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Atrial Fibrillation And Blood Sugar

Afib Affects Glucose Levels?

Afib Affects Glucose Levels?

I've noticed when I'm in Afib my sugar levels go up and I can't seem to get them down.... From 80 - 150 then they go as high as 250 in Afib and can't get it to stay below 180..... As soon as I go out of Afib my glucose numbers drop another 80 points..... I wear a continuos glucose monitor so I know every 5 minutes even while sleeping what my glucose reading are. I use Kardia by AliveCor to determine my cardiac condition. Anyone else go this cycle or have this reaction? That's an interesting observation Larry. Although I'm not diabetic ( or pre ) I do measure my blood sugar levels at home from time to time ( hypochondriac ? Moi ?! ) I shall take a measurement next time I go Into AF out of interest. I am diabetic and keep a close eye on my bg levels. I haven't tried taking it while in afib, but will do so next time. Very interesting point. What I have noticed is that when I get an infection, as I had a month ago, ( and it's kind of rumbled on ever since,) my bg goes high all the time. It's throwing my 'good' records all over the place! Interesting.... I never thought of that connection..... All I know is for some unknown reason I had BG under great control and for no apparent reason away higher and unable to control like I was the last few months...... The Afib is for sure not helping. Hi Larry, Glucose levels are affected by stress. When you are in AF your body is under stress, so I am not surprised that you are finding this. As an aside, I have a friend who is diabetic, and has AF, and has recently normalized her blood glucose by switching to a whole food plant based diet. Her physician is astounded and joyful that she was able to reverse her diabetes by taking animal products from her diet. Good luck to you. Yes I also see great results with better nutrition. 8 months Continue reading >>

Controlling Atrial Fibrillation Without Drugs

Controlling Atrial Fibrillation Without Drugs

OK, you knew you were light-headed from time to time, your thinking a bit slow and you were a bit fatigued. But you didn’t discover that the top chambers of your heart flutter periodically or constantly till your doctor discovered this problem during an examination. Some people with atrial fibrillation experience no symptoms. The moment this condition is detected patients are placed on a laundry list of medications as if this condition is caused by a drug deficiency. No effort is made to determine the cause of this condition or to prevent it. Its detection is an opportunity to prescribe problematic drugs. Your life and your health will be headed downhill if you follow your doctor’s directions from this point forward. You will be placed on drugs that induce serious and even life-threatening side effects, induce nutrient deficiencies and even worsen your condition. The medical literature points to elevated blood sugar levels as the primary cause of atrial fibrillation. Low carbohydrate diets (no bread, no pasta, no rice, no refined or fruit sugars) should be mandatory the moment atrial fibrillation is diagnosed. But doctors don’t see themselves as dieticians, they are drug prescribers and they are financially rewarded for prescribing drugs, not dietary supplements that may help control or even reverse this condition. The primary objective of conventional treatment for atrial fibrillation is to prescribe blood thinners to prevent blood clots that can cause strokes. These blood thinners (Warfarin-Coumadin, or the newer generation blood thinners (example: Pradaxa) all block an essential vitamin – vitamin K. The new generation blood thinners are not safer. They were developed and introduced to maintain profitability for pharmaceutical companies whose patents on prescr Continue reading >>

Glucose Fluctuations Increase The Incidence Of Atrial Fibrillation In Diabetic Rats.

Glucose Fluctuations Increase The Incidence Of Atrial Fibrillation In Diabetic Rats.

Glucose fluctuations increase the incidence of atrial fibrillation in diabetic rats. Department of Cardiology and Clinical Examination, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, 1-1 Idaigaoka, Hasama, Oita 879-5593, Japan. Department of Cardiology and Clinical Examination, Oita University, Faculty of Medicine, 1-1 Idaigaoka, Hasama, Oita 879-5593, Japan [email protected] Cardiovasc Res. 2014 Oct 1;104(1):5-14. doi: 10.1093/cvr/cvu176. Epub 2014 Jul 31. AIMS: We investigated whether glucose fluctuations aggravate cardiac fibrosis and increase the occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). METHODS AND RESULTS: Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into three groups: uncontrolled DM (U-STZ) group, controlled DM (C-STZ) group, and DM with glucose fluctuations (STZ-GF) group. Glucose fluctuations were induced by fasting for 24 h and additional regular insulin injections (0.5 IU/kg) administered three times per week for three consecutive weeks. C-STZ rats were administered long acting insulin (20 IU/kg) twice a day to control blood glucose levels. Cardiac fibrosis evaluated by Masson trichrome staining and the expressions of collagen type 1, collagen type 3, and -smooth muscle actin were increased in U-STZ rats compared with C-STZ rats, which were more pronounced in STZ-GF rats. The inducibility of AF was significantly larger in U-STZ rats than C-STZ rats and was greatest in STZ-GF rats. To explore the mechanism of cardiac fibrosis, we investigated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. The expression of malondialdehyde, an indicator of ROS levels, was significantly upregulated in STZ-GF rats compared with U-STZ rats, along with increased thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) expression in STZ-GF rat Continue reading >>

Three Tips To Prevent Or Reverse Atrial Fibrillation

Three Tips To Prevent Or Reverse Atrial Fibrillation

Three tips to prevent or reverse atrial fibrillation We are truly witnessing an epidemic in atrial fibrillation(A-fib). In fact, one in four adultsin the U.S. now will experience at least one episode of A-fib in their lifetime [1] . What is atrialfibrillation?A-fib is the mostcommon heart rhythm abnormality.Typically, the heart beat very rapid and chaotic which can lead to chestdiscomfort, shortness of breath, fatigue, and dizziness. Why should we worryabout atrial fibrillation?Thebiggest worry with A-fib is that it increases the risk of stroke five fold,doubles the risk of heart failure, doubles the risk of premature death, anddoubles the risk of dementia or Alzheimers Disease [2] ! The key to preventing these long-term complicationsis to maintain normal rhythm. What causes atrialfibrillation?Certainly geneticsplays a role but the big three causes of A-fib are age, high blood pressure,and obesity.Most cases of A-fib, justlike other forms of heart disease, are completely preventable.Indeed, studies have shown that 80% of heartdisease is totally preventable [3] .While we cant do anything about our age orgenetics, we can take control of our lifestyles and make sure our bloodpressure is under control and that we maintain an ideal body weight.As two-thirds of all Americans are nowoverweight is it any wonder why atrial fibrillation has become socommonplace.It should be noted thatsleep apnea is also a big cause of A-fib.However, for most patients, sleep apnea is just a consequence ofobesity.If we can lose the weight thesleep apnea will likely go away as well. What should we do ifwe have atrial fibrillation?Themost critical thing to do is to make sure we are protected against having astroke.Patients with A-fib and multiplerisk factors for stroke will need to be treated with a Continue reading >>

The Diabetes-atrial Fibrillation Link: Are You At Risk?

The Diabetes-atrial Fibrillation Link: Are You At Risk?

Afib, or atrial fibrillation as it's formally known, and diabetes are linked by common risk factors and are common diseases, so it's not surprising that many people have both conditions. What is surprising is that diabetes is an independent risk factor for this heart disease. That means just having diabetes alone can be a cause of afib. “Even in the world of cardiologists, it is not as well-known as it should be that diabetes is an independent risk factor for atrial fibrillation,” said Donna Denier, MD, councilor of the American College of Cardiology and a board certified cardiologist and internist at the South Nassau Communities Hospital Center for Cardiovascular Health in Baldwin, N.Y. Afib is the most common cause of irregular heart rhythm in the world. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and affects millions of Americans. Both diseases can shorten your life and increase your risk for a deadly stroke. High blood pressure, coronary heart disease, and obesity increase your risk for both diseases. A 2012 study published in the Journal of the American College of Cardiology reviewed the medical records of 34,720 female health professionals who took part in the Women’s Health Study. At the beginning of the study, 937 of the women had type 2 diabetes. Over a period of about 16 years, these women had almost double the risk of developing afib than other women in the study. “We know that age, obesity, high blood pressure, and sleep apnea are all risk factors for both diseases. But recent studies say the link goes deeper than that. Having diabetes increases your risk of afib by about 40 percent, and the incidence of afib goes up by about 3 percent for every year you have diabetes,” said Tu K. Le, MD, a board certified cardiologist at the Texas Health P Continue reading >>

Atrial Fibrillation Predicts Poor Outcome In Diabetes

Atrial Fibrillation Predicts Poor Outcome In Diabetes

Atrial Fibrillation Predicts Poor Outcome in Diabetes by Peggy Peck Peggy Peck, Executive Editor, MedPage Today Explain to interested patients that this analysis suggests that patients whose diabetes is complicated by atrial fibrillation may require more aggressive treatment to reduce cardiovascular risk factors. Note that this study confirms the value of blood pressure reduction in all patients with diabetes. SYDNEY, Australia, March 12 -- Diabetes and atrial fibrillation each significantly increase the risk of cardiovascular events, but combined, they increase the five-year risk of death by 61%, researchers said. And although reducing blood pressure cut the risk of heart attack, stroke, and death in all patients, the absolute benefit of antihypertensive treatment was greater among patients who had both diabetes and atrial fibrillation, investigators from the ADVANCE trial reported online in European Heart Journal. Treating 42 patients with diabetes and atrial fibrillation for five years with an ACE-inhibitor and a diuretic combination prevented one cardiovascular death, wrote Anuskha Patel, M.D., of the George Institute for Cardiovascular Health at the University of Sydney, and colleagues. The comparable needed-to-treat number for patients who have only diabetes was 120. Looking at all-cause mortality, treating 39 atrial fibrillation/diabetes patients for five years prevented one death but the needed-to-treat number for patients without atrial fibrillation was 84. These observations, they wrote, "are of direct relevance for routine clinical management of diabetic patients and indicate that detection of [atrial fibrillation] in a patient with diabetes should prompt more aggressive treatment of all cardiovascular risk factors." The findings emerged from a post-hoc anal Continue reading >>

Prevalence Of Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Atrial Fibrillation: A Case Control Study In 75-year Old Subjects

Prevalence Of Abnormal Glucose Metabolism In Atrial Fibrillation: A Case Control Study In 75-year Old Subjects

Prevalence of abnormal glucose metabolism in atrial fibrillation: A case control study in 75-year old subjects Johansen et al; licensee BioMed Central Ltd.2008 The prevalence of atrial fibrillation (AF) is increasing world wide and amongst factors that aggravate the risk is diabetes mellitus (DM), also in epidemic development. However, although DM is a potentially modifiable risk factor for AF, few, if any, studies have explored the prevalence of undiagnosed dysglycaemia among subjects with AF or if duration of AF are related to parameters of glycaemia or dysglycaemia prevalence. In this case control study, amongst 75-year old subjects with and without AF, the prevalence of dysglycaemia, i.e., impaired fasting glycaemia, impaired glucose tolerance or DM, according to World Health Organisation criteria was assessed by a 75-g oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). Prevalence of undiagnosed DM among the 108 subjects (male/female 73/35, BMI 25.4 3.2) without and the 46 (male/female 34/12, BMI 25.3 3.7) with AF (median AF duration five years) where 3.7% and 13.0%, respectively (p = 0.031, Odds ratio (OR) 3.86 (95% Confidence interval [CI]: 1.01, 16.25)) whereas the overall prevalence of dysglycaemia (prediabetes and DM) where similar (respectively 43.5% and 39.1%, p = 0.46, OR 0.83 [95% CI: 0.41, 1.69]). Patients with AF duration 5 years had however a higher dysglycaemia prevalence (61.1% [DM 22.2%, prediabetes 38.9%]) as compared to AF duration < 5 years (25% [DM 7.1%, prediabetes 17.9%], p = 0.0014, OR 4.7 [95% CI: 1.30, 16.90]) or no AF (p = 0.17, OR 2.04 [95% CI: 0.73, 5.66]). There was also a significant correlation between the duration of AF and HbA1c (r = 0.408, p = 0.005) and fasting glucose levels (r = 0.353, p = 0.016). AF is associated with chronic hyperglycaemia am Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar | Dailystrength

Low Blood Sugar | Dailystrength

Sat evening I felt like I was trying to black out after I went to bed. I take my y pills and eat low sugar diet. I did not think low B/P aas not feeling it. I got up and had a cookie and half cut milk. Was okay then. I think I was eating less bread. I am not diabectic. I eat breads and potatoes, crackers and that kind of foods. I read some on low blood sugar and says from pounding heart to passing out and and so on. My heart beat was a fine. I had been told with the pills to be sure to drink enough liquids. I try to do that every day. I went on the senior bus trip yesterday and was okay. Was okay Sun and Monday . I ate what they served at noon. I skipped chips and fruit. They did not serve any bread, Had potato salad. I ate the cookie and one small fun size candy bar. (I ca not eat fruit due acid,) I do not want to eat candy. Not suppose to eat cookies he said. But I do eat like one a day. Plain one. I did carry a couple pieces of candy and couple cookies on the trip just in case I am right on the sugar. I am trying to read up on how much suga a day a person needs. I have to limit how much I eat to keep wt where Dr wants it. Transient atrial fibrillation precipitated by hypoglycemia. SourceDepartment of Internal Medicine B, Bnai Zion Medical Center, Haifa, Israel. Two noninsulin-dependent diabetic patients developed transient atrial fibrillation precipitated by hypoglycemia that reverted to sinus rhythm after administration of IV dextrose. Atrial fibrillation as a complication of hypoglycemia in diabetic patients has been reported in only two patients with insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. BTW, I went through the hypoglycemia routine 20 years ago. Sugar makes your blood sugar spike and then crash. You need small amounts of protein during the day, not sugar. Protein Continue reading >>

The Atrial Fibrillation Diet: Foods To Avoid

The Atrial Fibrillation Diet: Foods To Avoid

Atrial fibrillation (AFib) occurs when the normal rhythmic pumping of the upper chambers of the heart, called the atria, break down. Instead of a normal heartbeat, the atria pulse, or fibrillate, at a fast or irregular rate. This can increase a persons risk of stroke and heart failure . Certain heart-healthy foods may allow you to maintain some control over your hearts rhythms. They include: fish and other foods with high amounts of omega-3 fatty acids fruits and vegetables high in vitamins, potassium, and beta carotene, such as dark leafy greens, broccoli, tomatoes, and asparagus oatmeal, especially with berries, nuts, and seeds added for extra protein and fiber Some foods are bad for your heart, and can make you more susceptible to symptoms of AFib . These include foods high in fat, sodium, and sugar. Eating too much of these foods can make events such as heart attacks more likely, too. Read on to learn what food and drinks to avoid. Studies show that alcohol can trigger an AFib episode if youve had a paroxysmal AFib attack. According to the Canadian Medical Association Journal (CMAJ) , even moderate drinking can lead to AFib episodes in people with heart disease or diabetes . Binge drinking is especially risky. If you have AFib, aim for no more than two drinks per day. For years, it was standard to recommend that people with AFib avoid caffeine. Some products that contain caffeine include: Clinical studies fail to show any link between caffeine intake and AFib episodes. According to a large Danish study , there was no association between coffee intake and AFib. Another study in dogs showed the risk of triggering an AFib episode was reduced in animals who were given caffeine. You may want to limit your intake of high-caffeine energy drinks, but a cup of coffee is pro Continue reading >>

Afib Diet: 15 Foods To Avoid With Atrial Fibrillation

Afib Diet: 15 Foods To Avoid With Atrial Fibrillation

A popular fruit-flavored brand has about 11 grams of sugar in one packet -- almost 3 teaspoons of added sugar. While most adults have about 22 teaspoons every day, women should get no more than 6 a day, and men no more than 9. All that extra sugar can lead to obesity and high blood pressure, which can set off bouts of AFib. More surprising sugar sources: pasta sauce, granola bars, and ketchup. Think cheddar, parmesan, and gorgonzola -- strong cheeses that have tyramine, an amino acid that helps raise blood pressure. Some scientists think eating foods with it may bring on symptoms for some people with heart disease. Tyramine is also in pepperoni and salami, sauerkraut and kimchee, and soybeans and snow peas. The science on caffeine as a trigger for AFib is somewhat mixed. Older research suggests a link, newer studies don't. But either way, you should go easy on your coffee. Too much caffeine could raise your blood pressure and heart rate, which might set off episodes of AFib. Stick to no more than two or three cups a day. Or switch to decaf. Or do both. Taking a blood thinner can help stop clots, which lead to a stroke, from forming. But warfarin (Coumadin, Jantoven) may not work as well when you eat foods high in vitamin K like lettuce, spinach, and kale. No need to keep these healthy veggies off your table, though. The trick is to eat the same amount of them every day. Then your doctor can adjust the dose of your medicine so it can still do its job. If you take medicine to control your heart rhythm, you may want to skip this citrus fruit. Grapefruits and grapefruit juice have chemicals that can change the way you digest amiodarone (Cordarone, Pacerone) and dofetilide (Tikosyn). That makes side effects from these drugs more likely. Talk to your doctor about whether gra Continue reading >>

Glucose Fluctuations Increase The Incidence Of Atrial Fibrillation In Diabetic Rats

Glucose Fluctuations Increase The Incidence Of Atrial Fibrillation In Diabetic Rats

We investigated whether glucose fluctuations aggravate cardiac fibrosis and increase the occurrence of atrial fibrillation (AF) in rats with diabetes mellitus (DM). Streptozotocin-induced diabetic rats were randomly divided into three groups: uncontrolled DM (U-STZ) group, controlled DM (C-STZ) group, and DM with glucose fluctuations (STZ-GF) group. Glucose fluctuations were induced by fasting for 24 h and additional regular insulin injections (0.5 IU/kg) administered three times per week for three consecutive weeks. C-STZ rats were administered long acting insulin (20 IU/kg) twice a day to control blood glucose levels. Cardiac fibrosis evaluated by Masson trichrome staining and the expressions of collagen type 1, collagen type 3, and -smooth muscle actin were increased in U-STZ rats compared with C-STZ rats, which were more pronounced in STZ-GF rats. The inducibility of AF was significantly larger in U-STZ rats than C-STZ rats and was greatest in STZ-GF rats. To explore the mechanism of cardiac fibrosis, we investigated the levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis. The expression of malondialdehyde, an indicator of ROS levels, was significantly upregulated in STZ-GF rats compared with U-STZ rats, along with increased thioredoxin-interacting protein (Txnip) expression in STZ-GF rats. Furthermore, caspase-3 expression and the number of TUNEL-positive cells were significantly increased in STZ-GF rats compared with U-STZ and C-STZ rats. Glucose fluctuations increase the incidence of AF by promoting cardiac fibrosis. Increased ROS levels caused by upregulation of Txnip expression may be a mechanism whereby in glucose fluctuations induce fibrosis. Diabetes mellitus , Glucose fluctuation , Atrial fibrillation Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a major risk factor for car Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Risk For Atrial Fibrillation And How Blood Sugars Matter

Type 1 Diabetes Risk For Atrial Fibrillation And How Blood Sugars Matter

Type 1 Diabetes Risk for Atrial Fibrillation and How Blood Sugars Matter In this study , the risk for atrial fibrillation in men with type 1 diabetes was found to be slightly higher whereas it was 50 percent higher in women and higher depending on blood sugar levels and kidney complications. Researchers noted in their study abstract that we know type 1 diabetes is linked to a higher risk for heart-related complications but, what about type 1 diabetes and atrial fibrillation? They conducted a prospective case-control study of individuals with type 1 diabetes found in the Swedish National Diabetes Registry who were all matched with five controls for age, sex, and county of residence found in the Swedish Population Register. The cases of atrial fibrillation were found in the Swedish National Patient Registry. Atrial fibrillation, or AFib, according to the Mayo Clinic is an irregular and often rapid heart rate that can increase your risk of stroke, heart failure and other heart-related complications. AFib can be occasional or persistent or even permanent and lead to further heart complications. Symptoms of atrial fibrillation include palpitations (sensations of racing, discomfort, or irregular heartbeat or a flip-flopping in your chest), weakness, reduced ability to exercise, fatigue, lightheadedness, dizziness, confusion, shortness of breath, and chest pain. Learn more at the Mayo Clinic . AFibMatters.org states that Elevated blood pressure is a strong predictor of the development of atrial fibrillation. Type 1 Diabetes and Elevated Risk for Atrial Fibrillation The researchers looked at 36,258 patients with type 1 diabetes and 179,980 controls between Jan 1, 2011 and Dec 31, 2018. The medium follow-up was 9.7 years for patients and 10.2 years for controls. There were 749 Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Cause Atrial Fibrillation? | Atrial Fibrillation - Sharecare

Can Diabetes Cause Atrial Fibrillation? | Atrial Fibrillation - Sharecare

A common complication of diabetes is heart disease, and heart disease can lead to developing atrial fibrillation. If your diabetes is poorly controlled (your blood sugar levels are higher than they should be) you are at a higher risk of developing atrial fibrillation. Controlling your diabetes is the key to preventing other complications, including atrial fibrillation. Atrial fibrillation -- the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia -- causes an irregular heartbeat that can increase your risk for stroke and heart failure. Atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib) results from faulty signals produced by ... the heart's electrical system, causing the upper portion of the heart to fibrillate, or contract rapidly and irregularly. AFib doesn't cause noticeable symptoms for everyone. For those who do experience symptoms, heart palpitations are common along with feeling weak, dizzy and tired. Learn more about atrial fibrillation with expert advice from Sharecare. Living With Atrial Fibrillation & Prevention Atrial Fibrillation Symptoms Important: This content reflects information from various individuals and organizations and may offer alternative or opposing points of view. It should not be used for medical advice, diagnosis or treatment. As always, you should consult with your healthcare provider about your specific health needs. Atrial fibrillation -- the most common type of cardiac arrhythmia -- causes an irregular heartbeat that can increase your risk for stroke and heart failure. Atrial fibrillation (AF or AFib) results from faulty signals produced by the heart's electrical system, causing the upper portion of the heart to fibrillate, or contract rapidly and irregularly. AFib doesn't cause noticeable symptoms for everyone. For those who do experience symptoms, heart palpitation Continue reading >>

Metabolic Syndrome And Atrial Fibrillation

Metabolic Syndrome And Atrial Fibrillation

Metabolic Syndrome and Atrial Fibrillation The metabolic syndrome is characterized by a group of metabolic risk factors in one person. These include abdominal obesity, dyslipidemia (blood fat disorders like high triglycerides, low HDL cholesterol and high LDL cholesterol), elevated blood pressure, abnormal blood sugar metabolism (insulin resistance or glucose intolerance), a prothrombotic state (abnormal blood clotting mechanisms), as well as a proinflammatory state. The American Heart Association and the National Heart, Lung and Blood Institute recommend that the diagnostic criteria for metabolic syndrome include the presence of three or more of these components: Elevated waist circumference: Men Equal to or greater than 40 inches (102 cm) ; Women Equal to or greater than 35 Elevated triglycerides: Equal to or greater than 150 mg/dL Reduced HDL (good) cholesterol: Men Less than 40 mg/dL Women Less than 50 mg/dL Elevated blood pressure: Equal to or greater than 130/85 mm Hg Elevated fasting glucose: Equal to or greater than 100 mg/dL For quite some time, we have known that the various components of metabolic syndrome are risk factors for atrial fibrillation. A new study called the REGARDS study was published in the American Journal of Cardiology and showed that metabolic syndrome increases the risk of atrial fibrillation by as much as 20%. This report follows a report from Reuters Health in May that diabetes increases the risk of atrial fibrillation by 30-40%. REGARDS evaluated the associations among 23,650 study participants, including 9,421 (39.8%) with metabolic syndrome. On multivariate analysis, each metabolic syndrome component except high triglycerides was significantly associated with an increased risk of atrial fibrillation, and the risk for atrial fibrillatio Continue reading >>

Atrial Fibrillation Can Cause Major Hyperglycemia - Em|consulte

Atrial Fibrillation Can Cause Major Hyperglycemia - Em|consulte

Atrial fibrillation can cause major hyperglycemia V. Rigalleau[1], L. Baillet[1], M. Hocini[2], H. Gin[1] [1]Nutrition-Diabtologie, Hpital Haut-Lvque, 33600 Pessac, France. [2]Cardiologie, Hpital Haut-Lvque, 33600 Pessac, France. [1]Nutrition-Diabtologie, USN, Hpital Haut-Lvque, Avenue de Magellan, 33600 Pessac, France. e-mail: We report the case of a 66 years old woman with a well controlled, insulin-treated, type 2 diabetes, who experienced a ten-fold increase of her daily insulin needs (from 21 to 215 U/day) after the onset of a symptomatic atrial fibrillation. Check-up for another cause of insulin resistance was negative, and insulin doses could be decreased to preceeding values only after electric cardioversion. Symptomatic atrial fibrillation should be considered as a potential cause of hyperglycemia. Fibrillation auriculaire: cause possible d'une hyperglycmie majeure. Nous rapportons le cas d'une femme de 66 ans, diabtique de type 2, bien quilibre sous insuline, dont les besoins insuliniques quotidiens ont dcupl (de 21 215 U/j) aprs la survenue d'une fibrillation auriculaire symptmatique. La recherche d'une autre cause d'insulino-rsistance a t ngative, et les doses d'insuline n'ont pu tre ramenes aux valeurs initiales qu'aprs rduction par choc lectrique. Une fibrillation auriculaire symptmatique peut entrainer une hyperglycmie majeure. Mots cls : fibrillation auriculaire , diabte de type 2 , hyperglycmie Keywords: atrial fibrillation , type 2 diabetes , hyperglycemia Atrial fibrillation (AF) affects about 3% of subjects over 65 years of age [ 1 Furberg CD, Psaty BM, Manolio TA et al. Prevalence of atrial fibrillation in elderly subjects (the Cardiovascular Health Study). Am J Cardiol , 1994, 74,236-241. Click here to see the Library ]. Diabetic subjects are twic Continue reading >>

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