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Atkins Diet Gestational Diabetes

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

Can Low Carb Help With Gestational Diabetes In Pregnancy?

When Natalie Thompson Cooper was diagnosed with gestational diabetes in her first pregnancy, at age 28, she was very concerned. The condition, which affects at least one in seven pregnancies to as many as one in five, causes blood sugars to rise abnormally high, called hyperglycemia. 1 Natalie knew hyperglycemia bathed her unborn daughter in glucose, putting the fetus at risk for a wide range of potential complications, including miscarriage, birth defects, macrosomia (very large size), high blood pressure, birth trauma, and higher rates of C-section and even stillbirth. 2 Moreover, gestational diabetes (GD) — also called ‘carbohydrate intolerance of pregnancy’ — greatly increases the risk that the mother and her offspring will both face future health problems, such as much higher rates of eventual type 2 diabetes, metabolic conditions, and cardiovascular disease. 3 GD is one of the most common and significant complications of pregnancy. Prenatal guidelines the world over recommend the routine screening of all pregnant women and then, if positive, strict management, starting with dietary therapy, then if that does not work, insulin injections. 4 However, to this day, what constitutes the best “dietary therapy” is hotly debated, with some researchers proposing a diet high in complex carbohydrates (60% carbs) and others lower carbohydrates (40% carbs). 5 However, the recommended “lower carb” GD diet is still far higher than the under 20 g per day of the strict low-carb high-fat or ketogenic diet. In fact, many guidelines for GD recommend women, on an ostensibly “lower-carb” diet, eat a minimum 175 g of carbohydrate daily, a level at which many women see their blood sugar rise out of control. “Honestly, 175 g of carbohydrate is stupid! Women should be Continue reading >>

Atkin's - Gestational Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Atkin's - Gestational Diabetes - Diabetes Forums

Registration is fast, simple and absolutely free so please,join our community todayto contribute and support the site. This topic is now archived and is closed to further replies. I LOVE the ATkin's bars but I am confused as to going by the total carbs or the net carbs? I had been eating them along with lunch but then I got nervous that I was eating too many carbs, but my husband insists that I can have them over and beyond my allotted 3 carbs with meals and it would not affect my bs. I'd advise eating it and then checking your blood sugar to see if you can tolerate it along with your meal...if so, enjoy! Even 3 carbs will affect my BS... I've always been confused by those Atkins bars too... They say they have 22 Total carbs and 10 Grams of fiber.. in my mind that's 12 Net carbs, though on the package front it claims 2 Net carbs.. I can't understand how they arrive at that figure... hmm... Even 3 carbs will affect my BS... I've always been confused by those Atkins bars too... They say they have 22 Total carbs and 10 Grams of fiber.. in my mind that's 12 Net carbs, though on the package front it claims 2 Net carbs.. I can't understand how they arrive at that figure... hmm... Supposedly they subtract the alcohol sugar and fiber out of it it because the body doesn't digest that. I was just wondering if this was really true. It depends. Sugar alcohols other than erythritol do not work for me. HUGE spike. Maltitol has side effects that are very unpleasant. Personally, I would steer clear of these types of processed foods on a regular basis. Princesslinda is correct that you should eat and test. Some highly processed foods like this one can cause spikes. Supposedly they subtract the alcohol sugar and fiber out of it it because the body doesn't digest that. I was just wonderi Continue reading >>

What Do We Know About Diet And Gestational Diabetes?

What Do We Know About Diet And Gestational Diabetes?

Why do some women develop diabetes during pregnancy? And if gestational diabetes is “just” a disease of pregnancy and goes away after birth, why do so many of those women go on to get Type 2 diabetes later in life? As it turns out, diabetes of pregnancy might be a red flag for pre-existing, long-term metabolic problems. It’s not an issue that suddenly appears out of the blue during pregnancy for no reason. And it’s one more reason for everyone to take care of their diet, even if they’re healthy right now. Gestational diabetes can affect the health of the woman long after her pregnancy is over, and it also affects the health of the baby (this is where men come in – if your mother had gestational diabetes, you’ll probably want to know about it). Here’s a look at where it comes from, and why a long-term game plan is so important. What Is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is a type of diabetes triggered by pregnancy. Women with gestational diabetes didn’t have diabetes before they were pregnant (in that case it would just be regular old type 1 or type 2 diabetes). Typically, gestational diabetes also goes away after birth…at least temporarily. Like all other kinds of diabetes, gestational diabetes has been getting more and more common: the rate of gestational diabetes increased 122% between 1989 and 2004. Gestational diabetes is more common in older mothers, nonwhite women, women with a family history of diabetes, and women who were overweight before their pregnancy (although it also shows up in thin women, so just being thin is no guarantee of safety). If a woman has gestational diabetes during one pregnancy, she’s more likely to have it in future pregnancies. Women with gestational diabetes usually don’t get any symptoms, but they can some Continue reading >>

Get To Know Diabetes: How Atkins Can Help

Get To Know Diabetes: How Atkins Can Help

November is National Diabetes Month, a time to shine a spotlight on diabetes prevention and control. This challenging disease affects millions of people, but it can be prevented and controlled through important lifestyle changes. Here’s what you need to know: While there are actually three types of diabetes (see below), when we talk about diabetes in the context of Atkins, we are typically referring to Type 2 diabetes or pre-diabetes. The Three Types of Diabetes Type 1 diabetes: This happens when your pancreas can’t make insulin, leading to high blood sugar. If you have Type 1 diabetes, you have to take insulin to help control your blood sugar. Type 1 diabetes is most often diagnosed in childhood. Type 2 diabetes: This happens when your pancreas doesn’t make enough insulin, or your body can’t process insulin effectively. Being overweight heightens your risk of this type of diabetes, and it can happen to a person of any age. Gestational diabetes: This occurs during pregnancy in some women when hormone changes prevent insulin from working properly. You may need to take insulin, but the condition may resolve after childbirth. And the diabetes statistics are staggering: Nearly 26 million children and adults in the United States have diabetes. Another 79 million Americans have pre-diabetes and are at risk for developing Type 2 diabetes. The American Diabetes Association estimates that the total national cost of diagnosed diabetes in the United States is $174 billion. Both prevention and treatment of pre-diabetes and Type 2 diabetes requires proper nutrition and exercise. Fortunately, a low-carb diet like Atkins can be helpful in stabilizing blood sugar and insulin production, leading to weight loss and reducing other cardiovascular risk factors associated with the di Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet For Pregnancy

Atkins Diet For Pregnancy

You are here: Gestational Diabetes Gestational Diabetes Diet Atkins Diet for Pregnancy Posted by Admin on September 9th, 2017 08:14 AM Atkins diet is one of the most preferred diet options for guys as well as women yet a couple of females likewise go with this diet regimen when they are pregnant. Atkins diet plan is based on the concept that carbohydrates are to be utilized prior to fats for acquiring energy. What Atkins diet proposes is that by taking in lower amounts of carbohydrates, one burns fat first as well as this is done to promote weight loss. According to some experts, Atkins diet plan is a limiting diet regimen which is not really healthy for an expecting woman and her baby. The following is some more details on Atkinss diet plan for maternity: It is not the best thing for an expecting woman to take place any kind of kind of a restrictive diet regimen. When a lady is pregnant, diet programs can impact her weight as well as the weight of the child. Going on Atkins diet can protect against the infant and the mother from getting all the important nutrients as well as is consequently not suggested. By complying with Atkins diet, one removed the carbohydrate supply as well as rejects herself from those vitamins and minerals which are crucial for the babys growth. Infact in contrast to common belief, when carbohydrate diet plan and fat diet is contrasted in terms of caloric web content, then carbohydrates are found to consist of minimal calories than fats. It is said that the base of each dish have to be a starchy food thing and also for that reason having carbs during maternity is extremely important. In what Scenarios can an Expecting Woman adhere to Atkins Diet? In some cases or under some problems, ladies can adhere to Atkins diet regimen while pregnant. The Continue reading >>

Atkins Diet And Diabetes

Atkins Diet And Diabetes

The Atkins diet and diabetes are closely linked, due to low-carb dieting being widely viewed as an effective way to control diabetes. Dr Robert Atkins is synonymous with the link between carbohydrates and sugar, and is widely hailed as a guru in the control of type 2 diabetes . Dr Atkins was key in making the connection between obesity and insulin more widely spread. At this point, diabetes was often treated with a diet high in starchy carbs and sugar. Atkins played an important role in understanding how restricting carbohydrates could result in more stable blood sugar and is an essential part of managing type 2 diabetes. The Atkins has a number of phases which are intended to be followed in a particular order. The diet starts at a low daily carbohydrate intake of 20 grams per day. This is the induction phase of the diet. The following phases, involve gradually introducing foods with higher carbohydrate levels, as long as these are not hindering your progress to your target weight . The end phase of the diet, lifetime maintenance, is intended to be kept over the long term to maintain the successes achieved in the earlier phases of the diet. The media has a tendency to caricature the diet as being one that includes next to no carbohydrate and begins and ends with fried breakfasts . This would only describe the induction stage of the diet and certainly more dietary choice is available within this first phase. Whilst the Atkins diet has been a very popular diet, the Atkins diet when used as a long-term approach is controversial in some circles. Critics of the Atkins diet claim that the levels of animal protein and fat recommended within the diet are excessive. Critics claim that this diet could cause damage to the kidneys and liver as a result of ketones. Prolonged period Continue reading >>

The Best Diet For Diabetes

The Best Diet For Diabetes

World Diabetes Day, the world’s largest diabetes awareness campaign, is focused this year on Women and Diabetes. According to the International Diabetes Federation, 199 million women have type-2 diabetes, and that is projected to increase to 313 million by 2040. In fact, diabetes is a leading cause of death among women. And that’s a scary fact. Diabetes has always been a hot topic for me, because it’s a worldwide epidemic that affects everyone, not just women: It’s estimated that 552 million people could have type-2 diabetes in the next two decades. Currently, half of the U.S. population is diabetic or pre-diabetic. It’s more important now, more than ever, to get the word out on what causes type-2 diabetes, and what you can do to prevent and control it. What Causes Type-2 Diabetes? There are two main types of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. In addition, there is gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy in some women when hormone changes prevent insulin from working properly, but the condition usually resolves after childbirth. Meanwhile, both types 1 and 2 are chronic diseases that affect how your body regulates blood sugar, or glucose, which is the fuel that feeds your body’s cells. Insulin is needed to make this happens. People with type-1 diabetes can’t produce insulin at all, People with type-2 diabetes can’t control their insulin levels and eventually may not produce insulin at all. This starts with insulin resistance, and it may happen gradually over time. While type-1 diabetes can’t be prevented or reversed, type-2 diabetes can. The Best Diet for Preventing and Controlling Type-2 Diabetes There continues to be a compelling research-backed argument that shows that cutting back on carbs has the greatest effect on regulating blood sugar lev Continue reading >>

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

9 Gestational Diabetes Myths

As a specialist in gestational diabetes nutrition, I get a lot of questions about blood sugar and pregnancy. Gestational diabetes is controversial. It’s complicated. And there’s a lot of misinformation out there. I do my best to address the controversies in interviews and with participants in my online gestational diabetes course, but since I’ve been receiving more and more inquiries in my inbox from fellow healthcare professionals, I wanted to dispel some gestational diabetes myths head-on right here on the blog. I’ll also be attending some midwifery conferences this year (including one this weekend), and I figured this resource would be a helpful place to refer practitioners if they have questions. Given the medical interventions that are commonly pushed on women with gestational diabetes (believe me, I’m also disheartened by the over-medicalization of pregnancy and birth), it’s important to understand the science behind high blood sugar and pregnancy. My goal is to help moms and practitioners make better decisions – based on fact, not fear – so they can have the healthiest pregnancy possible. 9 Gestational Diabetes Myths Myth #1: Blood Sugar Levels are Naturally Higher In Pregnancy There’s a lot of misinformation floating around about blood sugar levels in pregnancy. Some think that gestational diabetes is a “diagnosis looking for a disease.” In other words, they believe that blood sugar levels naturally go up during pregnancy, so there’s nothing to worry about. Some practitioners don’t even test for gestational diabetes and just tell their patients to “eat healthy” under the assumption that any rise in blood sugar is just a normal phenomenon of pregnancy. Unfortunately, that’s not true. Research has looked at blood sugar levels in nor Continue reading >>

A Tale Of Low Carb Diets And Gestational Diabetes

A Tale Of Low Carb Diets And Gestational Diabetes

With the rising popularity of low carb/paleo type diets has come a curious unintended consequence: expecting mothers receiving a false positive on their Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) test. Gestational Diabetes Mellitus (GDM) GDM is diabetes (“Type 4 Diabetes”) diagnosed in the second or third trimester of pregnancy that is not obviously type 1 or 2 [1]. Women with diabetes in the first trimester would be classified as having type 2 diabetes [1]. The essential contributing factor to GDM is pancreatic insufficiency [2]. Basically, your pancreas is not making enough insulin for your body to overcome the increased insulin resistance due to the placental hormones of pregnancy and increased maternal adipose tissue, which could potentially cause your blood glucose levels to remain high. GDM = weak pancreas. Not making enough insulin for you and the baby. Testing There are two test for GDM: the one step and two step strategy. The One-Step test is the first test for diagnosing GDM. The diagnosis of GDM is made when any of the following plasma glucose values are met or exceeded [3]: Fasting: 92 mg/dL (5.1 mmol/L) 1 hour into the test: 180 mg/dL (10.0 mmol/L) 2 hours into the test: 153 mg/dL (8.5 mmol/L) If for whatever reason you do not pass the One-Step Oral Glucose Tolerance Test (OGTT), ask for the Two-Step test or ask them to check your HbA1C, as it shows blood sugar levels over time as opposed to the brief snapshot these one and two step tests provide. HbA1C can be measured with a simple blood test. The Two-Step test involves the following [3]: Step 1: Perform a 50-g Glucose Loading Test (GLT) (non-fasting), with plasma glucose measurement at 1 h. If the plasma glucose level measured 1 h after the load is ≥140 mg/dL (7.8 mmol/L), proceed to a 100-g OGTT. Step 2: Continue reading >>

Atkins Shakes - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Atkins Shakes - Gestational Diabetes | Forums | What To Expect

Since I had GD last pregnancy, my OB told me at 9 weeks to start eating the GD diet. I am not testing my sugar right now, as I won’t take the glucose tests till later in my pregnancy. My question is- do any of you drink Atkins shakes and do okay with them? They are so easy and taste great to me. Today is Day 1 of GD diet. I guess technically this is how I should eat all the time, not just in pregnancy :) Also- he said following this diet early on may help me pass my glucose test. Any thoughts on that?? I had Atkins last pregnancy with my bedtime snack. They helped my numbers for a while until hormones took over. Following the diet could help your body better react to sugar and help your insulin kick in so it could help if you are borderline, but it is always hard to say what the placenta will do I have them when I’m super hungry but can’t get to breakfast (usually chug one in the car while taking my kiddo to school until I can make real food). My numbers are great with them. I’ve only tried chocolate and French vanilla. My doctor said they’re a good sub for a quick, occasional snack. I’ve also recently found the frozen Atkins meals. The egg dish is good. Even had it with a whole wheat eggo waffle and real syrup (all we had) and my numbers were still spot on. I got the pizza to try this week but haven’t had a reason to make it yet. It has the highest carbs of the ones I’ve tried - I’m curious to see if my body can handle it! I have them all the time. Mostly as my bedtime snack but sometimes as my breakfast. They are great for my numbers. Continue reading >>

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Real Food For Gestational Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Note From Mommypotamus: When I wrote about natural alternatives to the glucola test, many of you asked what to do if gestational diabetes is diagnosed and confirmed. Today I am so excited to welcome Lily Nichols, RDN, CDE, CLT, a registered nutritionist and gestational diabetes educator, who will be filling us in on how to take a real food approach to GD. Lily is the author of Real Food for Gestational Diabetes, a thoroughly researched guide filled with practical guidance and easy-to-follow instructions. It is, hands down, the best resource on the subject that I have found so far. If you or someone you know is looking for information on managing GD with real food, I highly recommend it! Gestational diabetes is never part of any mom’s plan . . . But it is the most common complication of pregnancy, affecting up to 18% of pregnant women. Yet there are many misconceptions about this diagnosis, both in conventional health care and the integrative medicine world. As a registered dietician/nutritionist and certified diabetes educator who specializes in gestational diabetes, I’m going to clear up some of the confusion for you today. Whether or not you have gestational diabetes, this post will help you understand how it develops and why it’s important to maintain normal blood sugar (for all pregnant women, really). I’ll also be sharing why the typical gestational diabetes diet fails and why a real food, nutrient-dense, lower carbohydrate approach is ideal for managing gestational diabetes. What is Gestational Diabetes? Gestational diabetes is usually defined as diabetes that develops or is first diagnosed during pregnancy. However, it can also be defined as “insulin resistance” or “carbohydrate intolerance” during pregnancy. I prefer to rely on the latter descrip Continue reading >>

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help In Gestational Diabetes

Low Carb Diet Won't Help in Gestational Diabetes by Todd Neale Todd Neale, Senior Staff Writer, MedPage Today This article is a collaboration between MedPage Today® and: Note that this small randomized study demonstrated that a low carbohydrate diet was not superior to a control diet in reducing insulin use among women with gestational diabetes. Be aware that pregnancy outcomes were similar in both groups as well. Simply reducing dietary carbohydrate content was not an effective way to forestall the need for insulin among women with gestational diabetes, a randomized trial showed. The percentage of patients who were started on insulin was 54.7% both among those who ate a low-carbohydrate diet and among those who ate a diet with a normal level of carbohydrates (P=1.00), according to Didac Mauricio, MD, PhD, of the University of Lleida in Spain, and colleagues. Pregnancy and neonatal outcomes were similar in the two groups as well, the researchers reported online in Diabetes Care. "Therefore, the amount of carbohydrates [in] the diet may not be a key issue in future clinical recommendations on medical nutrition therapy of gestational diabetes," they wrote. "Additional randomized intervention studies that consider different populations and different strategies to modify glycemic load are warranted to assess the optimal [approach]," they wrote. Medical nutrition therapy has formed the basis of treatment for gestational diabetes, and has been centered on modifying the amount and distribution of carbohydrates to maintain glycemic control without ketosis, according to the researchers. In recent years, the therapy has been aimed primarily at modifying the glycemic index, but there is little evidence-based information on specific approaches to managing the condition. The curre Continue reading >>

Pregnant And Diabetic

Pregnant And Diabetic

Print Font: Oct. 30 — Jill Miller, a Los Angeles mother-to-be, is nervously awaiting the results of a test her obstetrician gave her to check her blood sugar levels in her 26th week of pregnancy. As an expectant first-time mother over 35, the public relations executive knows she has an increased risk of developing gestational diabetes and has already tried to get her sweet tooth under control in order to keep her pregnancy weight down. More women opting for preventive mastectomy - but should they be? Rates of women who are opting for preventive mastectomies, such as Angeline Jolie, have increased by an estimated 50 percent in recent years, experts say. But many doctors are puzzled because the operation doesn't carry a 100 percent guarantee, it's major surgery -- and women have other options, from a once-a-day pill to careful monitoring. “I have been trying to curb my sugar intake by avoiding our candy-filled snack closet at the office, but am finding it difficult to give up my nearly nightly dose of ice cream,” she says. Miller is relieved when her glucose test comes back normal. But the experience has made her feel “more sensitive about what I’m eating now than I did before I was pregnant.” Gestational diabetes affects about 4 percent of all pregnant women in the United States each year, according to the American Diabetes Association. But across the country, health care providers and dietitians specializing in diabetic care are reporting a rise in the number of women being diagnosed with the condition. Some of the increased incidence comes from women like Miller who are delaying child-bearing until their 30s or 40s — considered old age in maternity years. While women over 30 are more likely to develop glucose intolerance during pregnancy because of their Continue reading >>

Gestational Diabetes Made Me A Better Mom

Gestational Diabetes Made Me A Better Mom

Diabetes gets a bad rap and deserves it, but gestational diabetes actually changed me for the better. I had this diagnosis with all three of my children. It was a hard pill to swallow during my first pregnancy, but one I readily accepted with my next two because gestational diabetes taught me a lot about myself, my health, and the kind of mom I wanted to be for my kiddos. I wasnt all that worried when I flunked the one-hour glucose test during my first pregnancy. I had eaten a large bowl of ice cream the night before after polishing off some Mexican food with my in-laws. I fasted correctly for my three-hour test, but hung a lot of my hopes on the claim that the majority of women fail the one-hour test and do fine on the three-hour test. When the nurse called me at home, I cried because it just did not seem fair. Self-pity took over for the rest of the day. I had already had two miscarriages prior to this pregnancy, which made me feel like I was owed a perfect nine months of getting fat and feeling comfortable baby kicks. I wanted to eat pancakes for a mid-afternoon snack and have milk shakes at every meal. After a sleepless night, I did some on-line research. It was comforting to hear that a lot of women are diagnosed with gestational diabetes. And like most things, women can handle it. I visited a diabetic counselor the next week, and we worked on a food plan. She explained that patients rarely need insulin if they follow the diabetic guidelines about portion control and making good food choices. It seemed pretty straightforward and, lucky for me, I had my husband on hand to listen to the medical advice. I got a monitor, testing strips, and some pen needles to check my blood sugar four times a day. That evening, I had my first diabetic friendly meal, and it was bacon Continue reading >>

Ok, I'm Pregnant But Have Gestational Diabetes So I'm Unintentionally On Aspecialised Diet But It's Not Really Working. Tbc Below. Thanks

Ok, I'm Pregnant But Have Gestational Diabetes So I'm Unintentionally On Aspecialised Diet But It's Not Really Working. Tbc Below. Thanks

Ok, I'm pregnant but have gestational diabetes so I'm unintentionally on aspecialised diet but it's not really working. Tbc below. Thanks Therefore, I'm trying to add some light exercise but I need some ideas. Please help. Walking already being done. I'm trying not to need insulin. You need to speak to a health professional. Healthy eating is advised, especially when pregnant. For pre-diabetes, novo nordisk recommend keeping your carbohydrate between 10 and 14 portions per day (but again check with a health professional; the aim is to keep your blood glucose within a very tight range, it's as vital you don't go too low as not to go too high. Some exercise is good to maintain heart and lung function for instance, but it doesn't matter how active you are if you continue to take in more carbohydrate than you use, you won't lower your blood glucose. Eat low GI carbohydrates glycemicindex.com/ I couldn't eat that much carbohydrate in the slightest. I'm eating about 5 a day and that can send me over. I match a mouthful of protein with a mouthful of medium to low gi carbs. I'm a bit stuck really. Protein every meal probably about 200g a day at least. That's the biggest portion of food that I eat behind veg. Fat - it slows down the sugar so quite a lot, more than I usually would have say 100g a day. Lots of salad, nuts. 2 pieces of brown bread in the morning with peanut butter and then what ever I can get away with. I had toast and peanut butter all week and it was fine - today I had the same thing and it was over. The eat well plate has gone out of the window as it contains too many carbs. Peas or beans are a no-no. Sandwiches etc no. Nothing sweet or simple carbs even cough sweets are sugar free (had a cold). I hope that helps as it's difficult to pin down and I'm not trying Continue reading >>

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