Tara Whittle, you think it's a great sport also. Tara: I do, too. I--that's exactly how I got into it is watching the Olympics and I thought, you know, "Let me check this out." And went to the Internet and saw there was a club. And got right into it and I'm hooked and, you know, if you open up a curling rink, I'll be there. Alex: Now you know, of course, that not only is the sport good, but the camaraderie and the socializing-- Alex: --associated with curling is fun also. Tara: Absolutely. We say that it's a sheet of ice with a bar, but sometimes it's a bar with a sheet of ice. Alex: Jacob Johnson is an actor from Murray, Utah, who has appeared in over 450 performances of a play that none of us knows anything about. Jacob: Well, you don't really know--need to know an Continue reading >>

Don't Be Distracted: The Real Issues In Autism Are Threats To Funding, Services, Say Experts

Don't Be Distracted: The Real Issues In Autism Are Threats To Funding, Services, Say Experts

Follow all of ScienceDaily's latest research news and top science headlines ! Don't be distracted: The real issues in autism are threats to funding, services, say experts Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health With so much focus in recent months on the scientifically discredited notion that childhood vaccines cause autism, the real threats to health care and services for people with autism and other disabilities arent being given enough attention, argue two leading health policy experts. With so much focus in recent months on the scientifically discredited notion that childhood vaccines cause autism, the real threats to health care and services for people with autism and other disabilities aren't being given enough attention, argue two leading health policy experts. "President Donald Trump's apparent openness to a long-debunked link between vaccines and autism risks encouraging Americans to stop vaccinating their children, posing a serious public health threat," the researchers write in the March 9 issue of the New England Journal of Medicine. "Meanwhile, renewed attention to disproven theories about autism may be distracting us from growing threats to essential policies that support the health and well-being of people with autism or other disabilities." The piece is authored by Colleen L. Barry, PhD, MPP, Fred and Julie Soper Professor and Chair of the Department of Health Policy and Management at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, and David S. Mandell, ScD, Professor and Director of the Center for Mental Health Policy and Services at the University of Pennsylvania. If advocates and policymakers are focused on defending long-settled science, Barry says, they may not have the bandwidth to consider the potential consequences of efforts to roll Continue reading >>

Painful Eyes? Your Vision May Be In Jeopardy

Painful Eyes? Your Vision May Be In Jeopardy

Painful eyes? Your vision may be in jeopardy Do your eyes sting or burn? Are they more uncomfortable when you are in air conditioning, forced heat, after a day of looking at the computer or after a nights sleep? If so, you likely have dry eyes. Dry eyes, or in medical terminology, keratoconjunctivitis sicca (ker-uh-toe-kun-junk-tih-VY-tis SIK-uh), occurs when your tears are not able to provide enough lubrication for your eyes, and you produce poor-quality tears, or your tears evaporate. Dr. Michael Weisberg , an ophthalmologist with Advocate Trinity Hospital in Chicago, says his patients with dry eyes typically mention the following symptoms during their initial evaluation: A stinging, burning or scratchy sensation in the eyes A sensation of having something in the eyes Pain or gritty sensation upon opening eyes after sleep Blurred or fluctuating vision and eye fatigue Watery eyes (which happens when the body overcompensates for dry eyes) Aging. Tear production tends to diminish as you get older. Dry eyes are common in people over 50. Medical conditions, including diabetes, rheumatoid arthritis, lupus , scleroderma , Sjogrens syndrome , thyroid disorders and vitamin A deficiency. Certain medications, including antihistamines, decongestants, hormone replacement therapy, antidepressants, and drugs for high blood pressure, acne, birth control and Parkinsons disease . Tear gland damage from inflammation or radiation. Being a woman. Dry eyes are more common in women. Hormonal changes due to pregnancy, using birth control pills or menopause are major reasons. Not blinking enough, which usually occurs when you are concentrating at work or while driving. Eyelid problems, such as out-turning of the lids (ectropion) and in-turning of the lids (entropion). Environmental factors l Continue reading >>

Jeopardy! Recap For Tue., Jun. 2 : Jeopardy

Jeopardy! Recap For Tue., Jun. 2 : Jeopardy

Jeopardy! recap for Tue., Jun. 2 - Champ Dan got off to a very fast start to lead by $4,400 at the first break, but Jacob cut into that margin by doubling up on DD1. DD1 - Back at the Ranch - Gauchos are the equivalent of cowboys on these vast grassy plains of South America Dan had opened his advantage up to $5,800 but then lost $4,000 on DD2, while Jacob added $2,500 on DD3, setting up a tight duel for first position right to the end of DJ. DD2 - Ziggurats - In the 500s B.C. this king who conquered Jerusalem restored the main ziggurat of Babylon DD3 - Hazardous to your Health - In 2014 the CDC reported 4 total confirmations of this disease in the U.S.; the first was on September 30th Jacob held a small lead very late in the round, but Dan picked up the last two clues to pull ahead with a score of $16,600 vs. $14,100 for Jacob and Tara with $8,600 moving into this Final: Infamous - Born in Illinois of Huguenot ancestry, he was executed in June 1882, a year after his heinous act After Jacob was revealed to be correct on FJ, Alex noted that Dan was shaking his head as the time to write down a response ran out, meaning that his reign as champion was over. Jacob won with $17,201, while Dan, with five victories, will likely be back for the next Tournament of Champions. This Day in Trebekistan: In a TV category, for some reason Alex initially ruled Jacob correct when he responded with "Archer" to a clue about "The Blacklist". Weird. Correct Qs:DD1 - What are pampas?DD2 - Who was Nebuchadnezzar?DD3 - What is Ebola?FJ - Who was Charles Guiteau? Continue reading >>

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