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Artificial Sweeteners Pancreas

Artificial Sweeteners Alter Signaling In The Brain And Pancreas

Artificial Sweeteners Alter Signaling In The Brain And Pancreas

"Safe" Sugars Act As Endocrine Disruptors Not all artificial sweeteners aka (nonnutritive sweeteners (NNSs) or low-calorie sweeteners (LCS)) are bad. Use of artificially sweetened foods (ASFs) has increased in the past 50 years in the USA and there are clear parallels with changes in the prevalence of obesity and NNSs usage. R Some NNSs have been deemed safe by government organizations like the FDA. Just because something is deemed as "safe" by the FDA, does not make it safe for humans. In this post, I will break down the effects of artificial sweeteners on the body (easy reading is in bold)and give an alternative list to which ones are "safer" or even beneficial. They have been around for centuries, starting with the Stevia plant family. R Then commercial production of chemically synthesized NNSs began with saccharine in 1879 (discovered by Constantine Fahlberg at Johns Hopkins). R R They were originally made by pharmaceutical companies to make drugs taste better and later as a sugar substitute for diabetic patients. R And since, there has been a rise in obesity and sugar has been deemed as "bad" by mainstream healthcare, calling on professionals to encourage sugar replacements as a feasible replacement. R R R R R This has led to a high variety of "light" products across the globe including water- and fat-based desserts, certain alcoholic beverages,sandwich spreads,cereals, marinades, chewing gums, drugs, etc. R R R R All ages from various populations are now consuming NNSs (even preschoolers). R R R R R They are quite revolutionary as most NNSs have no or are in low calories, but the problem with them lies in the fact that they change our perception of taste and cause a negative feedback for our brain to crave more food ( more discussed below ). R Not only this, but Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy.

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy.

Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev. 2009 Aug;18(8):2235-8. doi: 10.1158/1055-9965.EPI-09-0365. Artificial sweeteners and the risk of gastric, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers in Italy. Istituto di Ricerche Farmacologiche Mario Negri, Milan, Italy. [email protected] The role of sweeteners on cancer risk has been widely debated over the last few decades. To provide additional information on saccharin and other artificial or low-calorie sweeteners (mainly aspartame), we updated the analysis of an integrated network of case-control studies conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2004 including data on cancers of the stomach, pancreas, and endometrium. Cases were 230 patients with incident, histologically confirmed cancers of the stomach and 547 corresponding controls, 326 of the pancreas and 652 controls, and 454 of the endometrium and 908 controls. All controls were patients admitted to the same hospitals as cases for acute, non-neoplastic disorders. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) were derived by unconditional logistic regression models. After allowance for various confounding factors, ORs for ever users of sweeteners versus nonusers were 0.80 (95% CI, 0.45-1.43) for gastric cancer, 0.62 (95% CI, 0.37-1.04) for pancreatic cancer, and 0.96 (95% CI, 0.67-1.40) for endometrial cancer. Corresponding ORs for saccharin were 0.65, 0.19, and 0.71, and for other sweeteners were 0.86, 1.16, and 1.07, respectively, for the three cancer sites. The present study adds further evidence on the absence of an adverse effect of low-calorie sweetener (including aspartame) consumption on the risk of common neoplams in the Italian population. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy

... All these sweeteners that known as a different names like low calorie or artificial or alternative sweeteners have taste similar to sugar but it contain a few or no calories and produce a low response of glycemic in the body [2]. As a result, consumption increase for these products were led to appearance many questions about safety of these sweeteners for human in general, although, it have possible health benefits during use in weight control [3] and diabetes [4], but possible health concerns began to appear through the potential effect to occurrence of cancer [5], migraine [6], preterm delivery [7] and thrombocytopenia [8]. Aspartame is composite from aspartic acid and phenylalanine that discovered in 1969 have sweetening up to 200 times compared to table sugar with 4 kcal/g and uses over 6000 food and drink products due to its good sensory properties, such as, safely heated to high temperatures with some loss of sweetness and non carcinogenic with considering to acceptable daily intake (ADI) which of between 0-40 mg/kg, so it use in tabletop sweeteners, soft drinks, chewable multi vitamins, breakfast cereals, dessert mixes, yogurt, frozen desserts and pharmaceuticals [1,2], through digestion aspartame will hydrolyze to aspartic acid and phenylalanine addition of small amounts of methanol, so, continuous consumption of aspartame may cause some symptoms such as nausea, headaches, insomnia, loss of energy, neurological problems, blurred vision and behavioral disturbances that mentioned by many studies [9]. ... Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar And Insulin

How Artificial Sweeteners Affect Blood Sugar And Insulin

Sugar is a hot topic in nutrition. Cutting back can improve your health and help you lose weight. Replacing sugar with artificial sweeteners is one way to do that. However, some people claim that artificial sweeteners aren't as "metabolically inert" as previously thought. For example, it's been claimed that they can raise blood sugar and insulin levels. This article takes a look at the science behind these claims. Artificial sweeteners are synthetic chemicals that stimulate the sweet taste receptors on the tongue. They are often called low-calorie or non-nutritive sweeteners. Artificial sweeteners give things a sweet taste, without any added calories (1). Therefore, they're often added to foods that are then marketed as "health foods" or diet products. They're found everywhere, from diet soft drinks and desserts, to microwave meals and cakes. You'll even find them in non-food items, such as chewing gum and toothpaste. Here's a list of the most common artificial sweeteners: Artificial sweeteners are synthetic chemicals that make things taste sweet without any extra calories. We have tightly controlled mechanisms to keep our blood sugar levels stable (2, 3, 4). Blood sugar levels increase when we eat foods containing carbohydrates. Potatoes, bread, pasta, cakes and sweets are some foods that are high in carbohydrates. When digested, carbohydrates are broken down into sugar and absorbed into the bloodstream, leading to an increase in blood sugar levels. When our blood sugar levels rise, our body releases insulin. Insulin is a hormone that acts like a key. It allows blood sugar to leave the blood and enter our cells, where it can be used for energy or stored as fat. If blood sugar levels drop too low, our livers release stored sugar to stabilize it. This happens when we fas Continue reading >>

What Are The Side Effects Of Aspartame, Stevia, And Other Sugar Substitutes?

What Are The Side Effects Of Aspartame, Stevia, And Other Sugar Substitutes?

What are the side effects of aspartame, stevia, and other sugar substitutes? Once you realize how harmful sugar is (by sugar, of course, I mean sucrose and high fructose corn syrup or HFCS, primarily, but also the whole cast of characters out there like cane sugar, beet sugar, dextrose, corn syrup solids, and others that masquerade as sugar), you inevitably want to understand the impact of substituting non-sugar sweeteners for sugar, should you still desire a sweet taste. If youre not yet convinced sugar is a toxin, its probably worth checking out my post, Sugar 101 , and the accompanying lecture by Dr. Lustig. Sugar is, tragically, more prevalent in our diets today than we realize our intake of sugar today is about 400% of what it was in 1970. And its not just in the obvious places, like candy bars and soda drinks, where sugar is showing up, either. Its in salad dressings, pasta sauces, cereals, healthy sports bars and drinks, low-fat healthy yogurt, and most lunch meats, just to name a few places sugar sneaks into our diet. I know some people have an aversion to aspartame (i.e., Nutrasweet, Equal) over sucrose (i.e., table sugar, sucrose, or HFCS). In other words they think Coke is better that Diet Coke because it uses real sugar instead of fake sugar. If you find yourself in this camp, but youre now realizing real sugar is a toxin, this poses a bit of a dilemma. There are two things I think about when considering the switch from sugar to non-sugar substitute sweeteners: Are non-sugar sweeteners more or less chronically harmful than sugar? What are the immediate metabolic impacts of consuming these products, relative to sugar? Question 1: Are artificial (i.e., non-sugar or substitute) sweeteners more chronically harmful than sucrose/HFCS? Theres no shortage of fear o Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners Affect Metabolism And Insulin Levels

Artificial Sweeteners Affect Metabolism And Insulin Levels

The artificial sweetener sucralose (Splenda®) is capable of changing the body's insulin response, researchers at Washington University School of Medicine reported in the journal Diabetes Care. The study included 17 severely obese people who didn't consume artificial sweeteners often and weren't diagnosed with diabetes. Splenda does have an effect First author M. Yanina Pepino, PhD, research assistant professor of medicine, said: "Our results indicate that this artificial sweetener is not inert - it does have an effect. And we need to do more studies to determine whether this observation means long-term use could be harmful." Study participants had an average body mass index (BMI) of around 42, which is 12 points above the threshold of obesity. The volunteers were given either water or sucralose to drink before a glucose challenge test, which involved consuming a similar glucose dosage to the amount given as part of glucose-tolerance test. The researchers wanted to determine whether insulin or blood sugar levels are affected by the combination of sucralose and glucose. Pepino said that they particularly wanted to study obese people as "these sweeteners frequently are recommended to them as a way to make their diets healthier by limiting calorie intake." However, it should be noted that artificial sweeteners don't necessarily help limit calorie intake. A previous study by scientists in the US suggested that consuming artificial sweeteners could make people put on weight because experiments on laboratory rats showed that those eating food sweetened with artificial sweeteners ate more calories than their counterparts whose food was sweetened with normal sugar. The participants were each tested twice. They were first tested after drinkin water followed by glucose, and then Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Can They Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Artificial Sweeteners: Can They Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

Artificial sweeteners are often used as sugar substitutes as they can help "curb your cravings" for something sweet without the health risks real sugars can cause. But medical experts are suspicious of sugar substitutes. "The short answer is we don't know what happens when you replace sugar with artificial sweeteners," Dr. Robert Lustig, endocrinologist and sugar researcher at the University of California, San Francisco, told Time.com. "We have data nibbling around the edges, but we don't have enough to make a hard determination for any specific sweetener," he added. Foods rich in sugar drive insulin resistance. The larger the amount of sugar you take, the more insulin your pancreas produces and releases to keep your blood glucose levels in control. The pancreas may become too overworked and may have difficulty producing enough insulin, and this results in type-2 diabetes. But with artificial sweeteners, the glucose hit doesn't come, and the pancreas searches for blood glucose that will trigger insulin production. According to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), artificial sweeteners or sugar substitutes are safe according to the standards of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA has tested and approved six artificial sweeteners, which include acesulfame potassium, aspartame (Equal), saccharin, sucralose (Splenda), neotame and advantame. These sweeteners are being used to make diet drinks, baked goods, frozen desserts, candy, light yoghurt and chewing gum, ADA said. But according to a 2009 study, people who consume diet soda on a daily basis are 36 percent at risk of developing metabolic syndrome - a condition where people have high blood pressure and too much abdominal fat - and are 67 percent more likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who d Continue reading >>

No Effect Of Dietary Aspartame Or Stevia On Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, Or Induced Mortality In A Murine Model

No Effect Of Dietary Aspartame Or Stevia On Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, Or Induced Mortality In A Murine Model

No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. No Effect of Dietary Aspartame or Stevia on Pancreatic Acinar Carcinoma Development, Growth, or Induced Mortality in a Murine Model James Dooley, Vasiliki Lagou, [...], and Adrian Liston Pancreatic cancer has an extremely poor prognosis, largely due to a poor record for early detection. Known risk factors for pancreatic cancer include obesity, diet, and diabetes, implicating glucose consumption and regulation as a key player. The role of artificial sweeteners may therefore be pertinent to disease kinetics. The oncogenic impact of artificial sweeteners is a highly controversial area. Aspartame, one of the most studied food additives, is widely recognized as being generally safe, although there are still specific areas where research is incomplete due to study limitations. Stevia, by contrast, has been the subject of relatively few studies, and the potential health benefits are based on extrapolation rather than direct testing. Here, we used longitudinal tracking of pancreatic acinar carcinoma development, growth, and lethality in a sensitized mouse model. Despite exposure to aspartame and stevia from the in utero stage onward, we found no disease modification activity, in either direction. These results contribute to the data on aspartame and stevia saf Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Artificial Sweeteners: Any Effect On Blood Sugar?

Can I use artificial sweeteners if I have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. You can use most sugar substitutes if you have diabetes, including: Saccharin (Sweet'N Low) Aspartame (NutraSweet, Equal) Acesulfame potassium (Sunett) Sucralose (Splenda) Stevia (Pure Via, Truvia) Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, offer the sweetness of sugar without the calories. Artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than sugar, so it takes a smaller amount to sweeten foods. This is why foods made with artificial sweeteners may have fewer calories than those made with sugar. Sugar substitutes don't affect your blood sugar level. In fact, most artificial sweeteners are considered "free foods" — foods containing less than 20 calories and 5 grams or less of carbohydrates — because they don't count as calories or carbohydrates on a diabetes exchange. Remember, however, other ingredients in foods containing artificial sweeteners can still affect your blood sugar level. More research is needed, but studies are increasingly finding that the benefits of substituting sugar-sweetened food and beverages with those that have been sweetened artificially may not be as clear as once thought, particularly when consumed in large amounts. One reason may be a "rebound" effect, where some people end up consuming more of an unhealthy type of food because of the misperception that because it's sugar-free it's healthy. Also, be cautious with sugar alcohols — including mannitol, sorbitol and xylitol. Sugar alcohols can increase your blood sugar level. And for some people, sugar alcohols may cause diarrhea. Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And Cancer

Artificial Sweeteners And Cancer

Where can people find additional information about artificial sweeteners? What are artificial sweeteners and how are they regulated in the United States? Artificial sweeteners, also called sugar substitutes, are substances that are used instead of sucrose (table sugar) to sweeten foods and beverages. Because artificial sweeteners are many times sweeter than table sugar, much smaller amounts (200 to 20,000 times less) are needed to create the same level of sweetness. Artificial sweeteners are regulated by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA). The FDA, like the National Cancer Institute (NCI), is an agency of the Department of Health and Human Services. The FDA regulates food, drugs , medical devices, cosmetics, biologics, tobacco products, and radiation -emitting products. The Food Additives Amendment to the Food, Drug, and Cosmetic Act, which was passed by Congress in 1958, requires the FDA to approve food additives, including artificial before they can be made available for sale in the United States. However, this legislation does not apply to products that are generally recognized as safe. Such products do not require FDA approval before being marketed. Is there an association between artificial sweeteners and cancer? Questions about artificial sweeteners and cancer arose when early studies showed that cyclamate in combination with saccharin caused bladder cancer in laboratory animals. However, results from subsequent carcinogenicity studies (studies that examine whether a substance can cause cancer) of these sweeteners have not provided clear evidence of an association with cancer in humans. Similarly, studies of other FDA-approved sweeteners have not demonstrated clear evidence of an association with cancer in humans. What have studies shown about a possible Continue reading >>

How Aspartame, Affects The Pancreas.

How Aspartame, Affects The Pancreas.

The trouble with sweeteners H J Roberts. Nutrition Health Review. Haverford:2003. Iss. 85, p. 3 Abstract (Summary) An interview with Dr H. J. Roberts is presented. Roberts talks about the role of the pancreas, the chemical aspartame, and how sweeteners containing aspartame affect the pancreas. Full Text (2560 words) Copyright Vegetus Publications 2003 Q. What is the role of the pancreas? A. The pancreas is a vital organ with several major functions. It has a digestive function by virtue of making the pancreatic enzymes that digest the food and an important endocrine function by virtue of having the islets that secrete insulin and other hormones. Q. What are some of these hormones? A. In addition to insulin, there is glucagon, along with several others. Q. What is aspartame? A. Aspartame is a chemical that originally was conceived as a treatment for peptic ulcer. The molecule closely simulates the hormone gastrin, which is involved with hydrochloric acid secretion. Aspartame consists of three components-phenylalanine and aspartic acid (both amino acids) and a methyl ester, which becomes free methyl alcohol when it enters the stomach. The combination is approximately 50 percent phenylalanine, 40 percent aspartic acid, and 10 percent methyl alcohol. Around 1965, this chemical was found to taste sweet. It was therefore submitted as a sweetening supplement and the drug application with-drawn. Q. Was aspartame ineffective as a drug? A. It was never really marketed as a drug for a peptic ulcer, although that was the original intent. Q. Are artificial sweeteners that contain aspartame safe? A. A number of artificial sweeteners, including saccharin, have been around for a long time. In my opinion, aspartame has many hazards. Saccharin is essentially safe. The sweetener called st Continue reading >>

You Asked: Do Sugar Substitutes Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

You Asked: Do Sugar Substitutes Cause Type 2 Diabetes?

TIME Health For more, visit TIME Health. By now you’ve heard that sugary foods drive insulin resistance and type-2 diabetes. The more of the sweet stuff you swallow—whether it’s table sugar or organic honey—the more insulin your pancreas has to produce and release into your bloodstream in order to control your blood’s glucose levels. At some point, an overworked pancreas can become incapable of producing enough insulin to manage sugar loads in the blood, resulting in type-2 diabetes But what happens if you replace sugar with artificial sweeteners? The American Diabetes Association says on its website that sugar substitutes are safe by FDA standards, and “may help curb your cravings for something sweet.” But other experts are dubious. “The short answer is we don’t know what happens when you replace sugar with artificial sweeteners,” says Dr. Robert Lustig, an endocrinologist and sugar researcher at the University of California, San Francisco. “We have data nibbling around the edges, but we don’t have enough to make a hard determination for any specific sweetener.” People who consume diet soda on a daily basis are 36% more likely to develop metabolic syndrome and 67% more likely to develop type-2 diabetes than people who don’t drink diet or regular soda, found a 2009 study. That may seem damning until you consider that overweight or obese people—the groups most at risk for type-2 diabetes—may be more likely to drink diet soda in an attempt to lose weight than their slimmer pals. Newer evidence, though still far from conclusive, is more telling. A 2014 study from Israel found that artificial sweeteners changed the microbiotic makeup of rodents’ guts in ways linked to metabolic disease. For another recent study, researchers at Washington Un Continue reading >>

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Release?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Release?

Do Artificial Sweeteners Cause Insulin Release – Why Do People Care So Much? The search for the answer has reached almost mythical status, and is most commonly asked by those following a low carbohydrate diet, such as the Atkins diet. Lets briefly look at the theory behind the Atkins diet, which is outlined but vastly oversimplified on the Atkins webpage. Very simply put, eating carbohydrates leads to increased sugar in the blood stream (from the breakdown of the carbohydrates) that triggers insulin to be released and allow the sugar to be taken in to cells. Some of this sugar is used for energy, but the rest is stored in cells or converted into fat. On a low carb diet, there are no carbohydrates to turn in to sugar so there is no ‘insulin response.’ The body still needs fuel though, and so one of the things it does to compensate is that it turns to breaking down eaten and stored fats for energy thereby promoting fat loss. Whether this is exactly as it seems or not and the validity behind all the claims is the subject of great debate, and for the purposes of the current article I’m going to steer clear of that and stick to the title question. Sweetening a Low Carb Diet, Is It OK? A very low-carb diet is a tough diet to follow, largely because it means no sugar, no cakes, no chocolates, no sweets, no bread, no rice etc. and due to this a logical solution appears to be the use of artificial sweeteners as a way of making the diet more tolerable. There is some concern however that these sweeteners may lead to the release of insulin, and therefore lead to weight gain or plateaus in weight loss by people using these. There are all sorts of opinions out there on this subject; literally hundreds of forum pages are filled with this, and for each person that says they are Continue reading >>

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

How Artificial Sweeteners Confuse Your Body Into Storing Fat And Inducing Diabetes

Research shows that aspartame worsens insulin sensitivity to a greater degree than sugar Artificial sweeteners promote weight gain by tricking your body into thinking it will receive sugar (calories); when the sugar doesn’t arrive, carb cravings can result Artificial sweeteners likely also cause weight gain by disrupting your intestinal microflora, thereby raising your risk of both obesity and diabetes By Dr. Mercola As noted in the featured video, there are currently five different artificial sweeteners on the market. The one you're most likely to encounter is aspartame, which also tends to be the worst of the bunch. Aspartame and other artificial sweeteners are primarily promoted to diabetics and those concerned about their weight. This despite the fact that artificial sweeteners have repeatedly been shown to produce the exact opposite effects: Artificial sweeteners have also been found to promote weight gain, in more ways than one Over time, artificial sweeteners have also crept into a wide variety of products not directly targeting diabetics and dieters. Artificial sweeteners are added to about 6,000 different beverages, snacks, and food products, making label-reading an ever pressing necessity. Disturbingly, food industry groups are now trying to hide the presence of artificial sweeteners in certain foods... Like GMOs, Industry Wants to Hide Artificial Sweeteners in Foods Last year, the International Dairy Foods Association (IDFA) filed a petition with the FDA requesting the agency amend the standard of identity for milk and 17 other dairy products, in order to allow for the addition of artificial sweeteners without having to indicate their use on the label. The IDFA claims the proposed amendments would "promote more healthful eating practices and reduce childhoo Continue reading >>

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy

Artificial Sweeteners And The Risk Of Gastric, Pancreatic, And Endometrial Cancers In Italy

@article{0a52e8cd4ec04753896b3f02222d01bf, title = "Artificial sweeteners and the risk of gastric, pancreatic, and endometrial cancers in Italy", abstract = "Background: The role of sweeteners on cancer risk has been widely debated over the last few decades. To provide additional information on saccharin and other artificial or low-calorie sweeteners (mainly aspartame), we updated the analysis of an integrated network of case-control studies conducted in Italy between 1991 and 2004 including data on cancers of the stomach, pancreas, andend ometrium. Patients and Methods: Cases were 230 patients with incident, histologically confirmed cancers of the stomach and 547 corresponding controls, 326 of the pancreas and 652 controls, and 454 of the endometrium and 908 controls. All controls were patients admitted to the same hospitals as cases for acute, non-neoplastic disorders. Odds ratios (OR) and corresponding confidence intervals (CI) were derived by unconditional logistic regression models. Results: After allowance for various confounding factors, ORs for ever users of sweeteners versus nonusers were 0.80 (95\{%} CI, 0.45-1.43) for gastric cancer, 0.62 (95\{%} CI, 0.37-1.04) for pancreatic cancer, and 0.9 6 (95\{%} CI, 0.67-1.40) for endometrial cancer. Corresponding ORs for saccharin were 0.65, 0.19, and 0.71, andfor other sweeteners were 0.86, 1.16, and1.07, respectively, for the three cancer sites. Conclusions: The present study adds further evidence on the absence of an adverse effect of low-calorie sweetener (including aspartame) consumption on the risk of common neoplams in the Italian population.", author = "Cristina Bosetti and Silvano Gallus and Renato Talamini and Maurizio Montella and Silvia Franceschi and Eva Negri and {La Vecchia}, Carlo", N2 - Background: Th Continue reading >>

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