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Are Type 1 Diabetics More Prone To Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

Diabetes And Cancer: What's The Connection?

When Michelle Hall was diagnosed with breast cancer two years ago, she was shocked. "The standing joke in the family was that I came from a long line of stocky French women who lived forever," says Hall, 62, of Salem, N.H. "We had no breast cancer in the family." Hall had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in 2001, so she would have special challenges while facing down cancer. As diseases, cancer and diabetes seem a world away from each other. Yet, numerous studies suggest the conditions are linked. People with diabetes are more likely to be diagnosed with cancer than those without diabetes, but why remains unclear. Scientists are still trying to answer even the most basic questions: Does diabetes cause cancer? If so, what kinds of cancer and how? As the interplay between diabetes and cancer becomes clearer, researchers hope to gain an edge against both diseases. The link between diabetes and cancer may be partially explained by risk factors that underlie and raise the risk of both diseases. Sex: Overall, men are more likely to develop both cancer and type 2 diabetes than women. Weight: Overweight and obese people are more likely to develop cancer than lean people. The association between type 2 diabetes and weight is also well established. While it's clear that losing weight reduces the risk for type 2 diabetes, less is known about whether weight loss combats cancer. Diet: Eating patterns that are thought to help prevent and treat type 2 diabeteslimited red and processed meats and abundant vegetables, fruits, and whole grainsare also associated with a lower risk for many types of cancer. Exercise: Studies show that regular physical activity lowers the risk of developing several types of cancer. Likewise, 30 minutes of moderate-intensity exercise per day can reduce th Continue reading >>

Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes Could Be A Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

"Experts have revealed the onset of diabetes, or existing diabetes getting much worse could be a sign of hidden pancreatic cancer," reports The Daily Express. The media reports follow a press release of a study presented at the European Cancer Congress (ECCO) yesterday. The research analysed nearly a million people with type 2 diabetes in Belgium and Italy, some of whom went on to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. The recent onset of diabetes appeared to be a possible warning sign of pancreatic cancer, with 25% of cases in Belgium and 18% in Italy being diagnosed within three months of a diabetes diagnosis. Faster progression of diabetes (where patients needed insulin or other more intensive treatments sooner) was also associated with a greater chance of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is rare and often has a poor outcome, partly because it is difficult to detect at an early stage. However, it's important to put these findings in context. Diabetes has previously been linked with pancreatic cancer, though it is unclear why. It could be that diabetes increases the risk of pancreatic cancer. What is probably more likely is that rapid onset or progression of diabetes could be a symptom of the cancer itself. Diabetes is fairly common in the UK, with around 4 million cases, while pancreatic cancer remains very rare. Just because you have diabetes does not mean you will go on to get pancreatic cancer. However, if you are concerned that you may have diabetes or that your diabetes is poorly controlled, you should talk to your GP. There are also steps you can take to reduce your risk of developing diabetes. Where did the story come from? The study was carried out by researchers from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France. The Continue reading >>

Co-morbidity Between Early-onset Leukemia And Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive Of A Shared Viral Etiology?

Co-morbidity Between Early-onset Leukemia And Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive Of A Shared Viral Etiology?

Co-Morbidity between Early-Onset Leukemia and Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive of a Shared Viral Etiology? We are experimenting with display styles that make it easier to read articles in PMC. The ePub format uses eBook readers, which have several "ease of reading" features already built in. The ePub format is best viewed in the iBooks reader. You may notice problems with the display of certain parts of an article in other eReaders. Generating an ePub file may take a long time, please be patient. Co-Morbidity between Early-Onset Leukemia and Type 1 Diabetes Suggestive of a Shared Viral Etiology? Kari Hemminki, Richard Houlston, [...], and Xiaochen Shu Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML) are common early-onset malignancies. Their causes are largely unknown but infectious etiology has been implicated. Type 1 diabetes (T1D) is an autoimmune disease for which infectious triggers of disease onset have been sought and increasing pointing to enteroviruses. Based on our previous results on co-morbidity between leukemia and T1D, we updated the Swedish dataset and focused on early onset leukemias in patients who had been hospitalized for T1D, comparing to those not hospitalized for T1D. Standardized incidence ratios (SIRs) were calculated for leukemia in 24,052 patients hospitalized for T1D covering years 1964 through 2008. T1D patients were included if hospitalized before age 21 years. Practically all Swedish children and adolescents with T1D are hospitalized at the start of insulin treatment. SIR for ALL was 8.30 (N = 18, 95% confidence interval 4.9113.14) when diagnosed at age 10 to 20 years after hospitalization for T1D and it was 3.51 (13, 1.866.02) before hospitalization for T1D. The SIR for ALL was 19.85 (N = 33, 13.7427.76) and that for AML was Continue reading >>

Cancer Incidence In Persons With Type 1 Diabetes: A Five-country Study Of 9,000 Cancers In Type 1 Diabetic Individuals

Cancer Incidence In Persons With Type 1 Diabetes: A Five-country Study Of 9,000 Cancers In Type 1 Diabetic Individuals

Cancer incidence in persons with type 1 diabetes: a five-country study of 9,000 cancers in type 1 diabetic individuals Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG Scotland UK Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG Scotland UK Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences & Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Teviot Place, Edinburgh, EH8 9AG Scotland UK Institute of Cancer Epidemiology, Danish Cancer Society, Copenhagen, Denmark Centre for Research Methods, Department of Social Research, University of Helsinki, Helsinki, Finland Division of Health and Social Services, National Institute for Health and Welfare, Helsinki, Finland Department of Medicine, Sahlgrenska University Hospital, University of Gothenburg, Gothenburg, Sweden Institute of Environmental Medicine, Karolinska Institutet, Stockholm, Sweden Information Services, NHS National Services Scotland, Edinburgh, Scotland UK Department of Clinical Diabetes and Epidemiology, Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute, Melbourne, Australia Stephanie H Read, Email: [email protected] . Received 2015 Nov 4; Accepted 2016 Jan 12. Open Access This article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. An excess cancer incidence of 2025% has been identified among persons with diabetes, most of whom have type 2 diabetes. We aimed to Continue reading >>

New Study Hints Cancer Risk Increased In Type 1 Diabetes

New Study Hints Cancer Risk Increased In Type 1 Diabetes

New Study Hints Cancer Risk Increased in Type 1 Diabetes Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of a range of nonsex-specific cancers, in particular soon after the diabetes diagnosis, the results of a new multicountry registry study indicate. Looking at over 9000 incident cancers across almost four million person-years in individuals with type 1 diabetes, the researchers found that rates of stomach, liver, pancreatic, and kidney cancer were increased in both men and women compared with the general population. The cancer risk was more than doubled in men and women during the first year after diabetes diagnosis. However, the risk fell back to population levels during subsequent years, an effect that may be due to increased scrutiny of newly diagnosed diabetes patients. Lead author Bendix Carstensen, MSc, Steno Diabetes Center, Gentofte, Denmark, told Medscape Medical News: "From a population perspective, I think the major conclusion is that the excess risk of cancer among persons with type 1 diabetes is not a major worry. "It turns out that the types of cancer that are elevated among type 1 diabetes patients are pretty much the same as those that are elevated among type 2 diabetes patients, and the elevation among type 1 diabetes patients is somewhat smaller than the elevation found among type 2 diabetes patients." A previous study reported by Medscape Medical News, involving approaching one million Australian diabetes patients, indicated that both type 1 and type 2 diabetes patients had increased risks of developing cancer, although the risk was higher with type 2 diabetes. Mr Carstensen emphasized that it was possible to conduct the current study, which was published online in Diabetologia on February 29, only because the countries involved maintain regis Continue reading >>

Cancer Rates Higher In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Cancer Rates Higher In Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

diabetes, a new Australian study shows. The researchers say that close follow-up, given right after a diabetes diagnosis, might partly explain the increased cancer risk seen. But these factors "do not explain increased risks 2 years following diabetes diagnosis, particularly for cancers of the pancreas, liver, kidney, and endometrium." Based on the findings, the researchers say, people with diabetes should get screened for cancer, which could help doctors treat cases early and lessen premature deaths due to cancer. The research is published online in the journal Diabetes Care. The study included 953,382 registrants from the National Diabetes Service Scheme (NDSS) in Australia: 80,676 with type 1 diabetes and 872,706 with type 2 diabetes, diagnosed between the years 1997 and 2008. The NDSS is one of the world's largest diabetes registries, and the data were linked to Australia’s National Death Index. This information was then linked to data from the Australian Cancer Database. Cancer rates in Australia's general population served as a comparison. Lead researcher Jessica Harding, of the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne, says that with the aging population and increasing obesity, the number of new cases of cancer and diabetes are on the rise. Given that these increases are happening over the same time periods, she and her colleagues figured there must be a link between the two. The highest excess risks the researchers saw were for cancers of the pancreas, liver, endometrium, kidney, thyroid, and gallbladder, and for a cancer that affects blood cells and bone marrow called chronic myeloid leukemia. Also, she says, "given that insulin…may promote the growth of cancer cells, we wanted to explore whether type 1 patients -- treated with insulin -- had a h Continue reading >>

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What Is The Relationship Between Breast Cancer And Diabetes?

What is the relationship between breast cancer and diabetes? Survivors of breast cancer, who are post-menopausal, have a higher chance of developing diabetes. Scientists are becoming increasingly aware of an association between diabetes and cancer. In this article, we discuss the link. A study, published in Diabetologia, is the largest to observe the link between surviving breast cancer and eventually developing diabetes; it also showed that whether the patient went on to develop diabetes was closely associated with having undergone chemotherapy . The opposite interaction has also been observed: females with diabetes have a 20 percent chance of developing postmenopausal breast cancer. A study from last year demonstrated that people with diabetes over the age of 60 are more likely to develop breast cancer, compared with their counterparts without diabetes. Fast facts on breast cancer and diabetes: It has been observed that having diabetes increases the likelihood of breast cancer, and that having breast cancer increases the likelihood of developing diabetes. Lifestyle changes can help reduce risk long-term. How has the connection between breast cancer and diabetes been established? There has been increased study into the correlation of breast cancer and diabetes. The connection has been made as a result of improvements in diagnosis and treatment of breast cancer. As more women survive breast cancer, it is becoming increasingly important to understand the long-term outcomes for survivors as they grow older. However, few studies have tried to determine what the risk of developing diabetes is for a breast cancer survivor. The study in Diabetalogia is an example of the new research that has established the connection between breast cancer and diabetes more firmly. The team, Continue reading >>

Other Diseases That Are More Common In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Other Diseases That Are More Common In People With Type 1 Diabetes

Other Diseases That Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes KidsHealth / For Teens / Other Diseases That Are More Common in People With Type 1 Diabetes People with type 1 diabetes have a greater risk for other health problems. Like type 1 diabetes, these are often autoimmune disorders. Most teens with type 1 diabetes never need treatment for any other autoimmune disorder. But some do. So it can help to find out more about the diseases that can happen to people with type 1 diabetes. In autoimmune disorders, a person's immune system  attacks the body's healthy tissues as though they were foreign invaders. If the attack is severe enough, it can affect how well that body part works. For example, type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that affects the pancreas. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas can't make insulin because the immune system attacks the pancreas and destroys the cells that make insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are also more likely to have other autoimmune problems. Doctors aren't exactly sure why autoimmune diseases happen, but a person's genes probably play a role. While other autoimmune disorders are linked to diabetes, they are not actually caused by the diabetes — they're just more likely to happen. Autoimmune diseases that people with type 1 diabetes are more likely to get include: Sometimes people develop one or more of these problems before they develop type 1 diabetes. And sometimes doctors discover these other autoimmune diseases around the same time they find out that a person has type 1 diabetes. In other people, the disorder may not develop until months or years after they've been diagnosed with type 1 diabetes. The thyroid is a gland that makes hormones that help control metabolism and growth. These hormones play a role in bone deve Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer: American Diabetes Association

Diabetes And Cancer: American Diabetes Association

Researchers are trying to learn more about the link between type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Type 2 diabetes and certain cancers share some risk factors: Age As you get older, your risk for both type 2 diabetes and cancer goes up. Gender Overall, cancer occurs more often in men. Men also have a slightly higher risk of diabetes than women. Race/ethnicity African Americans and non-Hispanic whites are more likely to develop cancer. African Americans, Native Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, and Asian Americans/Pacific Islanders are at higher risk for developing type 2 diabetes. Overweight Being overweight can increase your risk of type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Inactivity Higher physical activity levels lower the risk of type 2 diabetes and certain types of cancer. Smoking Smoking is linked to several types of cancer. Studies suggest that smoking is a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Alcohol Drinking more than one drink a day for women or two drinks a day for men raises the risk for both diabetes and cancer. Lose weight If you are overweight, even losing 7% of your weight (15 pounds if you weigh 200 pounds) can make a big difference. Use the Body Mass Index (BMI) Calculator to find out how much weight you need to lose. Eat healthy Choose a diet with plenty of: Fresh vegetables The best choices are fresh, frozen, and canned vegetables and vegetable juices without added sodium, fat, or sugar. For good health, try to eat at least 3-5 daily servings of vegetables, including asparagus, broccoli, cabbage, carrots, cauliflower, celery, eggplant, greens, peppers, snap peas and tomatoes. A serving of vegetables is cup of cooked vegetables or vegetable juice; or 1 cup of raw vegetables. Whole grains A whole grain is the entire grain, which includes Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cancer

Diabetes And Cancer

Tweet Studies have shown that diabetes carries an increased risk for a number of different forms of cancer. Having cancer with diabetes can make achieving good diabetes control much more difficult but this can be relieved to some extent. How is type 2 diabetes linked with cancer? One theory for why a link may exist is that high levels of circulating insulin (known as hyperinsulinemia) can promote the growth of tumours. In type 2 diabetes, insulin resistance commonly causes the body to produce more insulin than normal. Another reason why a link may be present is where a harmful lifestyle may lead to obesity and therefore higher risks of both type 2 diabetes and cancer. Cancer and type 2 diabetes The risks of contracting the following cancers are shown to be doubled by the presence of type 2 diabetes: Pancreatic cancer Endometrial cancer (also known as womb cancer) A smaller increased risk, of 20% to 50% is seen for the following forms of cancer. Colorectal cancer Bladder cancer Blood cancers (non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma) The one positive is that incidences of prostate cancer are actually lower for people with type 2 diabetes. Cancer and type 1 diabetes Links between type 1 diabetes and cancer are not so well recorded but it appears there is also an increase in risk of cancers for people with type 1 diabetes. The cancers with the highest increase in risk tended to be different to those noted in type 2 diabetes. The cancers with increased risk in type 1 diabetes include: Stomach cancer Cervical cancer What are the symptoms of cancer? The symptoms of cancer vary widely depending on which part of the body the cancer strikes. What treatment options are open for cancer? The main treatment options for cancer are surgery to remove the cancers or radiotherapy (also known as radiatio Continue reading >>

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer

Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Mysterious Link Connects Diabetes And Cancer Most people wouldn't think diabetes and cancer have anything to do with each other. But a group of experts from the American Cancer Society and the American Diabetes Association thinks they do. A consensus statement from that panel says there's accumulating evidence that people with diabetes are, in fact, more prone to certain cancers. The analysis is published in the latest CA: A Cancer Journal for Clinicians. It turns out that diabetics are twice as likely to get cancer of the liver, pancreas and uterine lining. Their risk of colon, breast and bladder cancer is 20 to 50 percent higher than non-diabetics'. There doesn't seem to be any higher risk for others, such as lung cancer. And the risk of prostate cancer is actually lower among diabetics. Doctors have noticed since the 1950s that their diabetic patients seem to get cancer more often than usual. But it wasn't until last year that researchers pulled together data from various studies and found an association. Also last year, several epidemiology studies got a lot of attention when they suggested that a synthetic long-acting insulin called glargine seems to increase the risk of cancer. But that's still highly debatable. Other studies indicate that metformin , the most common drug for Type 2 diabetes, may actually reduce the risk of getting cancer or dying from it. And just how might diabetes increase the risk of cancer? On that point there's only speculation. Here are some possibilities: Shared risk factors: Both cancer and diabetes become more common as people age; gain weight; eat diets poor in fruits, vegetables and whole-grain cereals; or smoke. Men have higher risk of both diabetes and cancer. Off-kilter metabolism: Many Continue reading >>

Sugar The Reason Diabetics Have A Higher Risk Of Aggressive Cancers

Sugar The Reason Diabetics Have A Higher Risk Of Aggressive Cancers

Sugar the Reason Diabetics Have a Higher Risk of Aggressive Cancers New research offers the answer to a mystery that has perplexed scientists for decades: How do cancerous tumors in diabetics and others with metabolic problems like obesity grow even when their cells are starving for energy? A study published by doctors at the Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai Medical Center in New York City shows that when dietary sugar combines with cancer genes all of a sudden you have a tumor that is a sink, Dr. Ross Cagan, lead author of the study, told Healthline. What's more, Cagan has found a way to combat the problem, at least in fruit flies. The report, published last week in the journal Cell , outlines Cagan's findings. Most importantly, it shows that even though a cancer cell's insulin pathways don't work in diabetics, cancerous tumors get around that roadblock and trigger the insulin receptors regardless. As a result, cancerous tumors metastasize and spread to other parts of the body. Cagan, a professor of developmental and regenerative biology, explained that Ras and Src, classic human cancer genes, can act similarly in fruit flies. When dietary sugar combines with these genes, it activates a pathway that allows the cells to take in sugar. Tumors love sugar, Cagan said. It helps them grow. The diabetes-cancer link is most often found in people with cancers of the pancreas, breast, liver, or colon, Cagan said. In what could be a monumental discovery if proven true in humans, Cagan found that medicating the flies with arcabose, AD81, and pyrvinium reduced tumor size and progression. Importantly, we showed that any of these drugsalonewas not effective, but the cocktailworked nicely to dramatically reduce the tumor and extend the fly's lifespan, he said. Arcabose is appr Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Increased Risk Of Some Types Of Cancer

Type 1 Diabetes Linked To Increased Risk Of Some Types Of Cancer

Type 1 Diabetes Linked to Increased Risk of Some Types of Cancer Commentary by Stephanie H. Read, MD and Derek LeRoith MD, PhD Type 1 diabetes is associated with an increased risk of some cancer types, including cancer of the stomach, liver, pancreas, endometrium, ovary and kidney, but a reduced risk of other cancer types, including prostate and breast cancer, according to a multicenter study of data from five countries published online ahead of print in Diabetologia. We found that the risk of some cancers in people with type 1 diabetes is similar to the risk observed in people with type 2 diabetes in earlier studies, said lead author Stephanie H. Read, MD, Research Assistant at the Usher Institute of Population Health Sciences and Informatics, University of Edinburgh, Scotland. This suggests that there may be a similar mechanism leading to the increased risk of some cancers in people with type 1 or type 2 diabetes, such as high blood sugar levels or possibly obesity. Our findings also suggest that long-term insulin treatment does not markedly increase cancer risk. Based on our findings, we do not recommend any changes to current clinical practice, Dr. Read said. Lifestyle approaches to mitigate cancer risk, including avoiding smoking, maintaining a healthy weight, and increasing physical activity, apply to people with type 1 diabetes as they do the general population. Healthcare providers should encourage their patients to adopt and maintain healthy lifestyles and to partake in cancer screening programs as recommended for the general population. The study analyzed more than 9,000 cancer cases in people with type 1 diabetes using data from five nationwide diabetes registers: Australia (2000-2008), Denmark (1995-2014), Finland (1972-2012), Scotland (1995-2012) and Swede Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Raised Risk Of Certain Cancers

Type 1 Diabetes And Raised Risk Of Certain Cancers

Type 1 Diabetes and Raised Risk of Certain Cancers Study suggests, but doesn't prove, that odds increase for some types of tumors, but drop for others TUESDAY, March 1, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Having type 1 diabetes may raise the risk of some cancers, but lower the risk of others, a new study suggests. A higher risk was seen for cancers of the stomach, liver, pancreas, endometrium, ovary and kidneys. But a reduced risk was seen for prostate and breast cancers, researchers reported. In type 1 diabetes , the body cannot produce the hormone insulin , which helps regulate blood sugar levels . People with type 1 diabetes must be treated with insulin to survive. The good news from this study, said researcher Sarah Wild, is that it doesn't seem that insulin treatment is responsible for an increased risk of some cancers, which has been a concern. "This pattern of cancer risk [seen in the study] is similar to that seen for people with type 2 diabetes and people who are overweight ," said Wild, a professor of epidemiology at the University of Edinburgh in the United Kingdom. "This suggests that insulin treatment for type 1 diabetes does not itself increase risk of cancer ." And, Wild pointed out, the new findings only show an association between type 1 diabetes and an increased risk for cancer , not that type 1 diabetes is a direct cause of the increased risk. Another diabetes expert said it's not clear if there is a cause-and-effect relationship between type 1 diabetes and cancer risk. "We need to take their [the authors of the new study] findings with caution," said Dr. Joel Zonszein, director of the Clinical Diabetes Center at Montefiore Medical Center in New York City. "Patients with diabetes have enough problems, and they don't need cancer on top of their complications." H Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

Diabetes And Colon Cancer: An Emerging Link

More than 25 million adults aged 20 and older in the United States have diabetes. That figure has more than tripled since 1980. That is bad news for a number of reasons. Not only can diabetes cause heart disease, stroke, nerve damage, and eye issues, but recent research now shows there is also a clear link between type 2 diabetes and colon cancer. Colon cancer is one of the most preventable types of cancer, yet it is still the third most common cancer among both men and women in the U.S. And, many of the ways people can lower their risk for colon cancer are actually the same as how they can avoid developing type 2 diabetes. These include: Staying away from a diet high in red and processed meats Keeping physically active Maintaining a healthy weight Staying away from tobacco Avoiding heavy alcohol use Even though the two diseases share several common risk factors, research shows that type 2 diabetes itself is indeed linked to increased risk of developing colon cancer. Studies also show that among patients diagnosed with colorectal cancer, those with diabetes were more likely than those without it to die – even after controlling for other factors such as disease stage, body weight, and smoking habits. There are a few major hypotheses for the link, according to Peter Campbell, Ph.D., an American Cancer Society researcher who has been studying the connection between diabetes and colon cancer for a number of years. One idea has to do with a condition that causes the amount of insulin in a person’s blood to be higher than normal, called hyperinsulinemia. Insulin is the body’s way of regulating the amount of sugar – or glucose – in the blood. Hyperinsulinemia can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes. The thought, says Campbell, is that the abnormally high level Continue reading >>

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