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Autism And Type 2 Diabetes

Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes In Adolescents And Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

Risk Of Developing Type 2 Diabetes In Adolescents And Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study.

Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study. Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan [email protected] [email protected] Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Department of Psychiatry, College of Medicine, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. School of Traditional Chinese Medicine, Chang Gung University, Taoyuan, Taiwan Research Center for Industry of Human Ecology, Chang Gung University of Science and Technology, Taoyuan, Taiwan Liver Research Center, Division of Hepatology, Department of Gastroenterology and Hepatology, Chang Gung Memorial Hospital, Taoyuan, Taiwan. Department of Psychiatry, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan. Department of Family Medicine, Taipei Veterans General Hospital, Taipei, Taiwan Institute of Hospital and Health Care Administration, National Yang-Ming University, Taipei, Taiwan. Diabetes Care. 2016 May;39(5):788-93. doi: 10.2337/dc15-1807. Epub 2016 Mar 22. OBJECTIVE: Studies have suggested the association between autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM)-related risk factors, such as obesity and dyslipidemia. However, the association between ASD and type 2 DM remains unknown. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS: We used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database for enrolling 6,122 adolescents and young adults with ASD and 24,488 age- and sex-matched control subjects between 2002 and 2009 and monitored them until the end of 2011. Participants who developed type 2 DM during the follow-up period were identified. RESULTS: Adolescents (hazar Continue reading >>

Common Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Could Aid Autism

Common Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Could Aid Autism

Common Type 2 Diabetes Treatment Could Aid Autism A wonder drug commonly used to treat diabetes may be capable of treating autism. According to a recent study, metformin the most widely-used drug to treat type 2 diabetes improved social, behavioral and morphological defects in mice models with Fragile X syndrome, an inherited form of intellectual disability and a cause of some forms of autism. Fragile X syndrome, the genetic disease brought on by defects in the Fragile X Mental Retardation 1 gene (FMR1), triggers an excess production of protein in the brain, as well as a dysregulated connections between neurons and changes in behavior. It leads to impairments in speech, language, behavior, and social interaction, and is frequently co-diagnosed with autism, anxiety disorders, and seizures. The mice models whose symptoms of Fragile X syndrome include increased grooming and decreased socialization showed normal brain connections and behavioral patterns of ten days of metformin injections. The genetic disease that affects about 1 in every 5,000 boys and 1 in every 6,000 girls does not have a cure. Co-senior author of the study and James McGill University Biochemistry Department professor Nahum Sonenberg (pictured), PhD, called the study some of the most exciting research work in my career. Sonenberg described metformin as a wonder drug because of its recently-found potential in treating forms of cancer, cardiovascular diseases, neurological diseases and aging. Jean-Claude Lacaille, a major collaborator in the study and Canada Research Chair in Molecular Neurophysiology and professor in University of Montreals Department of Neurosciences, said the drugs well-documented safety can push their research towards a quick clinical phase. This makes the drug an ideal candidate for Continue reading >>

Autism Spectrum Disorder Associated With Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Autism Spectrum Disorder Associated With Increased Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Autism spectrum disorder associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes 1. In a retrospective review of over 30 000 adolescents and young adults, patients with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) demonstrated significantly higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes (T2DM) compared to healthy controls 2. This increased risk of T2DM among patients with ASD remained significant after adjusting for atypical antipsychotic use and other medical comorbidities Evidence Rating Level: 3 (Average) Study Rundown: ASD is a neurological disorder consisting of diminished interaction, communication, cognition, and increased repetitive behavior. Previous studies have recognized the association between ASD and metabolic syndrome risk factors such as obesity and dyslipidemia. However, there is limited information on the association between ASD and T2DM. The purpose of this study was to explore this potential association in a large population database. The study analyzed the health outcomes of over 6000 adolescents and young adults with ASD and 24 000 age- and sex-matched controls. At the conclusion of the study, individuals with ASD demonstrated a significantly higher risk of developing T2DM compared to healthy controls. This risk remained significant after adjustments for patient demographics, atypical antipsychotic use, as well as other medical comorbidities. Furthermore, the use of atypical antipsychotics was independently associated with an increased risk of T2DM in this patient population. The study is limited by the retrospective nature of the data, which lacks important confounding information including ASD severity, family history, and personal lifestyle. Additionally, the data is collected from a single country in Asia, and may not be generalizable to other ethnic populations. This Continue reading >>

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Teenagers and young adults with autism are about three times more likely than those without the condition to develop type 2 diabetes, according to one of the largest studies of autism and diabetes to date1. The findings, published in March in Diabetes Care, add to mounting evidence that people with autism face a long list of chronic health problems. Type 2 diabetes, which often goes hand-in-hand with obesity — associated with a subset of autism cases — can lead to heart disease and stroke, as well as nerve and kidney damage. “We really need effective interventions for these adolescents and young adults to turn the tide and hopefully prevent the development of type 2 diabetes,” says Meredith Dreyer Gillette, associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, who was not involved in the study. About 32 percent of young children with autism are overweight and 16 percent are obese, compared with 23 percent and 10 percent of typically developing children, respectively2. Certain genetic risk factors for autism, such as deletions on chromosome 16, are also tied to weight problems. Women who are obese or have diabetes while pregnant are more likely to have children with autism. The prevalence of diabetes among individuals with autism, however, has been less clear. A study last year found an increased risk of diabetes — as well as many other chronic health problems — among adults with autism, possibly stemming from a lack of access to preventive care3. Diabetes data: To probe this link more deeply, a team of researchers in Taiwan identified 6,122 adolescents and young adults with autism and more than 24,000 controls with no history of diabetes in the country’s National Health Insurance Research Database. The researchers could not be reache Continue reading >>

Pregnancy-related Diabetes Has Possible Link To Autism

Pregnancy-related Diabetes Has Possible Link To Autism

Pregnancy-Related Diabetes Has Possible Link to Autism For every 1,000 mothers who develop gestational diabetes by 26 weeks, seven children may develop autism spectrum disorders, a study finds By Cari Nierenberg , LiveScience on April 15, 2015 As many as 9.2percent of women in the United States get gestational diabetes during pregnancy, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Credit: Credit: PearlsofJannah via Flickr Women who develop gestational diabetes early in their pregnancy have a higher chance of having a child with autism than women who don't develop the condition, a new study suggests. Researchers found that mothers-to-be who developed gestational diabetes high blood sugar during pregnancy in women who have never had diabetes by their 26th week of pregnancy were 63 percent more likely to have a child diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) compared with women who did not have gestational diabetes at any point during their pregnancy (and who also did not have type 2 diabetes prior to pregnancy). The finding does not mean that autism is common among children born to women who had gestational diabetes. "Autism is still rare," said study co-author Anny Xiang, a research scientist at Kaiser Permanente Southern California in Pasadena. The findings show that, although the risk of having a child with autism is still low among women who have gestational diabetes early in pregnancy (before 26 weeks), the study did find a relationship between these women and an increased risk that the child would have autism, Xiang said. [ 7 Ways Pregnant Women Affect Babies ] The study, published today (April 14) in the Journal of the American Medical Association, looked at more than 320,000 children born in Southern California between 1995 and 2009. About Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism: Is There A Link?

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism: Is There A Link?

Response to Freeman et al. In a recent issue of Diabetes Care, Freeman et al. (1) discussed a possible link between type 1 diabetes and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Their data suggested that the prevalence of ASD in nearly 1,000 children with type 1 diabetes may be greater than that in the general population. We investigated the presence of ASD in 5,178 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age ≤14 years from the Prospective Childhood Diabetes Registry of Finland. Children with type 1 diabetes were born between 1980 and 2000. The data were linked to the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register (HDR) by the end of the year 2003 using the unique personal identity number that is assigned to all residents of Finland. We included autism, Asperger disorder, pervasive developmental disorder–not otherwise specified, Rett’s syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder in the diagnosis of ASD (2). We also linked the data of mothers of ASD cases to the HDR and reviewed hospital records in order to find out pregnancy and delivery complications related as potential risk factor for subsequent ASD in the child. Seven cases with type 1 diabetes fulfilled the criteria of ASD, giving a cumulative incidence of 1.35/1,000 (95% CI 0.5–2.8). The cumulative incidence of ASD did not differ from that in the background population. The cumulative incidence of ASD was 1.39/1,000 (1.2–1.57) at age 18 years in northern Finland (3). There was male excess in ASD; five of seven cases were boys. Perinatal risk factors were present in five cases of ASD; some of them had several: asphyxia during delivery was present in two cases, umbilical cord around the neck in three cases, and excess bleeding during delivery in two cases, of which one had asphyxia and one had umbilical cord around ne Continue reading >>

Autism + Diabetes?

Autism + Diabetes?

We're always hearing the scary warnings that the rate of diabetes is increasing dramatically. Here's another scary statistic: 1 in 88 children is diagnosed with autism each year. April is National Autism Awareness Month, so we wanted to take some time to highlight not just autism, but the relationship between autism and diabetes... if there is one. If you're not familiar with autism (or "Autism Spectrum Disorder" known as ASD), it's actually a wide-spectrum disorder, meaning people diagnosed with it will have their condition manifest in different ways. From "high-functioning" autism, like Asperger's Syndrome, to "low-functioning" autism, which can leave people nonverbal, people with this disorder often have communication issues, behavioral issues, and sensory issues. Many with autism can have an unusual interest in repetitive behaviors, from schedules to activities to food. You all saw the movie Rain Man, right? About 40 percent of people on the spectrum have above average intelligence, yet about 25 percent are completely nonverbal. There isn't a lot of published information about diabetes and autism, and much of what we found was from effected families themselves. But often, folks living "in the trenches" are the best sources of information about what life with two chronic conditions is really like. Proof of a Type 1 / Autism Link? The first thing we wondered was whether or not there is any proven link between autism and diabetes, especially since the diagnosis of both conditions is on the rise. Many parents also wonder, sometimes because the families are dealing with both diabetes and autism, but not necessarily in the same child. The medical world does not seem consensus to offer. A 2006 study in Finland came to the conclusion that there is no link between autism and Continue reading >>

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Teens With Autism At Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Those taking atypical antipsychotics also showed a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. HealthDay News Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online March 22 in Diabetes Care. Mu-Hong Chen, MD, from the Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to identify 6122 adolescents and young adults with ASD and 24 488 age- and sex-matched control subjects (2002 to 2009). Patients were monitored until the end of 2011 to identify those who developed T2DM. The researchers found that adolescents (hazard ratio [HR], 2.71) and young adults (HR, 5.31) with ASD had a higher risk of developing T2DM versus those without ASD, after adjusting for demographic data, use of atypical antipsychotics, and medical comorbidities. There was also a higher likelihood of subsequent T2DM tied to short-term (HR, 1.97) and long-term (HR, 1.64) use of atypical antipsychotics. "Further research is necessary to investigate the common pathophysiology of ASD and T2DM," the authors wrote. Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Metformin, Autism (aspergers) And Autism Related Digestive Problems - Any Contradictions With Meform | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Metformin, Autism (aspergers) And Autism Related Digestive Problems - Any Contradictions With Meform | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 Metformin, Autism (Aspergers) and Autism related digestive problems - any contradictions with Meform Hi all, I'm new here, and I'm new to Type 2 Diabetes. I am also Autistic - (higher functioning autism - Aspergers) which has amongst its characteristics problems with digestion. I am thus, since 15 years old (I am now 53) am Lactose Intolerant, IBS, (irritable bowel syndrome) since August 1980 - it comes and goes. My question for you all is if Metformin, especially in its slow release format, would have minimal side effects like diahorrea? (I would like to try to avoid that). I just want to get my 'energy' and 'stamina' back like it was some few years ago (pre 2014). Any ideas and or suggestions please? I would be most grateful. Thank you. Sincerely and with respect. Ramon Hartopp-Sancho (Ramon1965) I'll tag in @daisy1 for her intro about how a lot of us control our blood sugars. I had a very bad experience with Metformin so am probably not the best person to ask. I did find however that by changing what I ate I could get very good control of my blood sugar levels. Have a read through Daisy's post when she puts it up and come back with any questions you may have. The forum is a very helpful space with lots of experienced posters who are very welcoming and helpful. Hi all, I'm new here, and I'm new to Type 2 Diabetes. I am also Autistic - (higher functioning autism - Aspergers) which has amongst its characteristics problems with digestion. I am thus, since 15 years old (I am now 53) am Lactose Intolerant, IBS, (irritable bowel syndrome) since August 1980 - it comes and goes. My question for you all is if Metformin, especially in its slow release Continue reading >>

Questioning Answers: Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Autism

Questioning Answers: Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes In Autism

News and views on autism research and other musings. "Adolescents and young adults with ASD[autism spectrum disorder]were more likely to develop type 2 DM[ type 2 diabetes mellitus ]during the follow-up. In addition, those with ASD using atypical antipsychotics exhibited a high risk. Therefore, further research is necessary to investigate the common pathophysiology of ASD and type 2 DM." So said the findings reported by Mu-Hong Chen and colleagues [1] as, yet again , Taiwan and their very useful National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD) continues to give to autism and related research. Type 2 diabetes - the one where the pancreas don't produce enough insulin or the body's cells don't react to insulin - was the focus of NHIRD interrogation this time around, following in the scientific footsteps of previous research looking at both type 1 and type 2 diabetes in relation to autism ( see here ). Enrolling over 6,000 adolescents and young adults diagnosed with an autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and nearly 25,000 age and sex-matched controls "between 2002 and 2009", researchers followed participants until the end of 2011 watching for who and how many would be diagnosed with type 2 DM. Dividing groups into adolescents and young adults, researchers reported that those diagnosed with autism were at "higher risk of developing type 2 DM than those without ASD" after adjusting for various potential forms of bias including "atypical antipsychotics use, and medical comorbidities." Further: "Short-term... and long-term... use of atypical antipsychotics were associated with a higher likelihood of subsequent type 2 DM." Ergo, yet another important, growing and potentially life-changing comorbidity appears to be 'over-represented' when it comes to the label of autism. Accepting Continue reading >>

The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

The Simple Test Which May Help Prevent Autism

A new hypothesis states that impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia may be a common underlying mechanism of type 2 diabetes and autism Emerging research also suggests strong links between gut flora and both diabetes and brain disorders such as autism. The primary key to maintaining both healthy gut flora and optimal insulin levels is a low-fructose, low-carb diet, high in nutrient-dense whole foods Gut and Psychology Syndrome (GAPS) is the result of poorly developed or imbalanced gut flora, which can have a disastrous effect on mental health and brain development and function. Interestingly, children who do not develop normal gut flora from birth also appear to be particularly prone to vaccine damage, and this knowledge may be a MAJOR key for reducing vaccine injuries, including autism GAPS can be easily identified within the first weeks of your baby's life by analyzing his stool to determine the state of his gut flora, and a urine test to check for metabolites. These tests will provide a picture of the state of your child's immune system. If your child has abnormal gut flora, he will be more prone to vaccine damage, so avoiding inoculations until the metabolic characteristics of GAPS have been reversed is highly recommended By Dr. Mercola A review of genetic and biochemical abnormalities has revealed a possible link between autism and type 2 diabetes. It's still only a hypothesis, but according to Rice University biochemist Michael Stern, author of the opinion paper, these two conditions may have a common underlying mechanism: impaired glucose tolerance and hyperinsulinemia. Hyperinsulinemia, a common precursor to insulin resistance, is characterized by excess levels of insulin in your bloodstream. Insulin resistance, in turn, is associated with type 2 diabete Continue reading >>

Autism May Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Autism May Increase Type 2 Diabetes Risk

Autism (also known as autism spectrum disorder or ASD) is a brain disorder that causes varying levels of difficulty with social interactions, communication, and behavior. People with ASD often have health problems that increase their risk of type 2 diabetes, such as obesity (being overweight) and having high amounts of fat in the blood (a condition called dyslipidemia). Does this mean theres a link between ASD and type 2 diabetes? This study sought to answer that question. From 2002 to 2009, over 30,000 young people between the ages of 10 and 28 enrolled in the study: 6,122 with autism but not diabetes and 24,488 with neither diabetes nor autism. In 2011, the researchers compared the two groups to see which group developed type 2 diabetes at a higher rate. The authors of the study found that the young people with autism were more likely to develop type 2 diabetes and that the risk continued into later life. The risk of diabetes went up even further among those who were taking psychiatric medications. Kids with autism should be closely monitored by their doctors, who can track their body weight and the level of fat in their blood. This may help prevent or delay the development of diabetes. Other health factors, such as blood pressure, BMI (a ratio of weight to height), and family health historyall of which can play a role in the development of diabeteswere not covered by this study. Risk of Developing Type 2 Diabetes in Adolescents and Young Adults With Autism Spectrum Disorder: A Nationwide Longitudinal Study. Mu-Hong Chen, Wen-Hsuan Lan, Ju-Wei Hsu, et al. Diabetes Care May 2016, 39 (5) 788-793; The information on this screen does not take the place of care from your doctor or other health care provider. If you have general questions about diabetes or diabetes-related Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Type 2 Diabetes: The Silent Killer

Diabetes is an epidemic. Currently, 29.1 million people or 9.3% of the population have diabetes. And that percentage seems to be growing. In the Pajaro Valley community, type 2 diabetes is a big problem. Some estimates show that two-thirds of individuals living in the area will eventually be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. For this reason, the community, with the help of diabetes educators and nurses, are doing what they can to help raise awareness for the problem. The goal is to help more people understand this condition, including what causes it, what it is, and how it is treated. Currently, there are an abundance of readily available options for not-so-healthy food. This makes it incredibly important to for individuals to make lifestyle changes, from choosing healthier meals, to incorporating exercise into their daily routines. In the video below, students, teachers, and diabetes educators describe and discuss the health issues that are currently plaguing their community. In addition to offering some healthy tips for preventing diabetes in your own community, you might find there are some things you can relate to. Take a look, and let us know what you think in the comments below! Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Help Symptoms Of Autism Associated Condition

Diabetes Drug May Help Symptoms Of Autism Associated Condition

Metformin, a widely used diabetes medication, could help peoplewith a common inherited form of autism, research shows. Scientists found that metformin improves sociability and reducessymptomatic behaviours in adult mice with a form of Fragile Xsyndrome. Researchers say that metformin could be repurposed as a therapyfor Fragile X syndrome within a few years - if clinical trialsprove successful. Fragile X syndrome is caused by inherited defects in a genecalled FMR1, which leads to excess protein production in thebrain. This results in the breakdown of connections between braincells, leading to changes in behaviour. The team led by the University of Edinburgh and McGillUniversity in Canada looked at the effects of metformin on micethat lack the FMR1 gene. These mice usually have symptoms consistent with Fragile Xsyndrome - they exhibit repetitive behaviours such as increasedgrooming and do not socialise with other mice. After mice had treatment with metformin for ten days, proteinproduction in the brain returned to typical levels, brainconnections were repaired and they displayed normal behaviourpatterns, the researchers found. The therapy also reduced the occurrence of seizures, which arereported to affect between 10 and 20 per cent of people withFragile X. Fragile X Syndrome affects around 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 6,000girls. It is the most common known cause of inherited intellectualdisability. Affected children have developmental delays that impairspeech and language, problems with social interactions and areoften co-diagnosed with autism, anxiety and seizures. Metformin is already approved by the UK's Medicines andHealthcare products Regulatory Agency and the US Food and DrugAdministration as a therapy for type 2 diabetes. Dr. Christos Gkogkas, Chancellor's Fellow at Continue reading >>

Autism And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Autism And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Autism and Diabetes: What You Need to Know Autism and diabetes are two very different conditions. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological disorder characterized by social impairments, repetitive behaviors, and struggles with verbal and nonverbal communication. Diabetes, on the other hand, is a disease in which the immune system either kills off insulin-producing cells (type 1) or the body becomes resistant to insulin (type 2). But could these two very different conditions be somehow connected? Research is beginning to indicate that the answer to that question is yes. And while there are certainly challenges that come from having both of them at the same time, there are ways in which autism can actually make certain aspects of diabetes management easier. Recent research ventures have found that individuals with autism have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The largest study to date that investigated this link took place in Taiwan and was published in 2016. Between the years 2002 and 2009, The researchers examined 30,610 people total , all of whom were ages 10 to 29. 6,122 of them had ASD and not diabetes, whereas the remaining 24,488 had neither condition and served as controls for the study. In 2011, researchers evaluated their data to see how many people had developed type 2 diabetes and whether there appeared to be an increased rate in one group or the other. It turned out that 1.6 percent of the autistic population developed type 2 diabetes, whereas the rate for the control group was a mere 0.4 percent. In other words, autistic people were at significantly higher risk of type 2 than neurotypical (non-autistic) people. So why the increased rates? There are likely several factors at play. While obesity is certainly not the only factor b Continue reading >>

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