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Are Yams Ok For Diabetics

Vegetables For Diabetes

Vegetables For Diabetes

A well-balanced diet is very important to stay fit and healthy. The diet should contain adequate amount of vital nutrients to nourish your body. Plenty of vegetables and fruits give you the required nourishment. Diabetic patients should watch over what they eat in order to keep their blood sugar levels under control. The patients should primarily consume vegetables containing anti-oxidants, minerals and vitamins that are vital for the body. It is better to avoid those vegetables containing excess of carbohydrates, protein and fat. In that case, four to five serving of vegetables would also not harm the body. Vegetables can be eaten in both raw as well as cooked form. They can be baked, grilled or micro-waved. You can add variety to it by making delicious salads with various sauces. Vegetables give the required fiber content to the human body. They promote the health and help you to prevent many diseases. Vegetables reduce the risk of getting affected by chronic disorders, stroke, coronary heart diseases and cancers in the lungs and digestive tract. Vegetables also increase the mineral density in the bones and lower the bone reabsorption levels. Vegetables which are rich in carotenoid decrease the occurrence and severity of vision disorders and loss like cataract due to exposure to UV light for long periods of time. Ground Nut is one of the vegetables that keep the glucose level under control in addition to monitoring the level of vascular complication. It is also a great remedy to malnutrition. Extract of water from the Bengal Gram is a good remedy for diabetic patients to achieve a desirable glucose level. Bitter Gourd is rich in iron, Vitamin C, B1 & B2 is good for undernourished patients as it develops a strong resistance to various infections. Garlic and onions also Continue reading >>

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

25 Diabetic Foods For Stable Blood Glucose And Overall Health

Sticking to a diet of diabetic foods is one natural way to help manage your condition and feel as good as possible all day long. If you’re tired of the cycle of eating foods that spike your blood sugar levels, this list will help you avoid those foods and crowd them out with better, more healthy choices. 1. Spinach and Kale Spinach and kale are very similar to each other in terms of how they’re handled by the body and the amount of nutrition they provide. Diabetics can enjoy as much of either one as they care for, and there really isn’t a huge advantage of one over the other. You’ll be getting both Vitamin A and Vitamin C from each, as well as potassium, magnesium, and iron. Baby spinach and baby kale are very much alike in terms of usability, each having their own taste which is their major difference. You can use spinach and kale interchangeably in green smoothie recipes, but kale gets the edge in the snack department because it’s so easy to make kale chips that taste great and won’t leave you filled with regret when you’re done snacking. Eating Nutrient Dense Foods If you’re looking for some of the most nutrient dense foods on the planet you can’t go wrong with spinach and kale. Once for once they provide more vitamins and minerals than just about any other food, including other vegetables and fruit. 2. Beans Beans are a great addition to most any meal because they’ll help to stabilize your blood sugar, rather than have a detrimental effect or no effect at all. Foods like this are important because they can help balance out other foods that aren’t necessarily diabetic-friendly, and they can reduce the amount of insulin needed to bring your levels back to normal. Beans are easy enough to add to a meal, and many recipes call for beans as part of t Continue reading >>

Is Yam Good For Diabetes

Is Yam Good For Diabetes

Basically, no yams are grown in the United States. What is referred to as yams in the United States is basically a type of sweet potato. Real yams originated from Africa and are sold. On the other hand, sweet potatoes were natively grown in South America with some of it being grown in the USA. Yams help maintain controlled blood sugar levels whereas sweet potatoes increase the blood sugar levels. Effects of sweet potatoes and yams on blood sugar levels Yams and sweet potatoes contain carbohydrates. After consuming these carbohydrates they are broken down into sugar that is then absorbed into the bloodstream with a potential to cause a post mean a spike in the blood sugar levels. Generally, this should not be a problem since the body should be in a position to produce insulin to counter this effect. There is a problem when your body cells are resistant to the effects of insulin resistance. A continued spike in the blood sugar levels can eventually lead to a heart attack and kidney problems. Rating on the glycemic index Glycemic index is a scale rated from 0-100 and is used to show how a certain food substance causes a rise in the blood sugar levels. Pure glucose is rated 100. Sweet potatoes have a glycemic index of 70 which is considered high. On the other hand, yams have a glycemic index of 54 which is relatively low. The carbs count Basically, if what you consider is the total carbohydrates in a meal as a diabetic, then you might get everything wrong. Sweet potatoes have 26.58 grams of carbohydrates whereas the same serving of yams has 41.22 grams of carbohydrates. Given that yams have a glycemic index of 54 and sweet potatoes a glycemic index of 70, it would be expected that yams will have a higher glycemic index but this is not the case. Yams have 5.8 grams of solubl Continue reading >>

Ask Dr. Gourmet

Ask Dr. Gourmet

Are sweet potatoes better than regular potatoes for those with pre-diabetes? Is it all right for a pre-diabetic to eat sweet potato? I heard that sweet potato is better than white potato. Dr. Gourmet Says... Most sweet potatoes sold in the U.S. are often called "yams" but in fact are not, although the USDA requires that the label of "yam" be accompanied by "sweet potato" (not very helpful, I know). The sweet potatoes (or yams) you are likely referring to are the orange-fleshed tubers that are most familiar to people served at holidays in sticky-sweet casseroles garnished with marshmallows. Regardless of the name, both yams and sweet potatoes are great for diabetics (although not covered in maple syrup, brown sugar, or marshmallows) and may be a little better than plain (russet, red, or Yukon Gold) potatoes because they are somewhat higher in fiber. This fits in well with the Mediterranean Diet, which recommends choosing ingredients that are higher in fiber and complex carbohydrates. You can find out more about a Mediterranean-style diet for diabetics in my article, "The Mediterranean Diet IS a Diabetic Diet!" Thanks for writing, Timothy S. Harlan MD, FACP Dr. Gourmet Continue reading >>

Vegetables That Diabetics Should Avoid

Vegetables That Diabetics Should Avoid

Once you are diagnosed with diabetes, you will have to be a picky eater for the rest of your life. That is why its prudent for all diabetics to know what they can and cannot eat. Most of us have this misconception that vegetables are always healthy and you can have them so matter what. However all vegetables cannot be eaten by diabetics. Even when it comes the vegetables, diabetics have to tread with caution. Most vegetables that are starch are a strict no-no for people who have diabetes. Starch vegetables are easy to recognise because they are sweet. For example, potato and yams are some of the most starchy vegetables of all. Moreover, most of the vegetables that grow under the earth often have a high glycemic index. They raise the blood sugar level quickly. Diabetics must avoid vegetables that have a high glycemic index. But some vegetables do not have a very high glycemic index in spite of being sweet. For example pumpkin is sweet but it still has a low glycemic index. Here are some vegetables that diabetics must strictly avoid or have in limited amounts. Potatoes are sweet, fattening and extremely starchy. That is why, you must avoid potatoes in any form as far as possible. Beans are not sweet but they are starchy. You need not stop having beans all together. But have only boiled or baked beans and in limited portions. Continue reading >>

Jamaican Yam - Simply Nutritious And Delicious!

Jamaican Yam - Simply Nutritious And Delicious!

1 2 By Marsha N. Woolery, Healthy Eating & Diet Yam, a starchy root, is a favourite food in most Jamaican homes and even for those in the diaspora who are willing to pay a big price for a taste of this simple yet delicious food item. There are different varieties of yam, and they all have a unique taste, flavour and texture. Some are dry, some waxy, some soft, and the sweet yam- mmmmmm (mainly available a little before and after the Christmas season) - is even softer. Might I add that the latter is my favourite; soft and so delicious when mashed with ... - I will not disclose - it is a heavenly experience. In the Caribbean, yam is in the staples food group because the main nutrient provided is carbohydrates. Yam provides the body with: fibre, starch and sugar potassium protein vitamins B1 (thiamin), B2 (riboflavin), B3 (niacin), B6 (pyridoxine), folic acid, and pantothenic acid. These vitamins help us to get energy from carbohydrates and fat. Yam is referred to as a complex carbohydrates food source because, in addition to the starch and sugar that provide energy, yam has soluble and insoluble fibre. Four ounces of cooked yam provides 80 to 100 kilocalories and four grams of fibre. There is more soluble fibre present in yam than insoluble, which makes it easy to digest and is a suitable food for young children. The fibre in yam: Slows the release of sugar or glucose from the blood into the cells. For this reason, persons with diabetes should consume yam to achieve better blood sugar control. Increases satiety or makes the person feel full for a longer period of time. Yam is a recommended food for persons who are trying to lose or maintain weight because they will feel hungry less often. Reduces the risk of being constipated (hard bound), because fibre increases bulk in Continue reading >>

6 Mealtime Tips To Cut Out Diabetes In Dogs

6 Mealtime Tips To Cut Out Diabetes In Dogs

The American Diabetes Association has designated November American Diabetes Month. One in every 400 dogs has this disorder, which prevents the body from regulating its blood sugar (glucose) levels. According to Blue Pearl Veterinary, signs and symptoms of diabetes include: Increase in water consumption, increase in urination, increase in appetite, weight loss, and, if the animal has had diabetes for some time, cataracts. “If you notice any of these symptoms, we highly recommend seeing your family veterinarian as soon as possible,” says Neil Shaw, Blue Pearl’s chief medical officer. Meanwhile, if your dog is young, healthy, and not exhibiting any of the symptoms Dr. Shaw cites, you can make sure you never get the diabetes diagnosis with some simple nutritional guidelines. Here are six simple steps we can all take to prevent diabetes in dogs. 1. Feed a diabetes-preventive diet with a low-glycemic index That means a grain-free formula, specifically one that does not contain rice, a very high-glycemic grain. Eating high-glycemic index food, humans and dogs alike feel hungry again shortly after eating, which makes us want to eat more than we should. Over time, high glucose levels and excessive insulin secretion impair the pancreas’ ability to secrete insulin — and that’s diabetes. But when we eat low-glycemic food and snacks, we experience lower but more sustained increases in blood sugar after eating, which puts less strain on the pancreas. Feeling less full, Spot won’t be hungry shortly after a meal, and he’ll have higher endurance, improved blood cholesterol levels, and a reduced risk of cardiovascular and gallbladder disease. 2. Measure your mutt’s meal portions, and don’t leave food out for Spot to graze As dogs help themselves to more than their hea Continue reading >>

46 Chefs Share Healthy Cooking Tips For People With Diabetes

46 Chefs Share Healthy Cooking Tips For People With Diabetes

People with diabetes should cook their meats by baking, grilling, or broiling them for the most part. An occasional fried food should be balanced with a low carbohydrate option, such as a salad or other cooked vegetables. Meals should be well balanced, and include foods from all food groups. They also often have a “dyslipidemia.” In other words, the “bad” cholesterol, or LDL cholesterol is high, and the “good” cholesterol, or HDL cholesterol is low. Therefore, they should choose their fats wisely, and pick fats that are liquid at room temperature. These healthier oils include olive oil, safflower oil, peanut oil, sunflower oil, and canola oil, among others. The idea is to increase the good cholesterol in your bloodstream, so that it takes the bad cholesterol out via your liver. Use olive oil or canola oil cooking spray instead of butter. People with diabetes should cook their vegetables ahead for the week if they have a busy schedule. That way, they will always have some vegetables that they like on hand to fill out their meal. They can also cook their meat or protein portions ahead. It’s best to be prepared, and have some of the foods you love already prepared on hand. That way, you don’t get tempted to go off your plan. When you make recipes, use low fat dairy products, as opposed to higher fat dairy products. Pick nonfat or 1 percent milk instead of 2 percent or whole milk, for example. Generally cook with less fat in your meals overall. Limit your fat servings to 1 per meal or a fat that is considered a healthier fat such as olive oil. Brush it on sweet potatoes, or whole wheat bread, along with some roasted garlic. When you pick your carbohydrate servings, pick whole grain products. Cook brown rice, or try whole wheat pasta. Cook pastas and rice a l Continue reading >>

Candied Yams From American Diabetes Association

Candied Yams From American Diabetes Association

Introduction Ingredients 4 medium yams 1/4 cup packed dark brown sugar 1 tsp cinnamon 1/2 tsp ground cloves 1 Granny Smith apple, peeled and thinly sliced 3/4 cup apple cider 2 Tbs margarine, cut into pea-size pieces Directions Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Spray an 8x8 inch baking dish with nonstick cooking spray. Place yams on a baking sheet and bake until the skin feels soft to the touch, about 60 minutes. Cool, peel, and slice into 1/8 inch rounds. In a small bowl, whisk the sugar, cinnamon, and cloves. Place half of the yams in the baking dish, then the apple slices, then half of the sugar mixture. Top with the remaining yams and sugar mixture. Pour the cider around the edges of the baking dish. Evenly scatter the margarine pieces on top. Bake covered, until bubbly and the yams are tender, about 40 minutes. Number of Servings: 8 Recipe submitted by SparkPeople user CHEFSOPHIE. Continue reading >>

Antidiabetic Effects Of Yam (dioscorea Batatas) And Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, In A Rat Model Of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes

Antidiabetic Effects Of Yam (dioscorea Batatas) And Its Active Constituent, Allantoin, In A Rat Model Of Streptozotocin-induced Diabetes

Go to: The objective of this study was to investigate the therapeutic efficacies of crude yam (Dioscorea batatas) powder (PY), water extract of yam (EY), and allantoin (the active constituent of yam) in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic rats with respect to glucose, insulin, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1), C-peptide, glycated hemoglobin (HbAlc), lipid metabolism, and oxidative stress. For this purpose, 50 rats were divided into five groups: normal control (NC), diabetic control (STZ), and STZ plus treatment groups (STZ + PY, STZ + EY, and STZ + allantoin). After treatment for one-month, there was a decrease in blood glucose: 385 ± 7 in STZ, 231 ± 3 in STZ + PY, 214 ± 11 in STZ + EY, and 243 ± 6 mg/dL in STZ + allantoin, respectively. There were significant statistical differences (p < 0.001) compared to STZ (100%): 60% in STZ + PY, 55% in STZ + EY, and 63% in STZ + allantoin. With groups in the same order, there were significant decreases (p < 0.001) in HbAlc (100% as 24.4 ± 0.6 ng/mL, 78%, 75%, and 77%), total cholesterol (100% as 122 ± 3 mg/dL, 70%, 67%, and 69%), and low-density lipoprotein (100% as 29 ± 1 mg/dL, 45%, 48%, and 38%). There were also significant increases (p < 0.001) in insulin (100% as 0.22 ± 0.00 ng/mL, 173%, 209%, and 177%), GLP-1 (100% as 18.4 ± 0.7 pmol/mL, 160%, 166%, and 162%), and C-peptide (100% as 2.56 ± 0.10 ng/mL, 129%, 132%, and 130%). The treatment effectively ameliorated antioxidant stress as shown by a significant decrease (p < 0.001) in malondialdehyde (100% as 7.25 ± 0.11 nmol/mL, 87%, 86%, and 85%) together with increases (p < 0.01) in superoxide dismutase (100% as 167 ± 6 IU/mL, 147%, 159%, and 145%) and reduced glutathione (100% as 167 ± 6 nmol/mL, 123%, 141%, and 140%). The results indicate that yam and allantoin Continue reading >>

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

Have Gestational Diabetes? Here’s How You Should Eat

While most women need to be careful about their diets, others have to be especially careful not to develop gestational diabetes. I’m on the crusade to fight diabetes in all of us, but I’m especially concerned about women with gestational diabetes because their babies are automatically at risk for developing diabetes related issues down the line. And we don’t want that! So let’s discuss a plan to keep moms as healthy as possible during this magical time known as pregnancy. How Did I Get Gestational Diabetes? Insulin is the hormone responsible for getting sugar out of the blood and inside the cells. Our bodies can typically regulate the amount of insulin it needs to produce to get sugar out of the bloodstream and into the cells. But during gestational diabetes, the hormones in the placenta that help the baby develop properly also block insulin from working in mommy’s body – causing insulin resistance. So instead of getting moved into the cells, all this sugar becomes stuck outside the cells, creating high blood sugar levels, or hyperglycemia. How Does Gestational Diabetes Affect Babies? Diabetic women who become pregnant are at higher risk of developing birth defects. But since gestational diabetes only affects the baby after it’s been formed, but is still growing, the risk becomes macrosomia, or “fat” baby. During gestational diabetes, mom’s pancreas has to work harder to produce more insulin to get rid of all the sugar in the blood that the cells are not absorbing. The placenta doesn’t absorb insulin, but it does let sugar pass through. This extra sugar goes right to the baby. When the baby develops high blood sugar levels, the baby’s pancreas starts to produce additional insulin to eliminate all the extra sugar in the blood, just like mom’s do Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Better Than White Potatoes?

Are Sweet Potatoes Better Than White Potatoes?

Q: How do sweet potatoes affect diabetes? Are they a good substitute for white potatoes? A: The same amount of white potatoes and sweet potatoes contain about the same amount of carbohydrates (1/2 cup = 15 grams of carbs). Sweet potatoes, however, have more fiber and are slightly lower on the glycemic index than white potatoes. For this reason, blood glucose will rise a little more gradually with sweet potatoes than with white potatoes. As far as nutrients go, sweet potatoes are a rich source of vitamin A and beta-carotene. As with all foods containing carbohydrates, keep in mind the importance of portion size and distribution throughout the day. Virginia Zamudio Lange, a member of Diabetic Living's editorial advisory board, is a founding partner of Alamo Diabetes Team, LLP in San Antonio. Continue reading >>

Japanese Sweet Potato May Cure Diabetes Along With Coffee And Ginkgo

Japanese Sweet Potato May Cure Diabetes Along With Coffee And Ginkgo

(NewsTarget) A white sweet potato extract from the Ipomoea batatas plant may cure diabetes, adding to other recent research showing blood sugar reducing benefits from coffee, the gingko tree, and nuts. Diabetes is at epidemic proportions but traditional medicine has used plants to treat this condition worldwide. Sweet Potato Diabetes Research Researchers are now studying the Ipomoea batatas plant, a traditional sweet potato remedy from the mountains of Japan. The white sweet potato has been used for centuries in Japan to treat high blood pressure, anemia and diabetes. The raw potatoes come from the Kagawa region of Japan, a mountainous region between Osaka and Hiroshima. Recent research with the sweet potato extract has shown promise in stabilizing blood sugar in type 2 diabetes. A study in Austria and Italy enlisted 60 participants who consumed 4 g of an extract of the white sweet potato, called caiapo. After three months, many reported reduced blood sugar of 15 points. When participants consumed 2 grams of the extract, their results were not curative, but those on the 4 gram a day diet showed at least a 13 percent reduction in fasting blood sugar, as well as a 30 percent drop in cholesterol and a 13 percent drop in LDL cholesterol. The caiapo extract seems to have an effect by decreasing insulin resistance; however, further tests are needed to confirm these findings. Sweet potatoes join the ranks of other foods thought to help reduce insulin resistance and prevent the onset of diabetes, such as coffee and nuts. Coffee Reduces Risk of Diabetes The coffee research showed that one cup of coffee reduced diabetes risk by seven percent. These findings, published in the Archives of Internal Medicine, collected data from numerous studies that totaled over a half million parti Continue reading >>

Diabetes-friendly Recipe: Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Toasted Pecans

Diabetes-friendly Recipe: Mashed Sweet Potatoes With Toasted Pecans

This low-sugar variant of a Thanksgiving favorite adds a sweet note to any holiday table. Prep Time: 10 minutes Cooking Time: 30 minutes Servings: 6 Serving Size: about 1/3 cup Ingredients 3 large sweet potatoes (or yams) 4 tablespoons toasted pecans 1 tablespoon brown sugar 1 pinch ground cinnamon Instructions 1. Peel the sweet potatoes and cut them in half. Place them in a pot and cover with cold water. Bring to a boil over high heat and simmer until the potatoes are tender when pricked with a fork, about 30 minutes depending on the size of the potatoes. Drain. 2. Meanwhile, toast the pecans in a nonstick skillet for 2-4 minutes or in a toaster oven and set aside. 3. Mash the potatoes and brown sugar with a potato masher or fork, or use a food mill. 4. Adjust the cinnamon to taste. 5. Transfer to a serving dish and top with the toasted pecans. Nutrition Facts (Per Serving) Exchanges: Starch 2 • Fat ½ Calories: 172 Calories from Fat: 34 Total Fat: 4g Saturated Fat: 0.4g Cholesterol: 0mg Sodium: 17mg Total Carbohydrate: 33g Dietary Fiber: 3g Sugars: 10g Protein: 2g Copyright 2007: American Diabetes Association From "Diabetes Fit Food" Reprinted with permission from The American Diabetes Association. To order this book, please call 1-800-232-6733 or order online at Continue reading >>

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Top 10 Foods For Diabetes And Pregnancy

Guest post by Regina M. Shirley RD, LDN of Serving Up Diabetes There are a lot of food lists out there: Top 10 Superfoods for Health, Top 10 Foods to fight Cancer, and many more. As someone with diabetes, there are also a lot of lists we can abide by: the low glycemic index list of foods, foods under 100 calories, low-carb foods, etc. Go ask any dietitian, and we will tell you to eat a balanced diet that contains a food item from each food group at most every meal, with healthy snacks in between. This is a general guideline, and most Americans don’t have enough hours in the day to incorporate all the right food groups into their daily eating plan. I used to be one of those, call me a bit of a hypocrite, but as much as I tell people that breakfast is the most important meal of the day, I was just a coffee girl in the morning, maybe with an English muffin thrown in there or a healthy nut bar. While planning for my pregnancy, I decided I needed to revamp my diet a bit to make sure that I would give my baby the best chance at developing strong organs in the first trimester. I did a lot of reading, and implemented what I already knew as well, and created my own “Top 10” list for baby and me. Here is a list of foods that I have incorporated in my diet that pack the most vitamins and nutrients (folic acid, iron and calcium are of most importance), and are even low on the glycemic index list (helpful for the blood sugars) so are also idea for people with diabetes in general. Eggs – 1-2 eggs per day in the form of hard boiled, scrambled, or in an egg and cheese whole-grain sandwich that I made myself. I buy the cage-free farm fresh eggs from my local farm. Many people think that whole eggs are bad for you because of the cholesterol in the yolk, and that egg whites are al Continue reading >>

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