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Athlete With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

List Of Sportspeople With Diabetes

Improvements in the management of diabetes mellitus in the twentieth century have made it possible for athletes to compete in sport at a professional level. While it is rare for professional athletes to have type 2 diabetes, a number of notable athletes have type 1. Literature on the management of diabetes in competitive sports focuses on the difficulties with balancing energy and insulin intake during periods of strenuous exercise.[1] The following is a list of notable sportspeople who have had diabetes during their careers. It does not include athletes diagnosed after retirement. Water-Polo Keegan Coleman, Pomona-Pitzer Sagehens (2017-current) driver/attacker, type 1 American football[edit] Jay Cutler, Denver Broncos (2006–2008) and Chicago Bears (2009–2016) quarterback, type 1.[2] Mike Echols, Tennessee Titans (2002–2004) cornerback, type 1.[3] Kendall Simmons, Pittsburgh Steelers (2002–2008) guard, type 1.[4] Jake Byrne, San Diego Chargers, tight end, type 1[5] John Chick, Saskatchewan Roughriders (2007–2009, 2013–), Indianapolis Colts (2010–11), Jacksonville Jaguars (2011–2012) defensive end, type 1[6] Patrick Peterson, Arizona Cardinals (2011–); cornerback, type 2 Mark Andrews, Oklahoma Sooners, tight end, type 1[7] Australian rules football[edit] Nathan Bassett, Adelaide, type 1.[8] Jamie Cripps, St Kilda and West Coast, type 1.[9] Jack Fitzpatrick, Melbourne, Hawthorn type 1.[10] Brandon Jack, Sydney, type 1.[11] Paddy McCartin, St Kilda, type 1.[12] Sam Reid, Western Bulldogs and Greater Western Sydney, type 1.[8] Dale Weightman, Richmond, type 1.[8] Baseball[edit] Ron Santo, Chicago Cubs (1960–1973) and Chicago White Sox (1974) infielder, type 1, deceased (2010 at age 70). Sam Fuld, Chicago Cubs (2007–2010), Tampa Bay Rays (2011–2013), Continue reading >>

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & Crossfit Athlete

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & Crossfit Athlete

Marianna Rivera: Type 1 Diabetic & CrossFit Athlete My name is Marianna Rivera. I am a dedicated Crossfitter, a Type 1 Diabetic, a skeptic and a lover of wholesome food. Simply put, my life revolves around utilizing diet to control my Type 1 Diabetes, College, and striving to achieve my dreams as a Crossfit Athlete. I was diagnosed with Type 1 Diabetes on January 9, 2012 when I was 13 years old and although it was a tragic diagnosis, I will be forever grateful that it happened to me. Not only has it made me a more diligent and driven individual, it is also what brought me to Crossfit which has now become one of my biggest passions in life. was your average kid with an above average desire for competition, sports, and anything that had to do with racing. However, around Christmas of 2011 I started to get sick and no longer had the energy to do the things I loved. I lost a dangerous amount of weight, was battling infections constantly, drinking water uncontrollably, and losing more and more of the spirit I was known for having. I went to the doctors and they noticed sugar in my urine; they pricked my finger and the meter read 540.a number I will never forget. The months following diagnosis were hard as we attempted to navigate the road less traveled towards a lifestyle that would enable me to consume less synthetic insulin and lead a more normal but significantly healthier life. After many hours of researching, weeks of troubleshooting, and months of coming to terms with my new reality; we adopted the paleo lifestyle. I eliminated the foods that elevated my blood sugar one a time, first sugar, then diary, next was wheat, then was grain, and finally peanut butter because I really didnt want to give that one up! After 8 short months, I was strict Paleo and no longer requir Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition For Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes: Interplay Of Diet, Insulin Therapy, And Exercise.

Sports Nutrition For Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes: Interplay Of Diet, Insulin Therapy, And Exercise.

Athletes with type 1 diabetes can train and compete at the highest levels in their respective sports, but achieving this goal and maintaining health and safety require a solid understanding of the interplay of diet, insulin therapy, and exercise. This article addresses many of the challenges that athletes with type 1 diabetes commonly face, along with practical strategies to help overcome these challenges. This information is not intended to replace the guidance of your physician (this article represents the experiences of the authors and is not intended as medical advice). In fact, it is imperative that you continue to work closely with your doctor to maintain good diabetic control. This will help maximize your ability to train effectively, to compete at your best, and to maintain your long-term health. Diabetes directly impacts the fueling of muscles When training and competing, our metabolic machinery works in high gear to meet the energy demands of contracting muscles. Fuel sources include glycogen and fat droplets in muscle, fats from adipose tissue stored in places such as the waist and hips, and glucose that is either made in the liver from protein or obtained from glycogen stores in the liver. Behind the scenes, this energy-sustaining metabolic interplay is under the control of hormones, with insulin being a key one. Insulin is produced in the pancreas and it’s considered an anabolic hormone because it allows the cells in the body to take up glucose and store it in the form of glycogen as you recover after exercise. It also promotes the storage of glycogen in the liver and inhibits the release of glucose from the liver. In addition, insulin inhibits the release of fats from your adipose tissue reserves and promotes the synthesis of proteins, including the prot Continue reading >>

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Great Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

As a young diabetic, one of the most challenging adjustments to make after my diagnosis was figuring out how to continue participating in the sports that I had already been playing. Fortunately, by working with my parents and doctors, I was able to continue competing in the sports I loved. With advancements in diabetes management, this is now easier than ever. At one time, a type 1 diabetic person excelling in sports would have been unthinkable. Now, however, diabetes is a small side note in the story of many excellent athletes. With the advent and integration of health informatics into diabetes care, it is easier than ever for diabetic athletes to communicate with their healthcare team and figure out routines that work for them. Through the electronic collection, storage, and continuous analysis of blood sugar data, doctors and patients are now able to make more accurate, informed, and constant adjustments to management routines. This ability is a game changer for diabetic athletes, for whom precise blood sugar control is key. Moving forward, this will only continue to improve as healthcare technology continues to embrace the incredible rise of mobile technology, and patients have even greater abilities to communicate with their doctors. These improvements do not mean that being a world-class athlete as a diabetic is simple, or easy, however. By looking at some of the greatest type 1 diabetic athletes in history, all of us can learn a great deal from both their successes and hardships. It is also important for the diabetic community to celebrate the achievements of these athletes. Jay Cutler: American Football Jay Cutler has been the most notable recent diabetic athlete. This is because Cutler was already in the NFL at the time of his diagnosis, and is already one of t Continue reading >>

Do Endurance Sports Cause Diabetes?

Do Endurance Sports Cause Diabetes?

Earlier this month, an article was published suggesting that endurance athletes may be more susceptible to diabetes. Since diabetes is usually associated with a sedentary lifestyle, in addition to a poor diet, this goes directly against what most people would expect. We were curious about the conclusions of the article so we decided to jump into our own database to see if InsideTracker’s endurance athletes suffer from the same fate. So, the question was clear: do runners, cyclists, and triathletes have higher fasting blood glucose levels? The article looked at a study of 10 endurance athletes that exercised for at least six hours per week. They were connected to a continuous glucose monitor for 6 days, which captured blood glucose levels the entire time, including in the fasted state. After analyzing the data, three out of the 10 athletes had fasting blood glucose levels in the prediabetic range (100-125 mg/dL). Prediabetes, as defined by the American Diabetes Association, is a precursor to diabetes and roughly 25% of prediabetics will develop diabetes after five years. The average fasting blood glucose in the study was about 96 mg/dL (5.34 mmol/L). While this is less than the cutoff for prediabetes of 100 mg/dL, it is still higher than expected. Looking in our own database, we found an overwhelmingly clear trend between endurance exercise and fasting blood glucose levels. Endurance activity is associated with LOWER blood glucose levels. Here are a few comparisons: for the non-science crowd, if the p value is less than .05, the value is statistically significant). Therefore, even though the difference between the two values may not seem large, its statistical significance means the difference is likely not due to chance. The trend continued when comparing those that r Continue reading >>

Helping A Student Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping A Student Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes

Helping a Student-Athlete With Type 1 Diabetes More than 18,000 new cases of Type 1 diabetes are diagnosed each year in people age 20 and younger. It is no secret that exercise and physical activity are important for all kids, especially for youth with diabetes. Not only do exercise and physical activity improve blood glucose control in kids with Type 1 compared to being sedentary (engaging in fewer than 30 minutes a day of activity), but they also improve blood cholesterol and blood pressure , lower body fat content, increase bone and muscle fitness, and improve well-being. Sports are a big part of our culture. Most U.S. high schools have organized team sports, and these activities can become highly competitive as early as middle school. When youth with Type 1 diabetes are athletic, it is key that parents help their children learn to plan ahead to assure they have the opportunity to be their best athletic selves. If your child is an athlete and has Type 1 diabetes, you will need to help him/her balance several factors to enable optimal performance during athletic endeavors. Whether he/she is a competitive or recreational athlete, it is important to optimize both athletic performance and blood glucose levels. Exercise often is more complicated when children are treated with insulin because muscle contractions during activity will cause muscles to take up more blood glucose, which can lead to hypoglycemia (low blood glucose) . The type of athletic activity can affect blood glucose response, as can the time and duration of exercise and the order of activities. Activities that involve aerobic, sprint, or resistance training can result in widely varying blood glucose responses. Many times, your childs insulin doses and food intake will need to be adjusted to prevent hypogl Continue reading >>

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Diabetic-related Athlete’s Foot

Dry Skin or Athlete’s Foot? Diabetic Patients, Beware! Athlete’s foot is a common, fungal skin infection we see in our diabetic patients. A majority of cases begin between the toes and spread to the bottom of the feet. Anyone can get athlete’s foot, but it is more severe for a diabetic. Naturally, patients with diabetes have a weaker circulatory system along with an impaired immune system. This causes a higher risk for infection. Athlete’s foot is a concern for diabetics because their skin lacks hydration, making dry skin prominent. Athlete’s foot is caused from fungus growing on the top layer of your skin. It is contagious and you can get it from touching the affected area of a person who has it, and more commonly, from contaminated surfaces such as damp floors in public showers or locker rooms. Many diabetics confuse athlete’s foot as being dry skin on their feet. Because athlete’s foot has similar characteristics to dry skin such as peeling, cracking redness, blisters, breakdown of the skin, itching and burning, it is understandable as to why these two conditions can be confused. If untreated, athlete’s foot can lead to a severe bacterial infection of the foot and leg. Risk Factors Men are more susceptible than women Having athlete’s foot before An impaired immune system Living in a warm, damp climate More common in adults than children Depending on the severity of the fungus, athlete’s foot can lead to blisters, cracked skin and open wounds. With a diabetic foot, a wound as minor as a blister can cause a lot of damage. Diabetes decreases blood flow, which causes healing time for injuries to be slower. Diabetes also enables infections to spread quickly, which is a concern as it is one of the most common complications of the diabetic foot. If an in Continue reading >>

Working With Diabetic Athletes: Part 1

Working With Diabetic Athletes: Part 1

Many people with type 1 diabetes and other insulin users are engaged in physically demanding exercise programs. These two things Insulin and Exercise can be a deadly combination for our patients. This week Dr. Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM brings us part 1 of a series on Working with Diabetic Athletes Working with Diabetic Athletes: Part 1 Effects of Insulin on Exercise Glycemia By Sheri Colberg, Ph.D., FACSM Many people with type 1 diabetes and other insulin users are engaged in physically demanding exercise programs. Some of them participate in and excel at the top level of competitive sports, including swimming, golf, football, baseball, basketball, ice hockey, soccer, marathons, triathlons, and many others. To perform competitively, they need a greater understanding of the effects of circulating levels of insulin on exercise responses, the physiological response to different types of activities, and the effects of nutrition on performance. To assist these athletes in achieving optimal glycemic control and their athletic goals, practitioners themselves need to become educated in these areas. Effects of Insulin on Exercise Glycemia Unlike nondiabetic individuals whose bodies normally maintain blood glucose levels in a very tight range, athletes with type 1 diabetes must constantly adjust their insulin and food intake to balance blood glucose levels during physical activity. Any type of physical activity promotes the uptake of glucose into active muscle cells additively with insulin, but insulin and muscle contractions oppose each other’s effect on fuel availability from hepatic glucose output and lipid mobilization. Therefore, the correct timing and dosage of insulin is the key to effective glucose management during exercise, and athletes and practitioners need to car Continue reading >>

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

Celebrities With Diabetes Slideshow

The Oscar-winning actor announced he has type 2 diabetes when late-night host David Letterman commented on his newly slim figure in October 2013. "I went to the doctor and he said, ‘You know those high blood sugar numbers you’ve been dealing with since you were 36? Well, you’ve graduated. You’ve got type 2 diabetes, young man.'" Hanks added that the condition is controllable, but he joked that he couldn't get back down to his high-school weight of 96 pounds. "I was a very skinny boy!" The talk show host has type 2 diabetes. "It's definitely controllable," King has said on his show. Diabetes makes heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, and other serious health problems more likely. King has had bypass heart surgery. Diabetes wasn't the only thing that raised his risk for ticker trouble: King had been a heavy smoker, and smoking hurts the heart. But by taking care of his diabetes (and quitting smoking), King helps his ticker and the rest of his body. Salma Hayek The Oscar-nominee had gestational diabetes, which happens during pregnancy, while expecting her daughter, Valentina. Hayek has a family history of diabetes. Experts say all women should get checked for gestational diabetes when they are 24-28 weeks pregnant. Those at risk for type 2 diabetes are checked at their first prenatal visit. Gestational diabetes usually goes away after delivery, but it could return with a later pregnancy. It can also make you more likely to get type 2 diabetes later on. This singer went public with his type 1 diabetes in 2007. He has said that his symptoms included weight loss and thirst. When diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, his blood sugar was over 700 -- and normal blood sugar levels are from 70 to 120. Jonas was hospitalized, but he learned to manage his condition. Once called Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Athlete

The Diabetic Athlete

Diabetes is a common chronic disorder that affects millions of people. Diabetes is a metabolic disorder characterized by the inability of the pancreas to produce enough insulin. The disorder does not have a cure, but can be managed if the individual is careful with their diet, exercise program, and use of insulin (if insulin-dependent). There are two general categories of diabetes. Juvenile onset diabetes (also known as type 1 diabetes) is characterized by an early onset (under the age of 25) hence the name juvenile. The onset is usually sudden with symptoms occurring within a time frame of several days to several weeks. Individuals diagnosed with Type I diabetes are insulin dependent and will need to administer insulin on a regular basis to keep their blood sugar levels at a healthy level. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes and is typically linked to a family history of diabetes, obesity, and lack of exercise. The age of onset is usually after 40. If caught early, type 2 diabetes can be managed with a healthy diet and good exercise program without the need for additional insulin. Whereas the cause of type 1 diabetes is unknown, the cause of type 2 diabetes is well documented. According to Anderson, M., Hall, S., & Martin, M. (Sports Injury Management, 2000), obesity affects nearly 90% of adults with type 2 diabetes. The amount of insulin needed to maintain normal blood glucose levels increases as body fat increases. Although insulin is produced by the body, insulin receptors are reduced in their number and ability to function properly. The end result is that the body cannot supply enough insulin to keep up with the demands of the body. Individuals that are obese either due to poor eating habits and/or lack of exercise are at risk for type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Nutrition For Athletes With Diabetes

Diabetes: Nutrition For Athletes With Diabetes

Many people with diabetes are afraid to exercise because they fear low blood sugars (hypoglycemia). But, with careful control and by eating properly, you can succeed in sports. In fact, there are many professional athletes who have diabetes. The most important thing is to be aware of the signs and symptoms of hypoglycemia and be prepared. Some-times it’s easy to think you are sweaty or light-headed because you are playing hard. However, this could be a sign of low blood sugar. Other symptoms of hypoglycemia are: weakness/fatigue, shaking, headache, irritability, confusion, dizziness, hunger and impaired vision. The following are some tips and strategies to help you control your blood sugars and perform your best: Blood glucose levels should be closely monitored before exercise. Do not start exercise with low blood sugars (below 70). Have a snack first. Do not exercise if your blood sugars are 300 or above. Be sure to check for ketones in your urine if blood sugars are 240 or above. Do not exercise if there are ketones. A carbohydrate-based meal or snack is recommended one to three hours before exercising. Always carry some form of carbohydrates with you, such as hard candy, dried fruits (raisins), fresh fruits, granola bars or crackers. Be sure to let your coach and/or other teammates know that you are diabetic and what the signs/symptoms of hypoglycemia are so that they can help you if this should occur. If you are on insulin, be sure to talk to your doctor about adjusting your dosage for exercise. Most of the time, having a snack before exercise will suffice. Plan to snack during the activity if it lasts longer than one hour. For day-long events, eat six small meals containing both carbohydrates and protein. (Avoid high-sugar, high-fat foods.) Eat after the event to Continue reading >>

Sports Nutrition And Diabetes

Sports Nutrition And Diabetes

There remains to date little specific research into Type 1 diabetes and sports nutrition, however the principles for non-diabetic athletes remain largely transferable provided the differences in physiology are recognised. Research and practice have pushed established boundaries, where medicine and society regarded Diabetes as a disability. With insulin therapy approaching its centenary there are emerging generations of ever more informed, motivated, physically fit and accomplished athletes with diabetes who now compete at all levels including elite and professional. Basic Physiology A common misconception in practice is the need to eat before exercise; in reality, even the leanest of athletes have fuel reserves in the forms of creatine phosphate, glucose, glycogen and fat; varying intensities and duration of exercise utilise different energy oxidation pathways and require different nutritional approaches. The advice for the general population and particularly people with Type 2 diabetes, is to exercise regularly, not only to ‘burn’ calories and promote weight loss, but activity at least every other day prolongs expression of GLUT4 insulin-independent receptors, thereby reducing insulin resistance and basal requirements. This reduction in requirements is also true of Type 1 and has been associated with an extended ‘honeymoon’ period in some active individuals. As insulin is not under homeostatic control in Type 1, athletes must be vigilant as to the effects of increasing training level. More frequent blood glucose monitoring is necessary to monitor the effects of exercise and devise appropriate strategies. Before Exercise General rules for moderate intensity exercise 45-240minutes[1] :- Initial BG level mmol/l Grams of carbohydrate pre-exercise < 7 20-30 7-10 10- Continue reading >>

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

Athletes With Type 1 Diabetes

If you’re an athlete who has Type-1 diabetes, you know how important it is to keep your blood sugar under excellent control. Blood sugar levels have a direct impact on strength, speed, stamina, flexibility and healing capabilities – all essential components of success in sport and fitness activities. There have been many athletes with diabetes who have excelled in their chosen sport (see athletes with diabetes list at bottom of page). But it isn’t without its challenges. Different forms of exercise can have very different effects on blood sugar, particularly when adrenal hormones start to kick in. Recovery from an exercise session may take blood sugar levels to strange and exotic places. What’s more, around-the-clock control is necessary for maintaining appropriate hydration and energy stores for athletic performance. Integrated Diabetes Services is led by one of the few certified diabetes educators who also happens to be a masters-level exercise physiologist. While not exactly a “world-class” athlete, Gary Scheiner participates and competes in a wide variety of sports and fitness activities. He served on the Board of Directors for the Diabetes Exercise & Sports Association for many years (now Insulindependence), and advises athletes and exercise enthusiasts with diabetes worldwide. In 2006 he received the Julie Betshart Award for the study of exercise and diabetes by the American Association of Diabetes Educators. He continues to speak nationally and internationally for both patients and healthcare professionals on exercise, diabetes and blood sugar control. Through his personal and professional experiences, Gary has helped athletes at all levels to incorporate new techniques for controlling blood sugar and enhancing athletic performance. He and his team of Continue reading >>

Why Athlete’s Foot Is Dangerous In Diabetes

Why Athlete’s Foot Is Dangerous In Diabetes

Athlete’s Foot (tinea pedis) commonly occurs in diabetics. Since the flaking and peeling skin symptomatic of this fungal infection can resemble large areas of dry skin, affected clients often mistake it for very dry skin. At McDermott Footcare, monitoring the presence of Athlete’s Foot in diabetic clients is part of the routine, on-going assessment. What does Athlete’s Foot look like? The appearance of Athlete’s Foot was described in this earlier blog post (read here), but it bears repeating. In its beginning stage, Athlete’s Foot shows up as flaky, scaly, peeling skin between the toes, most likely between the fourth and fifth toes. There may also be superficial cracking or fissures of the skin between the toes. It may or may not be itchy. It is odourless. If there is a noticeable odour, this indicates a bacterial infection which is different from Athlete’s Foot but of equal concern. The flaky, scaly area may spread down the soles of the foot. As it spreads, the affected area often becomes reddened and may feel itchy or burning. It may develop into moccasin-type Athlete’s Foot, covering an area that would typically be covered by a moccasin-type shoe. Athlete’s Foot concerns for diabetics Athlete’s Foot that remains untreated may cause abrasions, small cuts and bleeding in the skin. This provides an opportunity to develop a bacterial infection known as cellulitis. Cellulitis is a non-contagious bacterial infection that may occur secondary to Athlete’s Foot. Diabetics are more prone to developing cellulitis because of a weakened immune system. It is characterized by redness, swelling, warmth, tenderness and tightness of the skin in the affected area. Oral antibiotics are prescribed as treatment. If cellulitis does not respond well to antibiotic therapy Continue reading >>

A Coach’s Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

A Coach’s Guide To Type 1 Diabetes

What is Type 1? Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects a person’s pancreas. The pancreas is responsible for producing insulin, a hormone people need to get energy from food. Our pancreas, for reasons that have not been identified, does not produce any insulin. As a result, we need to inject or continually infuse insulin through a pump and carefully balance our insulin doses with eating and daily activities. We must also regularly monitor our blood-sugar levels. Type 1 is a non-stop and 24/7 balancing act that we must maneuver every day. There is no way to prevent Type 1 and there is no cure (currently!). How do you manage it? We get by with a little help from our friends! These include our glucose meter, insulin, needles and monitors. The glucose meter is a device that measures blood sugar. We use a device that pricks our finger and we put the blood sample onto a test strip. From there, the test strip is read by the meter and gives us a number on the meter screen. We can get insulin into our bodies through multiple daily injections or an insulin pump. Injections are delivered to our bodies through insulin pens and needles. There are two types of insulin that we use: Fast-acting insulin gives our bodies insulin right away and is taken with meals or to correct a high blood sugar. Fast-acting insulin is used multiple times a day, depending on when you eat. The other is long-acting insulin, which is given once a day. Long-acting insulin is a slow release insulin that is given to your body in a span of 24 hours when needed. An insulin pump is a device that is connected to the body, either through a tube or wirelessly. With the control of a device, you are constantly getting insulin through the pump. During meals, we can choose how much insulin to give, and t Continue reading >>

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