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Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics

Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics? Reasons

Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics? Reasons

As there are lots of talk on sweet potatoes and diabetes 2, many have the doubt, sweet potatoes good for diabetic patients? It is believed that diabetic patients must avoid sugary stuff as it will hike the blood sugar level. But, many researches held so far as proved sweet potato for sugar patients are really helpful in many ways. Sweet potato for diabetics is really a boon. It is also said that Japanese sweet potato cures diabetes! People with high sugar level can enjoy relishing recipes with sweet potatoes that is beneficial for their health in plenty of ways. Fulfill your sugar craving by start cooking mouth-watering sweet potato recipes for diabetics! Now let us know reasons why sweet potatoes good for diabetics! Benefits of Sweet Potato for Diabetics Lowers Insulin Resistance Natural sugars present in sweet potatoes can stimulate insulin sensitivity and increase it. This in turn regulates blood sugar levels and keeps it in control. Protects Eyes Diabetic patients should often have eye tests as they are more prone to eye diseases. Adding sweet potatoes in diabetic diet powerfully protect eyes. Carotenoids in sweet potatoes gets converted to Vitamin A which is a vital vitamin for diabetics. This helps to protect eye damages caused of excess sugar levels. Healthy Bones and Skin Health Vitamin D which is good for bones, teeth, heart and skin are rich in sweet potatoes. There is a good relation between Vitamin D and diabetes. Vitamin D greatly helps for regular functioning of thyroid glands. It is also good for whole body health. Healthy Muscles, Nervous and Tissues Potassium powered in sweet potatoes help for tissues and muscles health. It prevents muscle weakness, nervous weakness, reduces swelling, lowers blood pressure and helps for heart health. It enhances muscle Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Potatoes?

Can people with diabetes eat potatoes? The answer is yes, and even more resounding when you have some info in your back pocket. Potatoes come in every form imaginable—from chips to potato salad, from fries to baked potatoes with butter and sour cream. Some forms are obviously more nutritious than others. And all can have varying effects on blood sugar. Here are some recommendations: Sweet potatoes and yams are good choices on the potato spectrum as they have a lower glycemic index and glycemic load than a regular baked russet potato, therefore affecting blood glucose less. Small red potatoes with the skin can also be a good choice. The skin provides fiber, which slows digestion and absorption. And small, whole potatoes may be easier to portion control. Serve a few on your plate as opposed to a whole baked potato or scoop of mashed potatoes. Try to limit fried potatoes and potato chips, choosing roasted, baked or broiled instead. Be aware of portion size. The plate method is an easy way to manage this: about ¼ of your plate should come from starchy foods and only the depth of a deck of cards. It might not be the potato itself wreaking havoc on blood sugar, but instead the portion of potatoes if it is more than about ¾ to 1 cup. Many, many years ago, nurses, dietitians, and diabetes educators were instructed to teach their patients with diabetes to eat certain foods and not eat others. But in more modern times, the belief and teaching method is based on making healthy food choices, understanding portion sizes, and learning the best times to eat in order to manage diabetes. This method of not having to eliminate foods from the diet is supported by the American Diabetes Association and the American Association of Diabetes Educators. Blood glucose control and food choice Continue reading >>

Why The Sweet Potato Is King

Why The Sweet Potato Is King

If you don't eat sweet potatoes very often, or only at holiday time when they're smothered in melted marshmallow goo and baked until they're unrecognizable, you're missing out on one of nature's truly perfect foods. They're low in calories, high in fiber, great for diabetics and people who are carbohydrate sensitive, and packed with vitamins and minerals. So good for you is the humble sweet potato that Nutrition Action Health Letter once rated it the number one healthiest vegetable. Because it's so delectable and versatile, the sweet potato is one of my favorite foods. [sidebar]Yam or Sweet Potato—The Final Answer This could very well be the winning answer on Jeopardy! some day, so pay close attention. Most people really don't know the difference between yams and sweet potatoes. Well, here's the story. All of the roots that are labeled yams in American supermarkets are actually sweet potatoes, cousins of morning glories. They come in different colors and textures. True yams are gigantic tropical roots not related to sweet potatoes, and they are seldom seen in our grocery stores. They can occasionally be found in the exotic veggie area of large supermarkets, particularly in neighborhoods with Hispanic populations. Despite this, many people insist on calling moist, orange-fleshed sweet potatoes yams, reserving the name sweet potatoes for the drier, yellow-fleshed varieties. Both are unrelated to regular white potatoes and are much, much better for you. When I visited Okinawa, Japan, I was delighted to discover purple sweet potatoes. Their flesh is actually bright purple, and Okinawans make them into everything from chips to ice cream. Undoubtedly, their pigments offer protection from cancer and other diseases. I hope we will be able to get them in the US one day soon. [ Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Ok For Diabetics

Are Sweet Potatoes Ok For Diabetics

You might determine to make much more than simply a holiday side dish after checking out the advantages of sweet potatoes. Though all of biggest nutrient in the sweet potatoes is the carbohydrate, the sweet potatoes are also great sources of beta carotene, vitamin A, fiber, vitamin B6 and vitamin C, as well as despite primarily being carbohydrate, lots of studies have shown that they also can help lower insulin resistance and stabilize your blood sugar levels. Sweet potatoes come with a lower glycemic index rating and are high in fiber. However it is some other factors which could explain its unique blood sugar lowering effects. You should know that adiponectin is the protein hormone produced by your fat cells. And diabetics tend to come with lower levels of the adiponectin, but the sweet potato extracts actually have been proven to greatly increase adiponectin levels in people with type 2 diabetes. Some studies have proven that phytonutients in a sweet potato could help lower your potential health risks posed by free radicals and heavy metals. This is useful not only for anyone who desires to lower the potential risks posed by the heavy metals residues like mercury in the diet but also for digestive tract issues such as ulcerative colitis and irritable bowel syndrome. Research has shown that phytonutients in a sweet potato can surely reduce markers of inflammation. Generally, a sweet potato with darker orange flesh packs more nutrients than a sweet potato with lighter flesh. A potato offers around 0 grams of fat, 3 grams of fiber, 22 grams of carbohydrate and 2 grams of protein. Plus notable: a sweet potato offers 28% of vitamin C, 12.5% of vitamin B6 and 260% of day-to-day recommended intake of vitamin A. sweet potato and blood sugar Don’t judge a food just by its n Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

The Best And Worst Foods To Eat If You Have Diabetes

Most of us take it for granted that we can eat whatever we like, although it may have an unwanted effect on our waistline. But diabetics have to be much more careful with what they consume, as their inability to produce any, or enough, insulin, means their blood sugar levels can become dangerously high if they eat whatever they fancy. [Read more: 6 surprising cholesterol-busting foods] [Revealed: Why am I always hungry? 6 reasons you’re feeling starving] However, as World Diabetes Day is marked on November 14, Diabetes UK points out that no foods are totally off-limits for diabetics – they just need to eat carefully. Libby Dowling, senior clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains: “If you have diabetes – whatever the type – no food is out of bounds, but you should aim for a healthy, balanced diet, just as everyone should. This is a diet which is low in sugar, salt and saturated fats and includes plenty of fruit and vegetables. “It’s fine to have a treat now and again, but maintaining a healthy diet most of the time can help you to manage your diabetes, and is good for your general health too.” Here are some suggestions for the best and worst foods to eat when you're diabetic: Frozen grapes Instead of sweets, try these fruity little gems, which turn into a creamy sorbet-style healthy snack when frozen. Although there are fruit sugars in them, there's less sugar than there is in sweets, and fruit's packed with vitamins, minerals and fibre. Sweet potatoes Sweet potatoes have been shown to stabilise blood sugar levels in diabetics by lowering insulin resistance. They also contain high amounts of fibre, which helps reduce levels of 'bad' LDL cholesterol, which is linked to cardiovascular disease. Almonds Eating almonds can help people with type 2 diabetes to Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Subscribe to our mailing list to receive informational contents, newsletters, and videos related with Ayurveda and our services. The task behind choosing the right choices of food for diabetics is always tricky. When most of the diets have a high carb value, the patient is left confused on what to eat and what not to eat. The same is the case with potatoes. While one tells you that eating potatoes within a certain restricted limited will not harm you, one another will tell you that you should completely stay away from potatoes. The fact being, they are tubers or thickened stems and are loaded with carbs. When it comes to sweet potatoes, it is the same advice you get again. With all this in mind, it is you who suffers at the end of the day. This article on the goodness/badness of sweet potatoes can widen your visibility towards the facts and figures of foods like sweet potatoes and after reading this you will be in a clear position to take the call, on which diet you want to be including and which ones you want to be restricting from. First and foremost, you must know that sweet potatoes comprise of a totally different package of nutrients than what the potatoes do. While potatoes belong to the tuber family, sweet potatoes belong to the storage root type. With a totally different set of nutrients in it, as mentioned before, sweet potatoes are one of the highly recommended diets for diabetics as per the American Diabetes Association. Now that makes you wonderstruck, isn’t it? There is more to come, read on. A small glance at the history of sweet potatoes Though it is known to be originated from Latin America, sweet potatoes are produced in maximum quantities from the Asian continent. Following rice, wheat, potatoes, maize and cassava, sweet potatoes are the 6th most imp Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

10 Reasons Why Sweet Potatoes Are Good For Diabetes Patients! Must Read!

10 Reasons Why Sweet Potatoes Are Good For Diabetes Patients! Must Read!

Sweet potatoes are a variety of potatoes, very similar to the regular potatoes and are often used like a substitute for them. However, sweet potatoes are a bit different in that they’re sweeter and they have a different shape and color. There are different colored sweet potatoes but the most common ones are the yellowish-orange and cream-colored potatoes. There are even purple colored sweet potatoes in some regions like Japan. Aside from being very delicious, sweet potatoes are also rich in antioxidants and many other nutrients which make them extremely health beneficial. They abound in vitamins, minerals and all the nutrients you need to consider adding them to your diet. Here are some amazing facts about sweet potatoes you’d like to know: 1. Sweet potatoes are good for diabetics thanks to its ability to stabilize the blood sugar levels. In people suffering from diabetes they also have the ability to control the insulin resistance. 2. These amazing veggies are extra rich in fibers so they will improve your digestion and help you detoxify your body as well. 3. They’re rich in vitamin A, an essential nutrient that stimulates respiratory system regeneration and are extra beneficial for smokers. 4. Sweet potatoes are also abundant in vitamin D, an essential vitamin for strong bones and teeth and improve your heart condition and skin quality. They will give you an energy boost and stimulate proper thyroid function. 5. Sweet potatoes help you absorb potassium better and this improves your heart function because potassium counteracts the negative effects of sodium in your organism. Potassium is also beneficial for blood pressure regulation and keeping your electrolytes levels in balance. 6. Moreover , the high level of potassium in sweet potatoes is beneficial for healt Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes And Diabetes: Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Sweet Potatoes And Diabetes: Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Diabetes is a complicated disease to handle, you always need to be careful of what you are eating and in how much quantity. As such, there are a lot of questions as to whether including a particular vegetable in the daily diet of a diabetic is safe or not. In this article, we shall explore more about the relationship between sweet potatoes and diabetes. Let us analyze and see whether including the sweet potatoes in the daily diet of a diabetic patient is healthy or not. Carbohydrates and Sweet Potatoes Let us first understand how carbohydrates are related to sweet potatoes or how much carbohydrate does this humble vegetable contain. It is known that a medium sized sweet potato contains somewhere around 25 to 26 grams of carbohydrates. Included in this is around 3.8 to 4 grams of fiber. If you take a cup and mash the sweet potatoes in the same, you will get around 58 grams of carbohydrates and around 8 grams of fiber. Read Also: Best Low Carb Snacks for Diabetics What makes the sweet potatoes healthy for a diabetes patient is the amount of dietary fiber found within the carbohydrate. This helps in stabilizing and maintaining a healthy level of blood glucose or blood sugar in a diabetic patient. Reasons Why Sweet Potatoes are Good for Diabetes Patients Following are a few reasons why sweet potato is a good vegetable option for all the diabetes patients: The natural sugar present in sweet potatoes is considered healthy as it helps in controlling the blood sugar levels in the patient’s body. This also enables the vegetable in increasing the body’s sensitivity towards the hormone insulin. Besides, sweet potatoes contain a good amount of potassium which helps the body to maintain a stable level of blood pressure. As a result, the heart- related conditions which are so com Continue reading >>

What's To Know About Sweet Potatoes?

What's To Know About Sweet Potatoes?

Sweet potatoes pack a powerful nutritional punch. In one medium spud, there is over 400 percent of your daily vitamin A requirement. Sweet potatoes also contain high amounts of fiber and potassium. They have more grams of natural sugars than regular potato but more overall nutrients with fewer calories. This MNT Knowledge Center feature is part of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. This article provides a nutritional breakdown and an in-depth look at the possible health benefits of consuming sweet potato, as well as explaining how to incorporate more sweet potatoes into meals, any potential health risks of consuming them, and how they differ from yams. One medium, baked sweet potato with skin contains just 103 calories. The fastest way to prepare a sweet potato is in the microwave. Although there is much confusion, sweet potatoes are not related to yams. Benefits Consuming fruits and vegetables of all kinds has long been associated with a reduced risk of many adverse health conditions. Research suggests that increasing consumption of plant foods, like sweet potatoes, decreases the risk of obesity, diabetes, heart disease, and overall mortality. A diet including fresh fruit and vegetables may also promote a healthy complexion, increased energy, and overall lower weight. Below are some specific benefits of consuming sweet potatoes. Diabetes Sweet potatoes are considered low on the glycemic index scale, and recent research suggests they may reduce episodes of low blood sugar and insulin resistance in people with diabetes. The fiber in sweet potatoes is also important. Studies have shown that people with type 1 diabetes who consume high-fiber diets have lower blood glucose levels, and people with type 2 diabetes have improved blood sugar, lipi Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Are Sweet Potatoes Good For Diabetics?

Sweet potatoes are a good food choice for diabetics as they are high in fiber and have a low glycemic index. Foods with a low glycemic index have less of an immediate impact on blood glucose levels, and therefore can help diabetics control their blood sugar. The method used to cook sweet potatoes will affect their glycemic index; certain cooking methods spike the glycemic index of sweet potatoes and render them less desirable for diabetics. Video of the Day The Glycemic Index The glycemic index measures how carbohydrates affect blood sugar. The system was developed by University of Toronto professor Dr. David J. Jenkins in an effort to determine which food best serves the needs of diabetics. The index tracks the rate at which carbohydrates are absorbed into the blood after digestion. The lower the glycemic index of a food, the better it is for diabetics, since it can help them avoid high blood sugar levels and possible diabetes complications. Sweet potatoes have a glycemic index of 44 – foods considered low on the glycemic index are 55 and less – so they are good for diabetics. Caiapo is the extract of a Japanese-grown white variety of sweet potato that is sold as a treatment for diabetes in that country. According to a 2004 study led by University of Vienna associate professor Dr. Berhhard Ludvik and published in the journal “Diabetes Care,” type 2 diabetic patients treated with caiapo saw significant decreases in fasting blood glucose levels and overall improvement in glucose control. The researchers concluded that the white sweet potato extract caiapo is good for diabetics as it can help them manage their condition. Sweet potatoes are also good for diabetics because they contain a good deal of fiber, particularly when the skins are left on. The amount of fibe Continue reading >>

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

How To Eat To Manage Diabetes - Top 10 Tips

Moderation is key when it comes to managing diabetes. Douglas Twenefour, clinical advisor at Diabetes UK, explains what to eat when and shares his top 10 tips for managing your diabetes... There is not a ‘one-size-fits-all’ eating pattern for people with diabetes, but Douglas Twenefour suggests tips that can be incorporated into individual healthy eating goals for people who have the condition... 1. Eat regular meals Spacing meals evenly throughout the day will help control your appetite and blood glucose levels – especially if you are on twice-daily insulin. 2. Opt for slowly absorbed carbohydrates All carbohydrates (carbs) affect blood glucose levels, so be conscious of how much you eat and opt for carbs that are more gradually absorbed. Try wholewheat pasta, basmati rice; granary, pumpernickel or rye bread; new potatoes in their skins, sweet potatoes and yams; oat-based cereals, such as porridge or natural (unsweetened) muesli. For more information, take a look at our Spotlight on... low-GI foods. 3. Cut the fat Eat less fat – particularly saturated fat. Try unsaturated fats and oils, especially monounsaturated fats like extra virgin olive oil and rapeseed oil, as these types of fat are better for your heart. Use lower fat dairy products including skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. Grill, steam or bake foods rather than frying. Remember that all fats contribute similar amounts of calories, so limit your overall intake if you are aiming to lose weight. 4. Five a day Aim for at least five portions of fruit and vegetables every day to give your body the vitamins, minerals and fibre it needs. A portion is: 1 medium-sized piece of fruit, like a banana or apple, 1 handful of grapes, 1 tablespoon (30g) dried fruit, 1 small glass (150ml) of unsweetened 100% fruit juice or Continue reading >>

Sweet Potatoes A Diabetic Superfood

Sweet Potatoes A Diabetic Superfood

Sweet potatoes are considered a superfood for diabetics, says the American Diabetes Association (AMA). They have been shown to stabilise blood-sugar levels by lowering insulin resistance. They contain a high amount of fibre, which also helps to reduce levels of "bad" LDL cholesterol in the body. Other superfoods for diabetics: The AMA also recommends beans, green leafy vegies, salmon, tomatoes, berries, citrus fruits and nuts for helping to manage diabetes. Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

Diabetes Diet: Six Foods That May Help Maintain Healthy Blood Sugar Levels

While there's no substitute for a balanced healthy diet, adding certain foods may help those with diabetes keep sugar levels under control. Coffee and cinnamon have made headlines as foods that might be able to help cut the risk of diabetes or help maintain healthy blood sugar levels. However, don't get the idea that such foods are magic pills for your diabetic diet. It's still important for people with diabetes to eat a balanced healthy diet and exercise to help manage the condition. Nevertheless, some foods, such as white bread, are converted almost immediately to blood sugar, causing a quick spike. Other foods, such as brown rice, are digested more slowly, causing a lower and gentler change in blood sugar. If you are trying to follow a healthy diet for diabetes, here are 6 suggestions that may help to keep your blood sugar in check. Porridge Porridge can help control blood sugar and the charity Diabetes UK recommends it to see you through the morning. Even though porridge is a carbohydrate, it's a very good carbohydrate. Because it's high in soluble fibre, it's slower to digest and it won't raise your blood sugar as much or as quickly. It's going to work better at maintaining a healthy blood sugar level over time. Not only does this high-quality carbohydrate offer a steadier source of energy than white bread, it can also help with weight loss. The soluble fibre in oats helps to keep us feeling fuller longer. That's important for people with type 2 diabetes, who tend to be overweight. If you reduce the weight, you usually significantly improve the glucose control. Barley isn't as popular as oats, but there's some evidence that barley, which is also high in soluble fibre, may also help with blood glucose control. Besides oats and barley, most whole grains are going to Continue reading >>

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

Are Sweet Potatoes Or Yams Good For Blood Sugar?

Although most of the calories in both sweet potatoes and yams come from carbs, they're still good food choices, even if you’re working hard at maintaining normal blood sugars. These starchy root vegetables are rich in fiber, which helps with blood sugar control. They're also low-glycemic carbs, so can be enjoyed on a diabetic diet, as long as you watch your portion size. Sweet Potato vs. Yams In the United States, most consumers consider sweet potatoes and yams the same food. But sweet potatoes and yams are two totally different root vegetables from different families. In fact, when you think you’re getting "yams" at the grocery store, you’re actually buying sweet potatoes. A true yam has a dark brown skin that looks like tree bark and flesh that’s either white, purple or red, not orange. Nutrition in Sweet Potatoes and Yams Nutritionally, both sweet potatoes and yams are low in calories, fat-free and high in carbs. A 1/2-cup serving of baked sweet potato has 90 calories, 20 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fiber. The same serving of yams has 80 calories, 19 grams of carbs, and 3 grams of fiber. But the sweet potato is a slightly better source of most vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C, potassium and magnesium. Plus, the sweet potato is way higher in beta-carotene. Glycemic Index of the Root Vegetables Both sweet potatoes and yams have a low glycemic index, or GI. The glycemic index ranks carbohydrates on a scale of 0 to 100 on how they affect blood sugar. Foods with a low GI digest more slowly and release sugar gradually into the bloodstream, keeping blood sugar steady. In addition to helping maintain even blood sugar levels, eating more low-GI foods like these root vegetables may help lower your risk of type 2 diabetes, improve heart health and make it e Continue reading >>

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