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Are Potatoes Bad For A Diabetic?

Carbohydrates And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Carbohydrates And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Carbohydrates are our main source of energy and provide important nutrients for good health and a healthy, balanced diet. All the carbohydrates you eat and drink are broken down into glucose. The type, and amount, you consume can make a difference to your blood glucose levels and diabetes management. The two main types of carbohydrates Starchy foods: these include bread, pasta, potatoes, yams, breakfast cereals and couscous. Sugars: these can be divided into naturally occurring and added sugars: Naturally occurring: sugars found in fruits (fructose) and some dairy foods (lactose). Added sugars: found in sweets, chocolate, sugary drinks and desserts. Fibre This is another type of carbohydrate, which you can’t digest. Insoluble fibre, such as is found in wholemeal bread, brown rice and wholegrain cereals, helps keep the digestive system healthy. Soluble fibre, such as bananas, apples, carrots, potatoes, oats and barley, helps to keep your blood glucose and cholesterol under control. Make sure you eat both types of fibre regularly. Good sources of fibre include fruit and veg, nuts and seeds, oats, wholegrain breads and pulses. How much? Everyone needs some carbohydrate every day. The actual amount that you need to eat will depend on your age, activity levels and the goals you – and your family – are trying to achieve, for example trying to lose weight, improve blood glucose levels or improve sports performance. The total amount of carbohydrate eaten will have the biggest effect on your glucose levels. Insulin and carb counting If you’re living with diabetes, and take insulin, you’ll need to take that into account when eating carbs. Learn about which foods contain carbohydrates, how to estimate carbohydrate portions and how to monitor their effect on blood glucose Continue reading >>

Should People Suffering From Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Should People Suffering From Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Potatoes are a controversial food for diabetics. Most believe that eating potatoes in any form – boiled, baked, fried or in a vegetable preparation can make their glucose levels soar. However, this isn’t completely false. Potatoes can mess with a diabetic’s meal plan. Being a nutrient dense food, high in complex carbohydrates and dietary fibre, they are high on the glycemic index. The glycemic index (GI) is an indicator of how fast the carbohydrates present in your food will raise your blood glucose levels. Foods with high GI will raise the levels quickly as compared to food with low GI value. Here is a sample diabetic meal plan for you to follow. In the case of potatoes, all the starch and carbohydrate present in it breaks down into glucose and raises your blood sugar level after consumption. The GI of a boiled white potato is 85, which is quite high. Here are eight healthy foods that are bad for diabetics. What you can do? That said you don’t have to say no to potatoes completely. If you are cautious about your diet and exercise regularly, then probably you can include potatoes in your meal. Remember, even if you are diabetic your body will still need carbohydrates for energy. So, first consider what your carbohydrate requirement is and how much do you need. Here are seven fruits that are good for diabetics. If you are a diabetic your goal should be to limit your carbohydrate consumption to 45 to 65 percent of your total caloric intake, which means if your consume 2200 calories of food in a day around 1450 calories should come from carbohydrates. This indicates that if you include one small bowl (katori) of potato in one of your main meals you can still be safe. The idea is not to overdo food. Too much aloo ka sabzi can definitely wreck havoc on your glucose l Continue reading >>

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes: Good Or Bad?

Potatoes have long been considered the most basic of basic foods, a no-frills staple for the everyman or everywoman. One reason potatoes have earned this distinction is, no doubt, their low cost, but another may be their basic nutritional qualities: They are fat-, sodium-, and cholesterol-free, and a medium-size potato contains just 110 calories. Nevertheless, the reputation of potatoes has taken a hit lately due to their relatively high glycemic index, which means that the carbohydrate in them is quickly converted to glucose when digested. Many people with diabetes take glycemic index into account when deciding what foods to incorporate into their diet. So how good or bad are potatoes when it comes to weight control and glucose tolerance? A study examining these topics was published earlier this month by the Journal of the American College of Nutrition. According to an article on the study in the Daily Mail, the effect of potatoes on weight control may be modestly positive. Researchers assigned 90 overweight participants to one of three groups. Two of these groups were taught how to reduce their daily caloric intake by 500 calories, but one group was taught how to do this by eating mostly high-glycemic-index foods, and the other by eating mostly low-glycemic-index foods. The third group was not told to change anything about the caloric or glycemic-index composition of their diet. All three groups were told, however, to consume 5–7 servings of potatoes per week. After 12 weeks of following their prescribed diets, there were no significant differences between the groups in terms of weight loss or body composition changes. All three groups, however, experienced modest weight loss and improvements in body composition. Since the only dietary change that all three groups h Continue reading >>

Do Potatoes Cause Diabetes?

Do Potatoes Cause Diabetes?

Are potatoes dangerous? Do potatoes cause diabetes? You might think so if you followed the headlines. In 2006, the media was full of reports making these claims, some of which are still being made today. All of this attention was based on the results of a study published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition.1 The prospective study followed 84,555 women in the famed Nurses’ Health Study. At the start, the women, aged 34–59 years, had no history of chronic disease, and completed a validated food frequency questionnaire. These women were then followed for 20 years with repeated assessments of their diet. The study concluded, “Our findings suggest a modest positive association between the consumption of potatoes and the risk of type 2 diabetes in women. This association was more pronounced when potatoes were substituted for whole grains.” So, let’s take a closer look at the study and see how accurate these claims are, and where the truth really lies. Specifically, we will look at five key points. Are all potatoes equal? Or “When is a potato not a potato?” In the study, participants were asked how often, on average, in the previous year, they had consumed potatoes. The options they were given to choose from were either: a) One baked or one cup mashed potato b) 4 ounces of french-fried potatoes These were the only two choices the subjects could pick from. So, while these may represent how potatoes are often consumed here in America, they do not account for any differences in how the potatoes were prepared and served. And mashed potatoes were counted in with baked potatoes, which are two completely different forms of preparing potatoes. In America, whether it is at home or in restaurants, most all mashed potatoes are made with milk and butter and/or marg Continue reading >>

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes - Health

Best And Worst Foods For Diabetes - Health

If you have diabetes , watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fatparticularly unhealthy fatsare problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk . Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabetes. A 16-ounce Frappuccino at Starbucks, for instance, can conta Continue reading >>

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

Mashed Potatoes On A Diabetic Diet

According to the North Carolina Potato Association, the average adult consumes about one potato each day, and potatoes are the second most consumed food in America after dairy products. A side of mashed potatoes with a meal may be an American staple, but if you have diabetes, you may be concerned about the carbohydrate content of this popular side dish. You can include mashed potatoes as part of your diabetic diet, and preparation and serving size will help you keep your blood sugar under control. Video of the Day Carbohydrates and Mashed Potatoes Diabetes occurs when your body cannot effectively control your blood sugar levels. Carbohydrates affect blood sugar, so the American Diabetes Association's meal plan recommends that people with diabetes limit their carbohydrate intake to 45 percent of their total calories, or 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal. Fruit, vegetables, grains, breads and added sugar all contribute to the carbohydrate total of your meal. One cup of mashed potatoes prepared with whole milk provides 174 calories and 37 grams of carbohydrates, between 62 and 82 percent of the total carbohydrates recommended for an entire meal. Mashed potatoes also rate high on the glycemic index, a tool that measures a food's impact on blood sugar levels. Unprocessed, high-fiber foods, such as whole grains and most fruits and vegetables, tend to be low-glycemic foods because fiber slows the rate of blood sugar increase. Processing and cooking often increases the glycemic index of foods. High-glycemic foods have a rating of 70 or above. The University of Sydney’s glycemic index database reports that mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 83. Instant mashed potatoes have a glycemic index of 87, according to Harvard Health Publications. If you follow the glycemic Continue reading >>

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

Can You Eat Eggs If You Have Diabetes?

To eat or not to eat? Eggs are a versatile food and a great source of protein. The American Diabetes Association considers eggs an excellent choice for people with diabetes. That’s primarily because one large egg contains about half a gram of carbohydrates, so it’s thought that they aren’t going to raise your blood sugar. Eggs are high in cholesterol, though. One large egg contains nearly 200 mg of cholesterol, but whether or not this negatively affects the body is debatable. Monitoring your cholesterol is important if you have diabetes because diabetes is a risk factor for cardiovascular disease. High levels of cholesterol in the bloodstream also raise the risk of developing cardiovascular disease. But dietary intake of cholesterol doesn’t have as profound an effect on blood levels as was once thought. So, it’s important for anyone with diabetes to be aware of and minimize other heart disease risks. A whole egg contains about 7 grams of protein. Eggs are also an excellent source of potassium, which supports nerve and muscle health. Potassium helps balance sodium levels in the body as well, which improves your cardiovascular health. Eggs have many nutrients, such as lutein and choline. Lutein protects you against disease and choline is thought to improve brain health. Egg yolks contain biotin, which is important for healthy hair, skin, and nails, as well as insulin production. Eggs from chickens that roam on pastures are high in omega-3s, which are beneficial fats for people with diabetes. Eggs are easy on the waistline, too. One large egg has only about 75 calories and 5 grams of fat, only 1.6 grams of which are saturated fat. Eggs are versatile and can be prepared in different ways to suit your tastes. You can make an already-healthy food even better by mixi Continue reading >>

Eating Potatoes Like This Can Be Healthy For Diabetics

Eating Potatoes Like This Can Be Healthy For Diabetics

Home Magazine Diabetes Eating Potatoes Like THIS Can Be Healthy For Diabetics Eating Potatoes Like THIS Can Be Healthy For Diabetics Expert-reviewed byAshwini S.Kanade, Registered Dietician and Certified Diabetes Educator with 17 years of experience Bake them, mash them, grill them or deep-fry them, potatoes in any form or shape are a delight to eat! Touted to be an important food staple and the number one vegetable crop in the world, they are available all year-round in India.But did you know that potatoes are a starchy, tuberous crop from the perennial plant Solanum tuberosum? They are a complex carbohydrate similar to rice, wheat and other ground provisions. Carbohydrate options for diabetes is usually defined by the Glycemic Index value. The glycemic index rating of potatoes makes them a bad carb. Any GI score above 70 is high, indicating the food causes a rapid spike in blood sugar. The GI of potatoes is variable between 58 and 111; on an average, it is 78 for a boiled one and 87 for an instant cooked one. However, potatoes are incredibly popular worldwide an, arent considered unhealthy unless and until deep fried. So, should diabetics really be eating potatoes? Let us find out! First of all, Lets Understand the Relationship Between Glycemic Index and Diabetes According to Dr Manoj Kutteri, Wellness Director at Atmantan Wellness Centre, Our body performs at an optimum level when the blood sugar is kept relatively constant and not fluctuating to the extremes. When the blood sugar drops too low, one becomes lethargic and experience increased hunger. If it goes very high, our brain signals the pancreas to secrete more insulin. Insulin helps to strike a balance in the blood sugar level by converting the excess sugar to fat.The higher the blood sugar level, the more wi Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Potatoes And Rice: Linked To Diabetes And Obesity?

Potatoes And Rice: Linked To Diabetes And Obesity?

Do potatoes and rice increase your risk of type 2 diabetes? Find out from Ms Peggy Tan, Dietitian at Tiong Bahru Community Health Centre​.  Potatoes Can eating potatoes make you fat? Both potatoes and rice are complex carbohydrates and if eaten in moderation will not make you fat. They can, however, cause weight gain if they are cooked with butter, margarine, cream or any other fatty substance, instead of just boiled in water. The cooking method used can significantly increase the calorie value of both rice and potato. For instance, a 5-ounce (142g) portion of hash browns, cooked in oil or butter, has 375 calories, while a 5-ounce (142g) portion of French fries has 435 calories. Potato chips that have been deep-fried have more than five times the number of calories than a boiled potato. Similarly, rice that is fried or cooked with fat, such as chicken rice or nasi biryani, will have higher calories than steamed rice. The choice of portion sizes can also lead to weight gain. Excess calories will add up if you double the portions or indulge in high-calorie potato and rice preparations daily, instead of having them as an occasional treat. In addition, the lack of physical activity can also exacerbate weight gain. Can eating rice and potatoes raise your risk of type 2 diabetes? Most varieties of rice and potatoes are high glycemic index carbohydrates and have been linked to a higher risk of type 2 diabetes. That is because these starchy carbohydrates are quickly broken down into glucose and absorbed into the bloodstream, which can cause blood sugar and insulin levels to rise. However, the evidence against rice and potatoes is not conclusive. Some studies have found a link between these foods and diabetes, while others have not. Since both rice and potatoes have many nu Continue reading >>

Potato Nutrition 5 Common Potato Myths Debunked

Potato Nutrition 5 Common Potato Myths Debunked

Potato Nutrition 5 Common Potato Myths Debunked If you're like most people, you may be on the fence about whether potatoes are actually good for you. Understanding potato nutrition has become overly complex, and unfortunately the truth about these starchy vegetables has become overly complicated. Riddled with such claims as potatoes are too high in carbohydrate or potatoes have a high glycemic index, it has become downright confusing to determine whether potatoes are worth keeping in your diet, or whether they belong in your trash can. In this post, well address 5 common potato myths and get to the bottom of potato nutrition so that you know the truth. Spoiler alert: potatoes are extremely good for you. Myth #1: Potatoes Are High in Carbohydrates and Will Spike Your Blood Glucose If you believe any of these statements, then its not your fault. Since the advent of the Atkins diet, America has been fed a host of anti-carbohydrate propaganda. Carbohydrates are a fuel for all tissues in your body Your brain runs off of glucose for 99.99% of your life Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in your muscles, for use during exercise Carbohydrates are stored as glycogen in your liver, to provide your brain with a drip-feed of glucose 24 hours a day Carbohydrates are converted into fat, but at a terribly slow and inefficient pace in the human body (2) Take a look at the nutrition facts label shown here for a medium white potato (3): A single medium white potato contains about 150 calories A single medium white potato contains about 40g of carbohydrate A single medium white potato contains about 5 grams of protein A single medium white potato contains almost no fat Many people with diabetes will pass up white potatoes, sweet potatoes and yams because they are high in carbohydrates, Continue reading >>

Should People With Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Should People With Diabetes Eat Potatoes?

Myths about foods people with diabetes should eat or not eat are numerous. Potatoes are one of these foods that have gotten a very bad rap — and because potatoes are known to be a “starchy” vegetable, and break down into sugar, many misinformed people believe that they should be completely avoided in those with diabetes. This couldn’t be further from the truth! Facts about the Potato Potatoes are fat-free, cholesterol-free, high in vitamin C, high in potassium, and a good source of vitamin B6 and dietary fiber An average 5.3-ounce potato with the skin contains 45 percent of the daily value for vitamin C, 620 milligrams of potassium (comparable to bananas, spinach and broccoli), and trace amounts of thiamin, riboflavin, folate, magnesium, phosphorous, iron and zinc. This nutrient powerhouse contains only 110 calories, no fat or cholesterol, 16 milligrams of sodium, 24 grams of carbohydrate, 2 grams of fiber and 3 grams of protein. A half-cup serving of potatoes is considered one carbohydrate choice (15 grams) in the diabetes meal-planning world. Think of a “computer-mouse” as one-serving size of a whole baked potato (about a quarter of a large potato). Facts about the Sweet Potato Sweet potatoes are rich in beta-carotene (a form of vitamin A). The body converts the beta-carotene in one serving of sweet potatoes to more than twice the daily requirement of vitamin A. Beta-carotene is a powerful cancer fighter that also reduces blood cholesterol. In plants, beta-carotene serves to protect leaves and stems from the ravages of sunlight and other environmental threats. In humans, these same compounds help block cancer formation, and also protect against arthritis and other degenerative diseases. In addition, sweet potatoes provide nearly as much vitamin E as do fat Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Diet Choices If You Have Diabetes

If you have diabetes, in many ways your diet is your medicine. As diabetes educators, we help patients understand what food and beverage choices are best to avoid. When foods are high in carbohydrates, fat and sodium, they increase your risk for high blood pressure, high cholesterol, weight gain, heart disease and uncontrolled sugar . Cleveland Clinic is a non-profit academic medical center. Advertising on our site helps support our mission. We do not endorse non-Cleveland Clinic products or services. Policy Sweetened drinks. These include regular pop/soda, fruit punches and iced teas. These are loaded with sugar and calories, and they usually have little or no nutritional value. Instead, try infusing plain water with different berries and fruits so you can enjoy the natural sweetness. “Designer” or specialty coffee drinks – including frappuccinos or cappuccinos. That “once a day special treat” can add up to lots of extra sugar, calories and saturated fat. Instead, go for straight java, either black, with artificial sweetener or a small splash of skim milk. Whole milk. It has too much fat, which can lead to weight gain. Switch to 2 percent, 1 percent – or even better: skim milk. Keep in mind that one cup of skim milk has 12 grams of carbohydrates. If you don’t like milk or are lactose intolerant, you can drink almond milk, rice milk or soy milk instead—but remember to get the low sugar varieties. Hot dogs. These grilled little favorites are still high in saturated fat and sodium—yes, that even includes turkey dogs! Try to avoid them or eat them only occasionally. Packaged lunch meats. These are also high in saturated fat and sodium. Check your deli for low sodium meats—or better yet use sliced meat that you’ve roasted at home to make your sandwic Continue reading >>

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

Why Do Potatoes Raise Blood Glucose More Than Sugar?

It can be surprising to find out that potatoes are generally high on the glycemic index (GI), which rates how much certain foods raise your blood glucose. After all, it's a staple in diets throughout the world because potatoes are an affordable and nutritious vegetable. Plus, most people associate blood sugar with foods that contain sugar. How is it that a potato has a higher GI than white sugar? It's all about the starch and how it converts to glucose in your body. However, not all potatoes are created equal and there are ways to lower their impact on your blood glucose. You may still be able to enjoy a few potatoes here and there, you'll just want to keep your servings in check. Too often, glucose is associated with sweetness and regular white potatoes are not a food that's generally considered sweet. Potatoes are almost all starch, though, and that starch is made up of long strings of glucose. Since the starch in potatoes is rapidly digested, the glycemic index of potatoes can be almost as high as that of glucose alone. The glycemic index of glucose is 100 points where potatoes are usually listed as being in the high 80s or low 90s. Sucrose (table sugar), on the other hand, has a GI of 59 and is a disaccharide (two sugar) molecule. It is made up of one glucose molecule and one fructose molecule joined together. Fructose is processed differently in your body than glucose, and it doesn't affect your blood sugar as much. However, fructose causes problems of its own when you eat too much of it. With that, it's fair to say that an ounce of carbohydrate from potatoes has twice the glucose as sugar. When you think of it that way, it's only logical that potatoes would raise blood glucose more. There are many varieties of potatoes and it would not be accurate to say that eve Continue reading >>

Prediabetes And Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok To Eat?

Prediabetes And Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok To Eat?

Prediabetes and Potatoes: Are Potatoes Ok to Eat? Many ladies tell me they haven't eaten a potato since they got diagnosed with Prediabetes and Insulin Resistance. Are potatoes bad? Do you have to avoid them? Today I'll tell you if Prediabetes and Potatoes are ok together...AND tell you what you can eat and what you can't. Potatoes have gotten a bad rap lately and most of it is total nonsense! Some people even say eating a potato is the same as drinking soda! I have to tell you ladies...potatoes are VERY healthy for you! Some potatoes are much better than others, AND some ways of cooking potatoes are WAYYYY better for blood sugar control. I'll talk about that in a bit... We need to talk about all the good stuff in potatoes. Potatoes are a Nutrition-Packed Powerhouse 1. Potatoes Have More Potassium Than A Banana! (potassium lowers blood pressure and blood sugar) In fact, in a study of over 12,000 people, the incidence of diabetes went UP as potassium levels went DOWN! And doctors have linked Type 2 Diabetes to low levels of potassium. 2. Potatoes Are An Excellent Source Of Vitamin C Vitamin C deficiency has been linked to poor blood sugar control. Low Vitamin C levels are also linked to inflammation (which you've got tons of because of your Insulin Resistance). 3. Potatoes Are A Good Source Of B Vitamins B vitamins are essential for proper metabolism INCLUDING blood sugar control. Low Vitamin B6 is linked to nerve damage in Type 2 Diabetes. 4. Potatoes Are A Great Source Of Essential Minerals Low magnesium has been linked to Type 2 Diabetes and is essential for proper blood sugar control. Proper mineral balance is also essential for healthy blood pressure levels. High Blood Pressure is linked with Type 2 Diabetes. Prediabetes and Potatoes & Blood Sugar Control A lot of Continue reading >>

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