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Are Sweeteners Good For Diabetics?

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Best Sweetener For Diabetics

Sugar, sugar, sugar…sweet, sweet, sweet…it's just human nature to love it. In fact believe it or not even studies show young babies and infants have a preference for sweet tastes. So how can we help it, right? But when it comes to having sweets I'm not a sugar advocate at all. So I wanted to write up some info on the best sweetener for diabetics, and point you in the right direction so you can manage your blood sugar and still enjoy your sweets Why cut out sugar? The main reason for cutting out sugar is that sugar provides zero nutritional value! One reason why we eat is to provide fuel to our body in the way of nutrition, vitamins, minerals and so forth. Sugar doesn't contain any of these things. So although we might like the taste of it, it's deplete of anything valuable as far as nutrition goes. And here are a few more reasons to cut it out: Sugar is also easy to overconsume Sugar is a refined product Sugar contains too many (empty) calories – no nutritional value = empty calories The fructose component of sugar is problematic – fructose gets metabolised entirely by the liver and converted directly into fat (not a pretty picture) Sugar does result in sharp rises to blood Continue reading >>

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Popular Questions

  1. Detective_Hacc

    So, I've had a pretty rough few months.
    I ate a pizza at the dare of a friend. I'm a guy, and my circle of friends apparently treats eating a whole pizza as some kind of manly feat. I wasn't opposed to the notion, but I'm slowly finding I should have been.
    Long story short, I ended up in the ER with a blood Glucose level of over 400.
    About a month later, I went in for my blood test to see if I was diabetic. (At this point I was sure of it. No one that has a blood Glucose level of 400 isn't Diabetic) <--- my thinking then.
    Now I just got the results of the test. My A1C is 5.9.
    My doctor was happy with that result, which makes me feel better, but she didn't tell me anything other than "That's really good."
    Is there anything I should worry about? what does an A1C of 5.9 mean for me?

  2. MintyFresh88

    Worrying isn't productive, but you should definitely see an endocrinologist. It is possible that you are a late onset type 1. An endocrinologist will order the tests necessary to rule this out. If you let it go you could wind up in the ER again (or worse). Not to be too negative, but sometimes general physicians aren't that great at diabetes. It took me years to find an endo. that specializes in diabetes to get the proper diagnosis.
    The HBA1C test returns a three-ish month average of your blood glucose levels. Most that have adult onset type 1 experience a 'honeymoon' period where insulin is still produced, but the pancreas is producing it inconsistently. You might have experienced a period where an insufficient amount insulin was being produced. This wouldn't really be exposed by an A1C test as it's just a blip in the data/average. 5.9 is actually a little high. Although I have issues with the term 'pre-diabetes,' 5.7 is the threshold.
    If you want to trust the doctor, you should at least consider monitoring your blood glucose level. I'm not a fan of Wal-Mart, but you can pick up a (Relion) meter, 50 test strips, and a lancing device (finger pricker) for about $30. The test strips are usually pretty expensive. The Relion strips are as inexpensive as it gets.
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/ReliOn-Prime-Blood-Glucose-Monitoring-System-Blue/20752266
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/ReliOn-Lancing-Device/34129433
    http://www.walmart.com/ip/ReliOn-Prime-Blood-Glucose-Test-Strips-50ct/20752265
    For now you should probably test 1-2 hours after you eat and when you wake up (fasting). A non-diabetic will rarely see >140 after eating or >100 fasting. Make sure your hands are clean when you test. Start by pricking the outside of a finger that's not your thumb or pointer finger using the lowest setting on the lancing device.
    Edit: Take a look at http://www.mayoclinic.org/tests-procedures/a1c-test/basics/results/prc-20012585 for more info regarding your test results.

  3. derphamster

    As adult onset T1 myself this is good advice - I was initially diagnosed type 2 and given Metformin and got my HbA1C down to 5.4 with that and diet. However I had strict limits on how many carbs I could eat at once before my blood glucose spiked 10+ mmol/l. Outside of meals I was seeing 4-5 mmol/l consistently.
    Antibody tests showed that I had adult onset type 1 however, which explained my situation perfectly as my pancreas is still partially functional and can still cope with up to ~20g carbs on its own. This sounds a lot like OP's situation where hba1c is almost normal yet he saw numbers high enough to send him to the ER after a pizza.
    I'd definitely try to get an antibody test done OP, as type 1 and type 2 are completely different animals and it's much better to know which you're dealing with. I was taken off Metformin and my numbers didn't budge; rapid (mealtime) insulin helped loads though - I can enjoy not feeling crappy after meals again! Sucks having to inject, but it's really worth it in terms of feeling normal!

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