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Aspergers Type 1 Diabetes

Definition Of Asperger Syndrome

Definition Of Asperger Syndrome

home / medterms medical dictionary a-z list / asperger syndrome definition Asperger syndrome: An autistic disorder most notable for the often great discrepancy between the intellectual and social abilities of those who have it. Asperger syndrome is a pervasive developmental disorder that is characterized by an inability to understand how to interact socially. Typical features of the syndrome also may include clumsy and uncoordinated motor movements, social impairment with extreme egocentricity, limited interests and unusual preoccupations, repetitive routines or rituals, speech and language peculiarities, and non-verbal communication problems. People with Asperger syndrome ("Aspies" as many call themselves) generally have few facial expressions apart from anger or misery. Most have excellent rote memory and musical ability, and become intensely interested in one or two subjects (sometimes to the exclusion of other topics). They may talk at length about a favorite subject or repeat a word or phrase many times. People with Asperger syndrome tend to be "in their own world" and preoccupied with their own agenda. The onset of Asperger syndrome commonly occurs after the age of 3. Some individuals who exhibit features of autism (a developmental brain disorder characterized by impaired social interaction and communication skills) but who have well-developed language skills may be diagnosed with Asperger syndrome. There is no specific course of treatment or cure for Asperger syndrome. Treatment, which is symptomatic and rehabilitational, may include both psychosocial and psychopharmacological interventions such as psychotherapy , parent education and training, behavioral modification, social skills training, educational interventions, and/or medications including psychostimulan Continue reading >>

Astounded At The Co-incidence Of Aspergers And Type 1 Diabetes

Astounded At The Co-incidence Of Aspergers And Type 1 Diabetes

Astounded at the co-incidence of Aspergers and Type 1 Diabetes I have type 1 diabetes (for 48 years). I have a son who was diagnosed with Aspergers at age 3 and with T1D at age 4. In my community of 200,000 people, we know of 5 cases of both Aspergers and T1D occurring together. That incidence seems much higher than would be expected if the two rare disorders were independent. There is a small body of scientific literature that supports that autism (including Aspergers) has an autoimmune etiology. And it is well established that if a person has one autoimmune disease, they are at much higher risk of other autoimmune diseases. For all the Aspergers people I know, there is a near-unamimous comfort with regimentation and a consistent life schedule. I guess the blessing in disguise with Aspergers and diabetes is that scheduled living is great for diabetes management. I am also surprised at how common the two positions coexist. I also have aspergers and T1D. And I have also met more people with both than just with T1D Continue reading >>

Living With T1d And Aspergers

Living With T1d And Aspergers

A family learns to manage after a dual diagnosis. This is the second part in a three-part mini series on Type 1 diabetes and autism.Read Part One here . Cari Bridges son, Westin, was diagnosed with Type 1 diabetes in 2011 at age two. As individuals familiar with this condition know, diabetes requires a lot of daily regimens, particularly surrounding meals. But shortly after Westin turned 3, he became very methodical in other activities, as well. At night we had to do the exact same bedtime ritual right down to saying the exact same things every night before he could go to sleep. His insistence on these rituals caused us concern that something was a bit off. So, his parents contacted his doctor, who referred Westin to a developmental pediatrician. There was a long waitlist, so they couldnt be seen for several months. In the meantime, Bridges contacted the local school system to initiate the process of evaluating him for services. He met the educational threshold for Autism and qualified for support. However, Bridges relates, we chose to put developmental delays as his label on his initial IEP because we preferred to have the diagnosis from the medical perspective as well. That diagnosis came when they finally got in with the specialist, which was around his fourth birthday. Westin had high functioning autism (also known as Aspergers). For the next few years, he required a lot of time and attention from both of his parents. For this reason, his mother is grateful that he was an only child until the age of 7. Shes also grateful that his T1D came early, since, as a result, he has never known anything else. For Westin, it is just his way of life. He has never resisted glucose tests or insulin injections. In some ways, Westins T1D and Autism work together. Bridges explains, Continue reading >>

Asperger's Syndrome: Symptoms, Tests, Diagnosis, And Treatment

Asperger's Syndrome: Symptoms, Tests, Diagnosis, And Treatment

When you meet someone who has Asperger's syndrome , you might notice two things right off. He's just as smart as other folks, but he has more trouble with social skills. He also tends to have an obsessive focus on one topic or perform the same behaviors again and again. Doctors used to think of Asperger's as a separate condition. But in 2013, the newest edition of the standard book that mental health experts use, called The Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), changed how it's classified. Today, Asperger's syndrome is technically no longer a diagnosis on its own. It is now part of a broader category called autism spectrum disorder (ASD). This group of related mental health issues shares some symptoms. Even so, lots of people still use the term Asperger's. The condition is what doctors call a "high-functioning" type of ASD. This means the symptoms are less severe than other kinds of autism spectrum disorders . The DSM-5 also includes a new diagnosis, called social pragmatic communication disorder, which has some symptoms that overlap with Asperger's. Doctors use it to describe people who have trouble talking and writing, but have normal intelligence. They start early in life. If you're a mom or dad of a kid who has it, you may notice that he can't make eye contact. You may also find that your child seems awkward in social situations and doesn't know what to say or how to respond when someone talks to him. He may miss social cues that are obvious to other folks, like body language or the expressions on people's faces. For instance, he may not realize that when somebody crosses his arms and scowls, he's angry. Another sign is that your child may show few emotions. He may not smile when he's happy or laugh at a joke. Or he may speak in a flat, rob Continue reading >>

Autism + Diabetes?

Autism + Diabetes?

We're always hearing the scary warnings that the rate of diabetes is increasing dramatically. Here's another scary statistic: 1 in 88 children is diagnosed with autism each year. April is National Autism Awareness Month, so we wanted to take some time to highlight not just autism, but the relationship between autism and diabetes... if there is one. If you're not familiar with autism (or "Autism Spectrum Disorder" known as ASD), it's actually a wide-spectrum disorder, meaning people diagnosed with it will have their condition manifest in different ways. From "high-functioning" autism, like Asperger's Syndrome, to "low-functioning" autism, which can leave people nonverbal, people with this disorder often have communication issues, behavioral issues, and sensory issues. Many with autism can have an unusual interest in repetitive behaviors, from schedules to activities to food. You all saw the movie Rain Man, right? About 40 percent of people on the spectrum have above average intelligence, yet about 25 percent are completely nonverbal. There isn't a lot of published information about diabetes and autism, and much of what we found was from effected families themselves. But often, folks living "in the trenches" are the best sources of information about what life with two chronic conditions is really like. Proof of a Type 1 / Autism Link? The first thing we wondered was whether or not there is any proven link between autism and diabetes, especially since the diagnosis of both conditions is on the rise. Many parents also wonder, sometimes because the families are dealing with both diabetes and autism, but not necessarily in the same child. The medical world does not seem consensus to offer. A 2006 study in Finland came to the conclusion that there is no link between autism and Continue reading >>

Evidence Mounts For Possible Link Between Autism And Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

Evidence Mounts For Possible Link Between Autism And Type 1 Diabetes And Type 2 Diabetes

While the causes of autism remain unknown, new evidence suggests that a child may be more likely to develop the condition if their mother had type 2 diabetes, was obese or had high blood pressure. Researchers from the University of California, Davis found a strong association between maternal diabetes and childhood autism, according to HealthDay News. They reported their findings at the International Society for Autism Research meeting, which was recently held in San Diego, California. Their findings came from analyzing data collected from 1,000 children who either had autism, suffered from another developmental disorder or were developing normally. "For mothers with at least one of the three conditions, their children had a 60 percent increased risk of autism and for developmental delays, there was a 150 percent increased risk," said Irva Hertz-Picciotto, deputy director of the Medical Investigations of Neurodevelopmental Disorders at the University of California, Davis, according to the news source. Additionally, regardless of an official autism diagnosis, children of women with type 2 diabetes tended to have poorer expressive language skills than individuals born to healthy parents. The study is not the first to note a connection between autism and impaired metabolic function. A 2005 study published in the journal Diabetes Care found that young people with type 1 diabetes were significantly more likely to also be diagnosed with autism. The researchers from the Hospital for Sick Children in Toronto speculated that a common autoimmune disorder may be behind the association between the two conditions. They said that their findings underscore the importance of understanding the connection between impaired metabolic function and type 1 diabetes. With a better understandin Continue reading >>

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism. A Mothers Interview

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes And Autism. A Mothers Interview

My Son Has Juvenile Diabetes and Autism. A Mothers Interview The following interview is with Ammey, a mother whose children have multiple medical and cognitive conditions. Of particular interest to me is her situation with her oldest son, Khy, who has both juvenile diabetes and autism. Ammey responded to my blog, Do You Have BOTH Juvenile Diabetes and Autism in Your Family? Here is her story. My name is Ammey, and Ive been married for thirteen years to my husband Mikel. We have three children: Our son Khy is 14, Kaine is 11, and Lilli is four. Khy has autism , asthma, type 1 diabetes , VUR, and chronic migraines. Our son Kaine has pervasive development disorder-not otherwise specified (PDD NOS) and narcolepsy. Lilli has asthma and whole body eczema. We laugh a lot in our house. Sometimes the literal interpretation of our boys comments creates very amusing jokes. The boys are phenomenal artists, and they draw all the time. Our home has a lot of pencils, paper, and erasers lying around. 2. Which diagnosis did your son receive first, and how old was he? What were the symptoms you observed? How did you handle the diagnosis? Khy was diagnosed with autism first, at the age of 8. He had very poor eye contact, repetitive behaviors like finger flicking, complex spinning , very narrow interests and echolalia . He was reading and drawing constantly by the age of 3. We were originally told he had Aspergers , and then they said it was autism. I felt speechless and frustrated. I missed the autism signs all those years, and so I blamed myself at first because he did not receive any early intervention . I dealt with my frustration by insisting he start whatever therapy he could at his age and worked hard with him on his deficits, focusing on his strengths. He became a regional center Continue reading >>

Life With Our Type 1 Diabetic Daughter And Son

Life With Our Type 1 Diabetic Daughter And Son

Life with our type 1 diabetic daughter and son Just when we thought that we had life under control, our 3 year old daughter was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. Two years later, our son was diagnosed too. Juvenile diabetes. A chronic disease. Not caused by eating too much sugar but by their bodies no longer making its own insulin. They require lots of blood checks and insulin shots. If we do everything right, the day may still not go according to plan. Our overall theme, is that God is in control! My daughter is sitting behind me, looking over my shoulder, as I type. She is searching Asperger's syndrome on the internet trying to find information about scholarships. She said that she is glad that she is finally diagnosed but also doesn't like to tell people. People treat her differently when they hear the title that is now attached to her. She was just officially diagnosed four months ago. It has been a life long search and a relief to at long last have a title, an explanation, a reason for the way she is; but also a label. As soon as she entered kindergarten, we knew something was different. She took longer than the other kids to carefully cut out her pictures and glue them perfectly together. The class would carry on to story time and recess and she would still be finishing her project. She was smart. very smart. smartest in the class by far. but always the last to finish. she knew how to cut well and glue well and follow directions, but she would enter her own world while she did her project and aim at perfection. Her artwork was amazing and detailed but always at the cost of other activities. When I consulted with a doctor about her inability to move on to other tasks, he decided with a filled out questionaire that ADD was the culprit. She couldn't pay attention. The Continue reading >>

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

Kids With Type 1 Diabetes At Risk For Mental Health Problems

Kids with type 1 diabetes at risk for mental health problems A person receives a test for diabetes during Care Harbor LA free medical clinic in Los Angeles, California September 11, 2014. REUTERS/Mario Anzuoni In a new Swedish study, kids diagnosed with type 1 diabetes were more likely than their healthy siblings to develop a psychiatric disorder or to attempt suicide. We suspected that we would find higher risk of common psychiatric disorders such as depression or anxiety, as observed among adults with diabetes, said lead author Agnieszka Butwicka of the Department of Medical Epidemiology and Biostatistics at the Karolinska Institute in Stockholm. What was surprising was that risk was high for many different psychiatric disorders, which may mean that applying the results of adult studies to kids is too simplistic, she told Reuters Health by email. More than 200,000 kids in the U.S. had diabetes in 2012, according to the National Diabetes Education Program, and most of them had type 1, which results from the body not producing enough insulin. The condition, previously known as juvenile diabetes, is often diagnosed early in life. People with type 1 diabetes must use insulin injections every day to regulate their blood sugar, and past research has shown that managing the disease is stressful for kids, especially in the period right after they are diagnosed. Butwicka and her colleagues used a national register to compare more than 17,000 children with diabetes born in Sweden between 1973 and 2009 with more than 1,000,000 similar but healthy kids, as well as with the healthy siblings of the diabetic group. They looked in medical records for diagnoses of common psychiatric disorders, such as depression, suicide attempt, anxiety, eating disorder, attention-deficit hyperactiv Continue reading >>

Asperger Syndrome - Wikipedia

Asperger Syndrome - Wikipedia

"Asperger" and "Asperger's" redirect here. For other uses, see Asperger's (disambiguation) . Asperger's syndrome, Asperger disorder (AD), Asperger's Restricted interests or repetitive behaviors, such as this boy's interest in playing with a toy model of molecules, may be features of Asperger's. Problems with social interactions, restricted and repetitive behavior [3] Asperger syndrome (AS), also known as Asperger's, is a developmental disorder characterized by significant difficulties in social interaction and nonverbal communication , along with restricted and repetitive patterns of behavior and interests. [3] As a milder autism spectrum disorder (ASD), it differs from other ASDs by relatively normal language and intelligence . [6] Although not required for diagnosis, physical clumsiness and unusual use of language are common. [7] [8] Signs usually begin before two years old and typically last for a person's entire life. [3] The exact cause of Asperger's is unknown. [3] While it is probably partly inherited , the underlying genetics have not been determined conclusively. [7] [9] Environmental factors are also believed to play a role. [3] Brain imaging has not identified a common underlying problem . [7] The diagnosis of Asperger's was removed in the 2013 fifth edition of the Diagnostic and Statistical Manual of Mental Disorders (DSM-5), and people with these symptoms are now included within the autism spectrum disorder along with autism and pervasive developmental disorder not otherwise specified (PDD-NOS). [3] [10] It remains within the tenth edition of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD-10) as of 2015 [update] . [6] There is no single treatment, and the effectiveness of particular interventions is supported by only limited data. [7] Treatment is aimed Continue reading >>

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism May Share Risk Factors With Diabetes

Autism may share risk factors with diabetes Risky relationship: Certain genetic risk factors for autism are tied to weight problems, which can lead to diabetes. Teenagers and young adults with autism are about three times more likely than those without the condition to develop type 2 diabetes, according to one of the largest studies of autism and diabetes to date 1 . The findings, published in March in Diabetes Care, add to mounting evidence that people with autism face a long list of chronic health problems . Type 2 diabetes, which often goes hand-in-hand with obesity associated with a subset of autism cases can lead to heart disease and stroke, as well as nerve and kidney damage. We really need effective interventions for these adolescents and young adults to turn the tide and hopefully prevent the development of type 2 diabetes, says Meredith Dreyer Gillette , associate professor of pediatrics at the University of Missouri-Kansas City, who was not involved in the study. About 32 percent of young children with autism are overweight and 16 percent are obese, compared with 23 percent and 10 percent of typically developing children, respectively 2 . Certain genetic risk factors for autism, such as deletions on chromosome 16, are also tied to weight problems . Women who are obese or have diabetes while pregnant are more likely to have children with autism. The prevalence of diabetes among individuals with autism, however, has been less clear. A study last year found an increased risk of diabetes as well as many other chronic health problems among adults with autism, possibly stemming from a lack of access to preventive care 3 . To probe this link more deeply, a team of researchers in Taiwan identified 6,122 adolescents and young adults with autism and more than 24,000 co Continue reading >>

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Autism And Type 1 Diabetes Connection

Nine years ago, when I was first consulting with obstetricians who specialize in high risk pregnancies to talk about my wish to get pregnant, not one of the three doctors whom I visited mentioned any connection between a mother having Type 1 diabetes and her child having autism spectrum disorder. I can’t blame those doctors; it is only in the last few years, as more research is being conducted to try and figure out the current autism epidemic, that such a link has been found. Autism is a complex neurological disorder that affects the connections between various regions of the brain, impacting a person’s ability to produce and process language and to read the nonverbal social cues that are an otherwise intuitive part of human communication. Autism is considered to be a spectrum disorder because it affects people in a range of ways, from most severe impairment to a more mild condition known as Asperger syndrome. Wherever a person falls on the autism spectrum, living with a neurological challenge is not an easy thing. My seven-year-old son was diagnosed with mild autism at age three. His diagnosis came after a few years of visiting different specialists who were investigating his speech delay. The first specialists we visited, along with our pediatrician who saw my son frequently, dismissed autism because of my son’s smiling and natural interaction with me. Now doctors know more — that children with autism easily relate to their loved ones and want to connect with others; it is not the desire to be isolated that makes people with autism engage in repetitive behaviors. Rather, that behavior comes out of seeking safety and soothing in a world that is too often too loud and confusing. I know this behavior well from when my son gets overwhelmed. Eventually we received Continue reading >>

Medical Xpress: What Happened To Asperger's Syndrome?

Medical Xpress: What Happened To Asperger's Syndrome?

In 2013, the American Psychiatric Association stopped using the clinical term Aspergers syndrome, grouping the condition with other forms of autism under the term Autism Spectrum Disorder. Credit: Shutterstock I often get asked "Does my child have Asperger's?" in my clinical work. Or, "Do I have Asperger's?" These are challenging questions to answer. They have stimulated much debate among clinicians, researchers, and those who have identify with the term over the past several years. Asperger's Disorder (more commonly referred to as Asperger's syndrome) is linked to the work of Hans Asperger, an Austrian physician who published his initial work in German in 1944. He described children who presented with strong vocabulary and language skills in conjunction with a range of symptoms: Odd social use of language and tone of voice, social isolation from peers, repetitive behaviours, strong interests in unusual topics, and a desire to maintain structure and routine in their lives. Much of the English-speaking world remained unaware of Asperger's work until 1991 when it was translated and brought to the attention of clinicians by English psychiatrist Lorna Wing . Although this description is similar to that of autism, Asperger's account differed in that speech was less commonly delayed, motor clumsiness was more common, onset of symptoms occurred later, and his initial cases were all male. Asperger's syndrome made its official appearance when the World Health Organization (WHO) published the initial version of the International Classification of Diseases (ICD), 10th edition . Subsequently, the American Psychiatric Association (APA) included it in the newly defined category of Pervasive Developmental Disorders (PDDs) alongside Autistic Disorder and other similar diagnostic terms Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Asperger's Syndrome

Diabetes & Asperger's Syndrome

I'm new here. I should have joined years ago! My DS, Evan, is 5 and was diagnosed at age 2 1/2. Last year he was also diagnosed with Asperger's Syndrome (which is on the autism spectrum). Prior to the AS dx, we attributed his behavioral issues to highs and lows, particularly lows. Does anyone else have this experience? There are many days I'm still not convinced the AS dx is accurate - even after 3 independent evaluations. What I'm referring to are crazy antics, aggressiveness, hyperactivity, tantrums which are beyond the "normal" scope for a 5 year old. Our daughter is 9 and was diagnosed at 7. We have really good control generally and have been pumping for almost a year now. For me, the HARDEST part of d has ALWAYS been behavioral. After a terrible high BG tantrum, we can joke about Maggie bright and dark. I can't believe how many times I've said "If you're not over 250, you're grounded!" I had an adult D friend who said that coming off a night of highs and corrections leave you feeling really hung over. When her behavior is erratic, irrational or just plain miserable, I try to imagine what she must feel like. Last weekend all of the cousins went to the circus followed by a birthday party. Although we counted every last carb and thought we kept her numbers close to range, she woke up on Monday UNBEARABLE!!!! She started her day screaming from her bed that she was angry with her father and me because she didn't get her cousins at her birthday etc..... Our child is not spoiled and does not usually behave this way. It is for us, however, an all too common over-carb hangover. As for Ausburger's, I don't know what the particular guidelines are. (I'm an art historian by trade), but I am surprised by the number of children discussed on his site who are diagnosed with behavi Continue reading >>

Asperger's Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes

Asperger's Disorder And Type 1 Diabetes

Treato found 192 discussions about Type 1 Diabetes and Asperger's Disorder on the web. Symptoms and conditions also mentioned with Asperger's Disorder in patients' discussions Diabetes means your blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels are too high. With type 1 diabetes, your pancreas does not make insulin. Insulin is a hormone that helps glucose get into your cells to give them energy. Without insulin, too much glucose stays in your blood. Over time, high blood glucose can lead to serious problems with your heart, eyes, kidneys, nerves, and gums and teeth. Read more on MedlinePlus.gov. His family says he suffers from Asperger's Syndrome and ... "Missing NY man's car found in Newton, Mass. The family of a missing man from New York is begging for the public's help given the fact that he suffers from diabetes. David Mark's car was found in Newton, Massachusetts. But so far, there has been no sign of him. The parents of David Mark are distraught about his unexplained disappearance, worried the 24-year-old man with health concerns might be in serious trouble, or worse. The missing man's vehicle was discovered Wednesday in front of read more... the Brimmer and May School after he left his home unexpectedly in Albany, New York on the same day. His sister lives near the school, but Mark has yet to contact her. His family says he suffers from Asperger's Syndrome and Type I Diabetes. His family has placed a note in his car hoping he will return to the vehicle. A waitress at Boston Brew Works said Mark was in the restaurant near Fenway Park on the day he went missing. That's apparently the last time anyone saw him. We're a classy, totally normal family, clearly. My brother, November 14, 2010 | butyoudontlooksick.com Hi! I'm Ally. I'm 17, from Nebraska, a first-year university stud Continue reading >>

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