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Autism And Diabetes Treatment

Evidence Mounts For Possible Link Between Autism And Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

Evidence Mounts For Possible Link Between Autism And Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

While the causes of autism remain unknown, new evidence suggests that a child may be more likely to develop the condition if their mother had type 2 diabetes, was obese or had high blood pressure. Researchers from the University of California, Davis found a strong association between maternal diabetes and childhood autism, according to HealthDay News. They reported their findings at the International Society for Autism Research meeting, which was recently held in San Diego, California. Their findings came from analyzing data collected from 1,000 children who either had autism, suffered from another developmental disorder or were developing normally. "For mothers with at least one of the three conditions, their children had a 60 percent increased risk of autism and for developmental delays, there was a 150 percent increased risk," said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, deputy director of the Medical Investigations of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of California, Davis, according to the news source. Additionally, regardless of an official autism diagnosis, children of women with type 2 diabetes tended to have poorer expressive language skills than individuals born to healthy parents. The study is not the first to note a connection between autism and impaired metabolic function. A 2005 study published in the journal Diabetes Care found that young people with type 1 diabetes were significantly more likely to also be diagnosed with autism. The researchers from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto speculated that a common autoimmune disorder may be behind the association between the two conditions. They said that their findings underscore the importance of understanding the connection between impaired metabolic function and type 1 diabetes. With a better understandin Continue reading >>

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Nine years ago, when I was first consulting with obstetricians who specialize in high risk pregnancies to talk about my wish to get pregnant, not one of the three doctors whom I visited mentioned any connection between a mother having Type 1 diabetes and her child having autism spectrum disorder. I can’t blame those doctors; it is only in the last few years, as more research is being conducted to try and figure out the current autism epidemic, that such a link has been found. Autism is a complex neurological disorder that affects the connections between various regions of the brain, impacting a person’s ability to produce and process language and to read the nonverbal social cues that are an otherwise intuitive part of human communication. Autism is considered to be a spectrum disorder because it affects people in a range of ways, from most severe impairment to a more mild condition known as Asperger syndrome. Wherever a person falls on the autism spectrum, living with a neurological challenge is not an easy thing. My seven-year-old son was diagnosed with mild autism at age three. His diagnosis came after a few years of visiting different specialists who were investigating his speech delay. The first specialists we visited, along with our pediatrician who saw my son frequently, dismissed autism because of my son’s smiling and natural interaction with me. Now doctors know more — that children with autism easily relate to their loved ones and want to connect with others; it is not the desire to be isolated that makes people with autism engage in repetitive behaviors. Rather, that behavior comes out of seeking safety and soothing in a world that is too often too loud and confusing. I know this behavior well from when my son gets overwhelmed. Eventually we received Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Metformin Shows Promise In Treating One Form Of Autism

Diabetes Drug Metformin Shows Promise In Treating One Form Of Autism

Diabetes drug metformin shows promise in treating one form of autism The diabetes drug metformin relieved behavioral symptoms in mouse models of fragile X syndrome. Metformin has been helping patients with Type 2 diabetes control their blood sugar for more than two decades, but now researchers led by McGill University are investigating a new use for the drug: to treat fragile X syndrome, which causes some forms of autism. Mouse models of fragile X show many of the telltale symptoms of the disease, including a lack of socialization. But within 10 days of being injected with metformin, their brain connections and behaviors were normal, according to a press release from the university. The research was published in the journal Nature Communications. Fragile X is an inherited genetic disorder that causes excess protein production in the brain and improper connections between neurons. The disease impairs speech, behavior and social interactions and sometimes coexists with anxiety and seizures. Like this story? Subscribe to FierceBiotech! Biopharma is a fast-growing world where big ideas come along daily. Our subscribers rely on FierceBiotech as their must-read source for the latest news, analysis and data in the world of biotech and pharma R&D. Sign up today to get biotech news and updates delivered to your inbox and read on the go. The researchers observed that metformin restores molecular pathways that become disrupted by the defective gene, called the fragile X mental retardation 1 gene (FMR1), according to the release. Theyre still trying to figure out exactly how the drug acts on those pathways, but their evidence suggests it may work in other forms of autism, too. Autism is one of many medical conditions that scientists believe could be addressed with metformin. Obser Continue reading >>

Can Early Control Of Gestational Diabetes Reduce Autism Risk?

Can Early Control Of Gestational Diabetes Reduce Autism Risk?

New study advances understanding of when and how diabetes in pregnancy contributes to autism; implications for prenatal care Diabetes that develops early in pregnancy increases the risk of autism by 40 percent, according to a large new study of more than 320,000 children and their mothers. The increased risk may stem from the effects of uncontrolled high blood sugar during a critical window of early brain development, the investigators suggest. Their report appears today in the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA). “While the increased risk of autism in this study is modest, the findings add to the growing body of research showing that pregnancy is particularly sensitive period for children’s brain development,” comments epidemiologist Michael Rosanoff, Autism Speaks director for public health research. To provide perspective, the increased autism risk seen with early gestational diabetes translated into roughly seven additional cases per 1,000 pregnancies. “Rather than spark anxiety, the findings should underscore the importance of comprehensive prenatal care and monitoring for the health of a woman and her baby,” adds developmental pediatrician Paul Wang, Autism Speaks head of medical research. Autism Speaks was not involved in the study, which was led by investigators at Kaiser Permanente and the University of California-Los Angeles Keck School of Medicine. What’s the difference between increasing risk versus causing autism? Read this insightful answer by pediatric neurologist and autism expert Martha Herbert. What we know about gestational diabetes Gestational diabetes develops in 6 to 7 percent of pregnancies, usually during the last trimester. It often produces no symptoms. So it can easily go unnoticed unless a woman is getting regular p Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Updated: It has been 3 years since Justin was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes. He will have it for the rest of his life… there is no cure. There’s nothing we could have done to prevent it, and it has nothing to do with his diet. The few weeks leading up to his diagnosis was really confusing and kind of scary. We just thought he was sick. After diaper rashes that kept coming back that I couldn’t get to go away on my own, (plus weight-loss), we took him to the ER one weekend. I got the medicine for the rash (pretty much the same thing I’d be using anyway). Then doctor casually mentioned that I should get his blood sugar checked the next time we take him to his pediatrician. He said that it wasn’t a rush or anything… that we didn’t want over-stimulate him (he has been one of the few ER doctors who understood Autism and was trying to be helpful). But whenever we could, to get it checked out when he started feeling better. Well by the time I got home, I was more worried about his blood sugar than about him being overwhelmed and took him the next day. They did a blood sugar check and it was so bad that the machine just said “High”. It didn’t even give us a number just “high”. The doctor said that considering, I caught it early… but it could have gotten so much worse had waited too much longer. We went straight from the Pediatrician to the Driscoll Children’s Hospital two hours away. We didn’t get a chance to pack or prepare… and their Dad had to stay home to take care of Tyler. So for three days it was just me and Justin. Thankfully he was able to stop back up once with some provisions, but not nearly as much as we needed. Being away from home… away from his safe space, his routine, not understanding what was going on, where he was, or why he Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism: Is There A Link?

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism: Is There A Link?

Response to Freeman et al. In a recent issue of Diabetes Care, Freeman et al. (1) discussed a possible link between type 1 diabetes and autism spectrum disorder (ASD). Their data suggested that the prevalence of ASD in nearly 1,000 children with type 1 diabetes may be greater than that in the general population. We investigated the presence of ASD in 5,178 children diagnosed with type 1 diabetes at age ≤14 years from the Prospective Childhood Diabetes Registry of Finland. Children with type 1 diabetes were born between 1980 and 2000. The data were linked to the nationwide Hospital Discharge Register (HDR) by the end of the year 2003 using the unique personal identity number that is assigned to all residents of Finland. We included autism, Asperger disorder, pervasive developmental disorder–not otherwise specified, Rett’s syndrome, and childhood disintegrative disorder in the diagnosis of ASD (2). We also linked the data of mothers of ASD cases to the HDR and reviewed hospital records in order to find out pregnancy and delivery complications related as potential risk factor for subsequent ASD in the child. Seven cases with type 1 diabetes fulfilled the criteria of ASD, giving a cumulative incidence of 1.35/1,000 (95% CI 0.5–2.8). The cumulative incidence of ASD did not differ from that in the background population. The cumulative incidence of ASD was 1.39/1,000 (1.2–1.57) at age 18 years in northern Finland (3). There was male excess in ASD; five of seven cases were boys. Perinatal risk factors were present in five cases of ASD; some of them had several: asphyxia during delivery was present in two cases, umbilical cord around the neck in three cases, and excess bleeding during delivery in two cases, of which one had asphyxia and one had umbilical cord around ne Continue reading >>

Type 2 - Metformin, Autism (aspergers) And Autism Related Digestive Problems - Any Contradictions With Meform | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Type 2 - Metformin, Autism (aspergers) And Autism Related Digestive Problems - Any Contradictions With Meform | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Type 2 Metformin, Autism (Aspergers) and Autism related digestive problems - any contradictions with Meform Hi all, I'm new here, and I'm new to Type 2 Diabetes. I am also Autistic - (higher functioning autism - Aspergers) which has amongst its characteristics problems with digestion. I am thus, since 15 years old (I am now 53) am Lactose Intolerant, IBS, (irritable bowel syndrome) since August 1980 - it comes and goes. My question for you all is if Metformin, especially in its slow release format, would have minimal side effects like diahorrea? (I would like to try to avoid that). I just want to get my 'energy' and 'stamina' back like it was some few years ago (pre 2014). Any ideas and or suggestions please? I would be most grateful. Thank you. Sincerely and with respect. Ramon Hartopp-Sancho (Ramon1965) I'll tag in @daisy1 for her intro about how a lot of us control our blood sugars. I had a very bad experience with Metformin so am probably not the best person to ask. I did find however that by changing what I ate I could get very good control of my blood sugar levels. Have a read through Daisy's post when she puts it up and come back with any questions you may have. The forum is a very helpful space with lots of experienced posters who are very welcoming and helpful. Hi all, I'm new here, and I'm new to Type 2 Diabetes. I am also Autistic - (higher functioning autism - Aspergers) which has amongst its characteristics problems with digestion. I am thus, since 15 years old (I am now 53) am Lactose Intolerant, IBS, (irritable bowel syndrome) since August 1980 - it comes and goes. My question for you all is if Metformin, especially in its slow release Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug May Help Symptoms Of Autism Associated Condition

Diabetes Drug May Help Symptoms Of Autism Associated Condition

Diabetes drug may help symptoms of autism associated condition Metformin 500mg tablets. Credit: public domain A widely used diabetes medication could help people with a common inherited form of autism, research shows. Scientists found that a drug called metformin improves sociability and reduces symptomatic behaviours in adult mice with a form of Fragile X syndrome. Researchers say that metformin could be repurposed as a therapy for Fragile X syndrome within a few years - if clinical trials prove successful. Fragile X syndrome is caused by inherited defects in a gene called FMR1, which leads to excess protein production in the brain. This results in the breakdown of connections between brain cells, leading to changes in behaviour. The team led by the University of Edinburgh and McGill University in Canada looked at the effects of metformin on mice that lack the FMR1 gene. These mice usually have symptoms consistent with Fragile X syndrome - they exhibit repetitive behaviours such as increased grooming and do not socialise with other mice. After mice had treatment with metformin for ten days, protein production in the brain returned to typical levels, brain connections were repaired and they displayed normal behaviour patterns, the researchers found. The therapy also reduced the occurrence of seizures, which are reported to affect between 10 and 20 per cent of people with Fragile X. Fragile X Syndrome affects around 1 in 4,000 boys and 1 in 6,000 girls. It is the most common known cause of inherited intellectual disability. Affected children have developmental delays that impair speech and language, problems with social interactions and are often co-diagnosed with autism, anxiety and seizures. Metformin is already approved by the UK's Medicines and Healthcare products R Continue reading >>

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Teens With Autism At Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Teens With Autism At Higher Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Those taking atypical antipsychotics also showed a higher risk of developing type 2 diabetes. HealthDay News Adolescents and young adults with autism spectrum disorder (ASD) are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), according to a study published online March 22 in Diabetes Care. Mu-Hong Chen, MD, from the Taipei Veterans General Hospital in Taiwan, and colleagues used the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database to identify 6122 adolescents and young adults with ASD and 24 488 age- and sex-matched control subjects (2002 to 2009). Patients were monitored until the end of 2011 to identify those who developed T2DM. The researchers found that adolescents (hazard ratio [HR], 2.71) and young adults (HR, 5.31) with ASD had a higher risk of developing T2DM versus those without ASD, after adjusting for demographic data, use of atypical antipsychotics, and medical comorbidities. There was also a higher likelihood of subsequent T2DM tied to short-term (HR, 1.97) and long-term (HR, 1.64) use of atypical antipsychotics. "Further research is necessary to investigate the common pathophysiology of ASD and T2DM," the authors wrote. Continue reading >>

Autism And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Autism And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Autism and Diabetes: What You Need to Know Autism and diabetes are two very different conditions. Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD) is a complex neurological disorder characterized by social impairments, repetitive behaviors, and struggles with verbal and nonverbal communication. Diabetes, on the other hand, is a disease in which the immune system either kills off insulin-producing cells (type 1) or the body becomes resistant to insulin (type 2). But could these two very different conditions be somehow connected? Research is beginning to indicate that the answer to that question is yes. And while there are certainly challenges that come from having both of them at the same time, there are ways in which autism can actually make certain aspects of diabetes management easier. Recent research ventures have found that individuals with autism have an increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The largest study to date that investigated this link took place in Taiwan and was published in 2016. Between the years 2002 and 2009, The researchers examined 30,610 people total , all of whom were ages 10 to 29. 6,122 of them had ASD and not diabetes, whereas the remaining 24,488 had neither condition and served as controls for the study. In 2011, researchers evaluated their data to see how many people had developed type 2 diabetes and whether there appeared to be an increased rate in one group or the other. It turned out that 1.6 percent of the autistic population developed type 2 diabetes, whereas the rate for the control group was a mere 0.4 percent. In other words, autistic people were at significantly higher risk of type 2 than neurotypical (non-autistic) people. So why the increased rates? There are likely several factors at play. While obesity is certainly not the only factor b Continue reading >>

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism. A Mothers Interview

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism. A Mothers Interview

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes and Autism. A Mothers Interview The following interview is with Ammey, a mother whose children have multiple medical and cognitive conditions. Of particular interest to me is her situation with her oldest son, Khy, who has both juvenile diabetes and autism. Ammey responded to my blog, Do You Have BOTH Juvenile Diabetes and Autism in Your Family? Here is her story. My name is Ammey, and Ive been married for thirteen years to my husband Mikel. We have three children: Our son Khy is 14, Kaine is 11, and Lilli is four. Khy has autism , asthma, type 1 diabetes , VUR, and chronic migraines. Our son Kaine has pervasive development disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD NOS) and narcolepsy. Lilli has asthma and whole body eczema. We laugh a lot in our house. Sometimes the literal interpretation of our boys comments creates very amusing jokes. The boys are phenomenal artists, and they draw all the time. Our home has a lot of pencils, paper, and erasers lying around. 2. Which diagnosis did your son receive first, and how old was he? What were the symptoms you observed? How did you handle the diagnosis? Khy was diagnosed with autism first, at the age of 8. He had very poor eye contact, repetitive behaviors like finger flicking, complex spinning , very narrow interests and echolalia . He was reading and drawing constantly by the age of 3. We were originally told he had Aspergers , and then they said it was autism. I felt speechless and frustrated. I missed the autism signs all those years, and so I blamed myself at first because he did not receive any early intervention . I dealt with my frustration by insisting he start whatever therapy he could at his age and worked hard with him on his deficits, focusing on his strengths. He became a regional center Continue reading >>

Type One Diabetes And Autism: Tiny Battles

Type One Diabetes And Autism: Tiny Battles

Trey was born a fighter. Diagnosed with a significant Ventricular Septal Defect (a big hole in his heart) shortly after birth, hospital visits and medical specialists have always been the norm for him. But he fought that tiny little broken heart out his first few years and against all odds managed to fight off the open heart surgery we were told he would eventually have to have. He won enough of those tiny battles to finally establish his position on the pediatric growth chart and when he was 4 years old, the hole had finally shrunk enough for the surgery to no longer be necessary. Then without enough time to even catch our breath, when he was still four, along came the next fight…autism. It was always there, but he was in preschool (2006) when a teacher first uttered the dreaded “A word” and I felt that familiar punch to the stomach that came with the diagnosis of the heart condition. Our lives significantly changed forever again with one simple sentence. “Mrs. Boyers, I think Trey might have autism.” And he did. We always knew something was “wrong,” but didn’t know how to fight it until we knew what it was. And then we fought. HE fought. Hard. He went from a child with no legitimate words at the age of 4 to a little boy mainstreamed by the end of the second grade. AND a teenager who skipped the 8th grade because he was accepted into a special autism high school at the local college! Trey has always shined the brightest light from those big dark brown eyes and taken on whatever the world has thrown at him, full speed ahead. It was no different when he was diagnosed with T1D at age 13 in 2015. As our “normal” world crashed down around us again with yet another quick one-sentence punch to the stomach, there he laid in his hospital bed hooked up to a m Continue reading >>

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism may share risk factors with diabetes Risky relationship: Certain genetic risk factors for autism are tied to weight problems, which can lead to diabetes. Teenagers and young adults with autism are about three times more likely than those without the condition to develop type 2 diabetes, according to one of the largest studies of autism and diabetes to date 1 . The findings, published in March in Diabetes Care, add to mounting evidence that people with autism face a long list of chronic health problems . Type 2 diabetes, which often goes hand-in-hand with obesity associated with a subset of autism cases can lead to heart disease and stroke, as well as nerve and kidney damage. We really need effective interventions for these adolescents and young adults to turn the tide and hopefully prevent the development of type 2 diabetes, says Meredith Dreyer Gillette , associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, who was not involved in the study. About 32 percent of young children with autism are overweight and 16 percent are obese, compared with 23 percent and 10 percent of typically developing children, respectively 2 . Certain genetic risk factors for autism, such as deletions on chromosome 16, are also tied to weight problems . Women who are obese or have diabetes while pregnant are more likely to have children with autism. The prevalence of diabetes among individuals with autism, however, has been less clear. A study last year found an increased risk of diabetes as well as many other chronic health problems among adults with autism, possibly stemming from a lack of access to preventive care 3 . To probe this link more deeply, a team of researchers in Taiwan identified 6,122 adolescents and young adults with autism and more than 24,000 co Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Type 1 Diabetes And Autism

Is there a link? The prevalence of diabetes in children and youth <18 years of age is ∼1 in 400–500 (1). The prevalence of diabetes for those aged <19 years from 1995–2000 in Ontario was 1.87 per 1,000 (2). Type 1 diabetes is recognized as a T-cell–mediated autoimmune process with a strong genetic contribution (3,4). In 2003, the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder was reported in one study as 3.4 per 1,000 children (5) and in another as 6.7 per 1,000 children (4 per 1,000 children with autism) aged 3–10 years (6) in the U.S. Like type 1 diabetes, both immune-mediated and genetic factors have been implicated in the development of autism (7,8). Based on recent clinical experiences and on the putative autoimmune etiology of these two conditions, we hypothesized that there would be an increased prevalence of autism spectrum disorder in a population of children with type 1 diabetes. To investigate this hypothesis, a retrospective chart review of nearly 1,000 children with type 1 diabetes followed at the Diabetes Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children was performed to identify children with autism spectrum disorder. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Children with both type 1 diabetes and autism spectrum disorder were identified (n = 9) by a retrospective chart review of all children with diabetes (n = 984 in 2002) attending the Diabetes Clinic at The Hospital for Sick Children. With respect to autism spectrum disorder, the data selected included age at diagnosis, method of diagnosis, and family history of autism spectrum disorder or learning disorders. For those identified, the diagnosis of autism spectrum disorder had been made previously by either a psychiatrist or developmental pediatrician. The 95% CI was calculated for the prevalence of autism spectrum disorder Continue reading >>

Diabetes Drug Counters Weight Gain Associated With Autism Medicines

Diabetes Drug Counters Weight Gain Associated With Autism Medicines

Study offers hope for children and teens who struggle with common a side effect of medications for reducing autism-associated agitation In a small new study, a commonly used diabetes drug curbed the troublesome weight gain that is a common side effect of the only two medicines approved for reducing agitation in children and teens with autism. The promising results of the study – which took place at four centers in the Autism Speaks Autism Treatment Network (ATN) – appear in the latest issue of JAMA Psychiatry. The research was made possible by the ATN’s federally funded role as the nation’s Autism Intervention Research Network for Physical Health. Risperidone (brand name Risperdal) and aripiprazole (Abilify) are the only medicines approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for reducing agitation and irritability in children with autism spectrum disorder (ASD). These medicines become important when serious agitation – including aggression – does not respond to non-drug, behavioral therapy. However, both risperidone and aripiprazole commonly produce significant weight gain – a worrisome side effect given obesity’s many associated health risks. Controlling a serious side effect of autism medications "It's critically important that we investigate new ways to support healthy outcomes as early as possible for those who are on these medications," says pediatric neurologist Evdokia Anagnostou, the study’s principal investigator and co-director of the Autism Speaks ATN at Toronto’s Holland Bloorview Kids Rehabilitation Hospital. "Use of antipsychotics to help manage irritability associated with ASD can sometimes be long-term, which means we need to provide families with solutions that support lasting optimal health in their children," she emphasizes. O Continue reading >>

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