diabetestalk.net

Asthma Inhalers And Diabetes

Inhaled Steroids May Increase Diabetes Risk

Inhaled Steroids May Increase Diabetes Risk

Dec. 14, 2010 -- Using inhaled corticosteroids to treat chronic breathing problems may slightly increase a person’s risk of developing type 2 diabetes, a new study finds. The study’s authors say the increase in risk probably doesn’t outweigh the benefits to people taking daily puffs of inhaled corticosteroids to control asthma. But researchers are worried about the threat of diabetes when these medications are used to ease breathing in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease, or COPD, a condition for which the benefits of inhaled corticosteroids are less clear. “For asthma, I’m not as concerned because they are so effective. They keep people out of the emergency room. They save lives,” says lead author Samy Suissa, PhD, director for the center of clinical epidemiology at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal. “In studies, inhaled corticosteroids don’t work for many people with COPD. If there’s no problem with safety, then that is maybe not such a big deal,” Suissa says. "If there’s a problem with safety, then the equation changes.” Suissa points out that 70% of people with COPD are prescribed inhaled corticosteroids when clinical guidelines suggest that only 15% to 20% really get any benefit from them. For the study, which is published in the November issue of The American Journal of Medicine, Suissa and his colleagues analyzed the drug records of more than 388,000 patients who were prescribed inhaled corticosteroids in Montreal from 1990 to 2005. They found that the risk of needing medication to control high blood sugar increased about 34% in patients taking any dose of daily inhaled corticosteroids. In those on the highest doses, the risk increased by 64%. The study also found that inhaled corticosteroids were associated with an incre Continue reading >>

Salbutamol And Blood Sugar Levels

Salbutamol And Blood Sugar Levels

I've just found out (googled a hunch) that high-ish doses of salbutamol and salmeterol can raise blood sugar. This happens through the same mechanism that lowers potassium, and as I regularly get low potassium, I'm guessing that I also get the blood-sugar raising effect. On saturday I had lots of acute attacks due to pollen - none terrible but enough to take my blue inhaler quite a lot, and I take it 4 times a day anyway, plus 4 puffs of seretide 250 per day. Anyway... that somewhat explains why my blood sugar was 22 mmol/l after eating some white rice in a japanese restaurant on saturday evening! I have to check it regularly because all my family have diabetes and I've had some erratic readings, and I now have adrenal failure as well. That was my highest reading ever, though I regularly get pretty-high readings considering what I'm eating, which makes sense because I also get asthma every time I eat, so I usually take my inhaler during meals. In theory you can use blood glucose to track cortisol levels, as cortisol is needed to turn glycogen into glucose. But our relievers apparently also raise blood glucose via a different method. (This explains how I had a low-normal fasting blood-glucose level at the same time as cortisol of zero - they said I could still take my inhalers). If anyone has diabetes and can let me know how they're managing this side of things, that would be ace. And has anyone else had their blood glucose monitored while using a lot of salbutamol - for example when on nebs? Did you get high levels? The science stuff I've read says generally you'd need a 5mg neb before it started to happen, but as I get the low-K at much lower doses I guess I must also be getting the high-BG. The good news is that the asthma nurse at my practice is also the diabetes nu Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes

Asthma And Diabetes

As the result of epidemiological studies on relationship between diabetes and asthma it was proved that these diseases often accompany each other. Bronchial asthma is a disease that is characterized by sufficiently strong and pronounced Th2-cytokine expression. Autoimmune diseases, which include 1 type diabetes, gluten enteropathy and rheumatoid arthritis are characterized by Th1-cells expression. It would be logical to assume that diseases of this types cannot develop together, thanks to certain balance between immune response phenotypes. Scientists in this area are regularly working on identifying key features of immune response of Th1- or Th2-type at different diseases and giving them a more precise characterization. Epidemiological Studies Features and Results Recently a study was conducted, in which cell analysis didnt found differences of Th1- and Th2-dominant response at patients with diabetes and asthma. To conduct another study 150 children with 1 type diabetes and 158 children suffering from bronchial asthma were analyzed. The study has also not defined differentiations in gene polymorphism at children suffering from diseases, compared with healthy children. Another study was conducted using mice with diabetes. In this case, for the first time there appeared opportunity to get asthma symptoms via intranasal allergen provocation. The fact that asthma and diabetes diseases often develop together, was proved by all studies conducted. In both disorders pathogenesis T-helpers of first and second types are participating. In one of researches scientists analyzed more than 60 000 young people. Results of the study were as follows: children who have diabetes suffered from asthma consisted 5%. Children who suffered from rheumatoid arthritis (also autoimmune pathology) Continue reading >>

Expert Answers: Do Asthma Steroids Cause Diabetes?

Expert Answers: Do Asthma Steroids Cause Diabetes?

Community Question: I’ve read a lot of people say that they got diabetes because they used asthma steroids. Is this true? I am so worried as I need to use steroids for my asthma. Response from Leon Lebowitz, RRT: The medical treatment of asthma focuses on a step-wise approach, as recommended by the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute. Medications can include rescue inhalers, inhaled corticosteroids (ICS), long acting beta agonists (LABAs), and oral corticosteroids, to name a few. The medical literature reports that ICS are the most effective medications for the reliable control of long-term asthma. Inhaled corticosteroids are the very backbone of asthma treatment for most adults and children with persistent asthma. Oral corticosteroids tend be used in the treatment of severe acute asthma and may be used at the beginning or end of an attack, usually on a short-term basis. They are only used on a long-term basis to treat patients with the most severe asthma. Corticosteroids carry a risk of side effects, some of which can cause serious health problems. Because oral corticosteroids affect the entire body (instead of just a particular area, as with aerosols), this route of administration is the most likely to cause serious side effects. When these are used over a long period of time, you may experience high blood sugar. High blood sugar can trigger or worsen diabetes, which is the main concern you expressed. In order to get the most benefit from corticosteroid medications with the least amount of risk, I would suggest trying lower doses or intermittent dosing, with your physician directing treatment. If it is at all possible, perhaps you can switch to inhaled corticosteroids, again with your physician’s approval. As well, you can make healthy choices during therapy Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Asthma?

Diabetes And Asthma?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I've been told today the dr is '95%' sure I have asthma. I've been coughing for months (about 4) and am sick of it. Glad to be given some steroids which should kick it. Anyone have any experience of 40mg steroids a day? What kind of bg should I expect when I start them? I got a steroid injection for a frozen shoulder and could not control my levels at all they went up to 29 and no matter how much insulin I took it would not come down. Spoke to my nurse and she said it was the steroid injection that did it the doctor never said a word when he done the injection and it took about a week to get back to normal . So keep a eye on your levels and may have adjust your insulin I am asthmatic and through doses of steroids over the yrs I have been diabetic for about 10 yrs now and when get a chest infection that sets off asthma problems I am given steroids or antibiotics sometimes both and this does cause high blood sugars sometimes though I get high readings and this is often a sign that I am coming down with an infection and this helps so that I can see a dr before too many asthma attacks so yes it can affect blood sugars so I do hope you do not have the problems I have experienced but everyone is different so if I can help in any way don't hesitate to ask . Yes, it is a high dose and I question if you really need it. To take oral steroids in high doses can of course be necessary, but when it is a case of untreated asthma I recommend you go for some kind of inhaler/turbohaler. I use Symbicort, a mix of cortisol and something to loosen up and widen the air ways and it works wonders. You will still get steroids, but only where they are needed and thus a much, m Continue reading >>

Inhalers With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure Medicine

Inhalers With Diabetes And High Blood Pressure Medicine

My wife is using three inhalers: Flovent, Serevent, and Albuterol. Is it safe to use all of these inhalers at once? How will this affect diabetes and high blood pressure medication? Flovent is an inhaled corticosteroid. Corticosteroids offer long-term protection against attacks, by keeping airways from becoming inflamed and reducing airway sensitivity to triggers. Often, Flovent and Serevent are used in conjunction. Serevent is a longer-acting bronchodilator, not for rapid relief; its effects generally are sustained for 8-12 hours. Albuterol is a fast-action bronchodilator which offers quick relief by opening blocked airways in the lungs. (It is strongly recommended that those with asthma have a quick-relief bronchodilator on hand at all times.) These three medications, whether individually or combined, are not at all unusual for the care of asthma. In a person with diabetes mellitus, only Flovent deserves caution. Since corticosteroids can raise blood sugar (although much less with inhaled corticosteroids than with oral corticosteroids), blood sugar levels should be checked while on these medications. However, it is important to mention that side effects can occur with all inhaled corticosteroids and are not limited to Flovent. After using any inhaled corticosteroids, rinsing one’s mouth with water is recommended, since these medications can cause a minor problem with oral fungal infection. However, a diabetic would be more likely than a nondiabetic to encounter this side effect. Regarding high blood pressure, Flovent, Serevent and Albuterol will most likely not cause difficulty when used at physician-prescribed doses. However, if you have questions about the safety of your medications, you should discuss them with your physician. Continue reading >>

Risk Of New Onset Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Asthma Or Copd Taking Inhaled Corticosteroids

Risk Of New Onset Diabetes Mellitus In Patients With Asthma Or Copd Taking Inhaled Corticosteroids

Volume 106, Issue 11 , November 2012, Pages 1487-1493 Risk of new onset diabetes mellitus in patients with asthma or COPD taking inhaled corticosteroids Author links open overlay panel P.M.O'Byrnea A recent case-controlled study reported an increased risk of diabetes mellitus in patients treated with inhaled corticosteroids for asthma or COPD, versus age-matched controls. The purpose of the current study was to evaluate whether there was an increased risk of new onset diabetes mellitus or hyperglycaemia among patients with asthma or COPD treated with inhaled corticosteroids. A retrospective analysis evaluated all double-blind, placebo-controlled, trials in patients 4 years of age involving budesonide or budesonide/formoterol in asthma (26 trials; budesonide: n=9067; placebo: n=5926), and in COPD (8 trials; budesonide: n=4616; non-ICS: n=3643). A secondary dataset evaluated all double-blind, controlled trials in asthma involving the use of inhaled corticosteroids (60 trials; budesonide: n=33,496; fluticasone: n=2773). In the primary asthma dataset, the occurrence of diabetes mellitus/hyperglycaemia adverse events (AEs) was 0.13% for budesonide and 0.13% for placebo (HR 0.98 [95% CI: 0.382.50], p=0.96) and serious adverse events (SAEs) was 0% for budesonide and 0.05% for placebo. In the secondary dataset, the occurrence of diabetes/hyperglycaemia as AE and SAE was 0.19% and 0.03%, respectively. In the COPD dataset, the occurrence of diabetes mellitus/hyperglycaemia AEs was 1.3% for budesonide and 1.2% for non-ICS (HR 0.99 [95% CI: 0.671.46], p=0.96) and SAEs was 0.1% for budesonide and 0.03% for non-ICS. Treatment with inhaled corticosteroids in patients with asthma or COPD was not associated with increased risk of new onset diabetes mellitus or hyperglycaemia. Continue reading >>

Health And Wellness From Humana: Are Asthma And Diabetes Connected?

Health And Wellness From Humana: Are Asthma And Diabetes Connected?

Both types need to be taken seriously and treated by a doctor. The National Diabetes Education Program says that, without the right treatment, diabetes can lead to other conditions. These include heart attack and stroke, eye problems that can lead to trouble seeing or blindness, nerve damage and kidney problems. Now that we know more about each condition, let us look into possible connections between them. Below, we will present information pulled from two studies that say that there may be a link. Keep in mind that, while studies may show a connection, there is no firm proof that shows either asthma or diabetes to be a direct cause of the other. The first study was published in the Official Journal of the American Academy of Pediatrics. Here, we will present a shortened summary based on an article found on Reuters.com In this study, researchers looked at 2,000 3- to 21-year-olds with diabetes. They found that 11 percent had asthma. This is higher than the roughly 9 percent rate among all people in the U.S. within that age range. When the researchers looked just at a group that has type 2 diabetes, a full 16 percent had asthma. There were two main findings from this study: Kids with diabetes may have a higher-than-average rate of asthma. Those with both conditions seem to have a tougher time keeping their blood sugar under control. The study found no firm reason why children with both conditions have a harder time keeping blood sugar controlled. But the researchers have two possible ideas. The Reuters article reports: "Some past research has found that people with poorly controlled diabetes are more likely to show dips in lung function over time than those with well-controlled diabetes. But the reasons for that are not known." The second idea is that "... it may simply Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: Whats The Connection?

Asthma And Diabetes: Whats The Connection?

Controlling the asthma and diabetes conditions Asthma is a lung ailment which causes an individuals airway to narrow. Basically, airways are the passage from where the air gets in and gets out of the lungs. As per the National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute, an asthma stroke to an individual can make the breathing situation tough and can cause wheezing, coughing and even chest tightening any time. If the condition is not treated at the right time and in a right way, then it may prove to be dangerous and risky. As per the American Diabetes Association, Diabetes is a group of ailment distinguished by high blood levels which result from imperfections in the individuals body and lack of capability to produce or use insulin from the body. Basically, a person who suffers with diabetes cant use or create insulin, which is helpful to control the blood sugar levels. When the sugar level in blood is high, then it may happen different symptoms like: Cuts or bruises which are difficult to heal. As you have understood the causes and conditions of Asthma and Diabetes, let us give a look towards the connection between the two. Generally, people with diabetes have higher rates of asthma and sometimes it becomes tough to balance the blood sugar levels and keep it under control. It has been found by the researches that people with poorly controlled diabetes are more prone to the weak functioning of lungs than those who have balanced and well controlled diabetes. Those who have asthma are at higher risk to develop diabetes and need to be cautious all the time. Can diabetes and obesity make the asthma more complicated? Obesity is the most severe problem today in the US. It is known that those who are obese are more prone to cause diabetes and other diseases. But studies mentioned that O Continue reading >>

Inhalers Linked To Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked To Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked to Diabetes in Asthma, COPD Patients Anew study suggests those frequent puffs from an asthma inhaler could lead to another chronic condition: diabetes. Weasked thelead researcher and other experts toexplain the risks. Plus, a popular inhaler is recalled... You depend on inhalers to breathe, but now, scientists say,you could face another health risk: diabetes. Inhaled corticosteroids widely prescribed drugs for asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) increased userschances of developing or advancing type 2 diabetes by as much as 34% per year, according to a Canadian study published in the November issue of The American Journal of Medicine. By comparison, in the general population, you can expect about 14 out of 1,000 people [or 1.4%] annually to develop diabetes, says the studys lead investigator, Samy Suissa, Ph.D., director of the Center for Clinical Epidemiology at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal, Canada. But asthma experts aren't recommending that you toss your inhaler yet. Inhaled corticosteroids are very effective in treating asthma,Suissa says. In most cases, the benefits outweigh the[diabetes] risk. Researchers have long known that oral corticosteroids, such as prednisone, increase the odds ofdeveloping diabetes, but this is the first study connecting the disease to the inhaled form. Inhaled corticosteroids, which come as aerosolized sprays or dry powder inhalers, include budesonide (Pulmicort, Symbicort), fluticasone (Flovent, Advair), beclomethasone (Qvar) and mometasone (Asmanex). We wanted to see if inhaled corticosteroids entered the system and caused the same side effects as oral drugs,Suissa says. The study looked at health records of nearly 400,000 Canadians with asthma, COPD or both over 18 years. The theory: Steroids Continue reading >>

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

Asthma And Diabetes: What’s The Link?

So, what’s it like to have diabetes and asthma? Well, diabetes is a condition where the blood has high levels of sugar in it. It is normally caused by the body producing insufficient insulin. Symptoms of diabetes include excessive thirst, increased urination and blurred vision. Asthma is a condition that causes patients to have trouble breathing, because of the swelling of the lungs airways. Symptoms of asthma include shortness of breath, tightening of the chest, wheezing and coughing. So, mix these two together and that is what it’s like to have both diabetes and asthma. However, there is some good news if you have one of them, because there is some light at the end of this tunnel. Is There a Link Between Asthma and Diabetes? When it comes to asthma and diabetes, is there a link between the two? Well, we discussed what the two are and their symptoms above, so now let’s look in to the connection between the two. The answer is that people who have diabetes do have higher rates of having asthma. These patients do tend to have a hard time maintaining their blood glucose levels and keeping their asthma under control. Further reading: Throughout the years, various studies have shown that people who have diabetes that is not under control or is poorly maintained, are the ones who are at a higher risk of developing asthma, because their lung functioning seems to be weaker than those that have diabetes that is properly controlled or maintained. On the reverse side, these studies also concluded that people who suffer from asthma are at a higher risk of developing diabetes and need to be careful. Reasons Steroids and Diabetes Don’t Mix Steroids are used in asthma patients to reduce the inflammation and swelling of the airways of the lungs. The most common steroids are cor Continue reading >>

How Steroids Could Give You Diabetes

How Steroids Could Give You Diabetes

When Tony Martin was prescribed new drugs for his asthma and nasal polyps, he hoped they’d help him manage the respiratory problems he’d suffered for years. In fact, as a result of the treatment he developed type 2 diabetes. The drugs he’d been prescribed, glucocorticoids, are a type of steroid. Six million prescriptions for these powerful anti-inflammatory drugs are given out annually in the UK for conditions such as asthma, rheumatoid arthritis and irritable bowel syndrome. And many people will take glucocorticoids not knowing a common side-effect is type 2 diabetes. Tony had developed asthma in 2000; he was then diagnosed with bronchiectasis, a condition where some of the air passages become permanently widened, meaning extra mucus builds up and the patient is more prone to chest infections. He was given inhalers to keep the conditions under control, but these weren’t enough. ‘I ended up in hospital four times with severe attacks,’ recalls Tony, 65, a semi-retired communications consultant from Wandsworth, South London. In hospital he was given oral steroids in the form of prednisone, to reduce the inflammation in his airways. He then developed nasal polyps and so started taking prednisone more regularly. Polyps are swellings in the nasal cavity which can cause a runny nose and, in Tony’s case, loss of sense of smell. ‘Doctors told me the steroids could help to shrink the polyps,’ he recalls. ‘I took them only if my chest was troubling me, or when I travelled overseas for business meetings, to spare myself the embarrassment of a dripping nose.’ Tony’s doctors warned him not to take them too often because of serious side-effects such as a hormone disorder called Cushing’s syndrome, so he kept to no more than once every three months. But his d Continue reading >>

Corticosteroids & Diabetes

Corticosteroids & Diabetes

Inhaled Corticosteroids May Increase Diabetes Risk Inhaled corticosteroids are a standard treatment for asthma; they are also used to treat chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). But a study suggests that these drugs may contribute to the development and progression of diabetes. This is the first study to link inhaled steroid use to diabetes. Systemic (oral) corticosteroids are already known to increase diabetes risk. Canadian researchers analyzed data from the health insurance agency of Quebec and found over 388,000 people who were treated for respiratory conditions with inhaled corticosteroids like fluticasone (Flonase, Advair), budesonide (Pulmicort, Rhinocort) or beclomethasone (QVAR, Beclovent). After a follow-up period averaging 5.5 years, the study revealed that people currently using inhaled corticosteroids had a 34 percent increase in the incidence of diabetes. The risk was greatest among people who used higher doses of the drugs; doses equivalent to 1000 mcg of fluticasone or more per day, for example, were associated with a 64 percent risk increase. Among 2099 people with diabetes, there was also a 34 percent increased risk of progression from taking just oral blood glucose-lowering medications to starting insulin. Higher dosages of inhaled corticosteroid medications were associated with a 54 percent higher risk of diabetes progression. The widespread use of these drugs in treating COPD has been questioned. "While inhaled corticosteroids are very effective for the treatment of asthma, their effectiveness in treating COPD is controversial," the authors wrote. "The fact that inhaled corticosteroids are now commonly combined in a single device with a long-acting bronchodilator...has resulted in inhaled corticosteroids now being used by over 70 percent of Continue reading >>

Asthma Can Complicate Diabetes Care In Kids

Asthma Can Complicate Diabetes Care In Kids

HealthDay Reporter MONDAY, Sept. 26 (HealthDay News) -- Children hit with the double whammy of type 1 diabetes and asthma have an especially tough time keeping their blood sugar under control, a new study finds. The reason why asthma might complicate pediatric diabetes care remains unclear, however, and is "something that needs to be explored more," said Dr. Anita Swamy, a pediatric endocrinologist and medical director of the Chicago Children's Diabetes Center at La Rabida Children's Hospital in Chicago. She was not involved in the new study, which appears in the October issue of Pediatrics. About 215,000 children in the United States have diabetes, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. Most children who have diabetes have type 1 diabetes, although type 2 diabetes is becoming more prevalent in kids. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that causes the body to mistakenly attack the insulin-producing cells in the pancreas. Insulin is a hormone that helps the body process carbohydrates in food. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the body doesn't produce enough insulin, or when it stops using insulin effectively, according to the American Diabetes Association. Asthma is a chronic disease that causes inflammation in the airways, and when someone with asthma is exposed to a trigger, the disease causes the muscles in the lungs to tighten, making breathing very difficult. About 7 million American children have asthma, the CDC reports. According to the new study, which was led by Mary Helen Black of Kaiser Permanente Southern California, about 11% of children with diabetes also struggle with asthma. Her team theorized that the inflammation that's present with untreated asthma might make it harder to control blood sugar levels. The study tracked almost 1, Continue reading >>

Inhalers Linked To Higher Odds Of Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked To Higher Odds Of Diabetes In Asthma, Copd Patients

Inhalers Linked to Higher Odds of Diabetes in Asthma, COPD Patients But the risk may stem from a 'pro-inflammatory' diet rather than corticosteroids, one expert contends Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. THURSDAY, Dec. 16, 2010 (HealthDay News) -- Asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) patients who are treated with inhaled corticosteroids may face a significantly higher relative risk for both the development and progression of diabetes, new Canadian research suggests. The warning stems from an analysis of data involving more than 380,000 respiratory patients in Quebec. Inhaler use was associated with a 34 percent increase in the rate of new diabetes diagnoses and diabetes progression, the researchers found. What's more, asthma and COPD patients treated with the highest dose inhalers appear to face even higher diabetes-related risks: a 64 percent jump in the onset of diabetes and a 54 percent rise in diabetes progression. "High doses of inhaled corticosteroids commonly used in patients with COPD are associated with an increase in the risk of requiring treatment for diabetes and of having to intensify therapy to include insulin," the study team noted in a news release. Based on their results, researchers from McGill University and the Lady Davis Research Institute at Jewish General Hospital in Montreal suggest "patients instituting therapy with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids should be assessed for possible hyperglycemia and treatment with high doses of inhaled corticosteroids Continue reading >>

More in diabetes