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Are Pineapples Good For Diabetics

Diabetes Type 2 Diet, Experts On Best Recipe, Ideal Time To Eat Pineapples

Diabetes Type 2 Diet, Experts On Best Recipe, Ideal Time To Eat Pineapples

For diabetes patients, pineapples could be a good fruit option. Pineapples are loaded with thiamine (Vitamin B1), Vitamin C, and rich in iron. (Shutterstock) A healthy diet should include servings of various fruits. Pineapple is one such fruit that is a powerhouse of nutrition and tastes great as well. It is loaded with thiamine (Vitamin B1), Vitamin C, and rich in iron. It also contains an enzyme called bromelain which aids digestion and its juice is considered to be a diuretic. It is also an antioxidant and has anti-inflammatory properties. Being rich in manganese, it also boosts bone health. But while pineapples are considered beneficial for asthma patients , diabetics are recommended to exercise caution while eating the fruit. Regardless of its health benefits, it is high in sugar and not the best option for diabetics. It can be had in moderation considering the balance caloric intake is taken care of, says nutrition consultant Karishma Chawla. Rekha Sharma , HeadNutrition, VLCC, says that as long as the serving size is moderate, diabetics can eat pineapples. Pineapple can be a healthy choice for diabetics as it contains vitamins, minerals, fibres and other healthy nutrients to support good health, says Sharma. Incorporate pineapples in a salad. (Shutterstock) The best time to consume fruits, including pineapples, is in the first half of the day and without combining it with another meal to keep sugar levels in check. Some of the best ways to incorporate pineapple in a diabetics diet is to add a few pieces in oat porridge with skimmed milk, in a pineapple salad, as a green smoothie with pineapple, or as flavouring for a whey smoothie, suggests Chawla. Sharma adds that pineapples can be incorporated in meat-based preparations as it contains Proteolytic enzyme, which Continue reading >>

Is Pineapple Good For Diabetes?

Is Pineapple Good For Diabetes?

Diabetes is a common problem in which the patient suffers a high blood sugar level. There are different types of diabetes Type 1 Diabetes, Type 2 Diabetes and a condition called Gestational Diabetes, which occurs in some women during pregnancy. If you have diabetes, your body either does not make the required amount of insulin or the body cells doesnt respond to the secreted insulin (cant use the insulin) that the body secretes or sometimes both the problems are present. It is a long term disease that has a lot to do with the food that you consume. This is because the sugar level in the blood is directly dependent on the amount of sugar (in the form of glucose) that is supplied to the body through food. Hence, a diabetes diet must be determined carefully and wisely. Pineapple is one such fruit which has a lot of controversy as to whether it is safe or not for diabetics. A diabetes diet simply means eating the healthy foods (low Trans Fats, less carbohydrate) in moderate amounts, without skipping the usual or regular mealtimes. It must be rich in naturally occurring nutrients as well as, have low amounts of calories and fat, making the diet plan healthy. In this, the key elements are fruits, vegetables and whole grains. Fruits play one of the most important roles in planning a healthy and balanced diet for a diabetes patient. They are an excellent source of various sorts of vitamins and minerals that help in keeping the blood sugar level in check. One such mineral present in many fruits is potassium, which helps in reducing blood pressure. A common fruit pineapple is often regarded as an unhealthy fruit in diabetes diet, because of its high carbohydrate content that makes the fruit sweet. Since the body breaks the carbohydrate into sugar, the blood sugar level is rapidl Continue reading >>

Does A Pineapple Make Blood Sugar Low?

Does A Pineapple Make Blood Sugar Low?

As a source of carbs, mostly sugar, it's unlikely that pineapple could lower your blood sugar. However, as a fruit that digests more quickly than others, you may experience a rebound low blood sugar effect, especially if you have diabetes. That being said, if you’re experiencing low blood sugar after eating pineapple, you might want to consult with a dietitian to evaluate the cause and develop a personalized diet strategy to keep blood sugars normal. Pineapple Nutrition As a fruit filled with good-for-you nutrients, pineapple makes a healthy addition to any diet. One cup of fresh cubed pineapple has 80 calories, 22 grams of carbs, 16 grams of sugar, 2 grams of fiber and 1 gram of protein. A cup of canned pineapple packed in its own juice is a little higher in calories and carbs, with 140 calories, 34 grams of carbs, 30 grams of sugar and 2 grams of fiber. Pineapple, both fresh and canned, is also a good source of vitamin C and manganese. According to the American Diabetes Association, pineapple makes a healthy fruit choice for people with diabetes too. Medium-Glycemic Fruit If you’re feeling a little shaky an hour or two after eating some pineapple, it may be related to its glycemic index. The glycemic index is a tool that measures how carb-containing foods like pineapple affect blood sugar. Foods with a low-glycemic index cause a small, even rise in blood sugar, while foods with a high-glycemic index cause a fast rise and then a drop in blood sugar. Pineapple is a medium-glycemic food, so it’s possible that it may cause a slight rise and drop in blood sugar. However, diabetics are encouraged to eat all fruits, even those with a medium-glycemic index. Tips for Eating Pineapple There’s no need to avoid pineapple, even if you think it’s causing low blood sugar. Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

Fresh Pineapple | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Fresh Pineapple | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Following my post-stroke diagnosis of diabetes, I'm trying to get myself back in control of my life. My GP is keen to control my diabetes by diet, which I am very happy with and I'm on a Statin and Clopedrigrel. I'm going to go with a low-carb diet. Having seen my incredibly helpful GP last week, I have my first appointment with the Diabetic Nurse on Friday - which I am a bit apprehensive about as when she gave me my blood test results on the phone, she just said you are diabetic and literally put the phone down without offering any advice at all, just saying that I could wait to see the doctor at my next appointment 6 days away. I hope that I'll be given a glucose monitor so I can get some idea of my levels as I do various activities so I can work out the best routines for myself, but the GP has said they don't always give out monitors to diet-controlled diabetes - in which case I shall be buying my own. Since my stroke was confirmed nearly 4 weeks ago, I've managed to lose nearly half-a-stone by cutting all the rubbish out of my vegetarian diet, walking and using the Wii to re-hab my left side which was damaged by the stroke. Now I have all the all-clear to increase my exercise, I've increased the distance that I'm walking to between 1.5 - 2 miles and feel so much better for doing so. Over the last week I've found that walking about an hour after eating porridge for breakfast is working well. Yesterday because I am aware that I'm not eating enough fruit, so I added some fresh pineapple to the porridge. Today I did the same and my walk felt like I was climbing Mount Everest. Anyone have idea if it might be the pineapple? Any idea of what fruits can b Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pineapples: Do's And Don'ts

Diabetes And Pineapples: Do's And Don'ts

If you have diabetes, you know how important it is to track the food you eat. Although maintaining your blood sugar levels is important, you must also consider your carbohydrate intake. Fruits such as pineapple can be a healthy a choice for people with diabetes. Certain fruits contain vitamins, minerals, and fiber that can be beneficial to your diet. But they also can contain carbohydrates that can affect your blood sugar, so moderation is key. Well share some tips for balancing your diet and break down the pros and cons of pineapple. A healthy diet is crucial to managing your diabetes. You should track your daily carbohydrate consumption and maintain a healthy meal plan. Your diet should consist of foods that are high in vitamins, minerals, and nutrients. These can be found in: You should avoid foods that are high in fat, foods that are highly processed, and sweets. A nutritionist or doctor can help you determine a balanced diet that manages your condition. Many people with diabetes count their daily intake of carbs. This is because carbs are responsible for raising blood sugar levels. You may use a meal plan that counts the carbohydrates you consume at each meal. This approach can help you manage your blood sugar levels effectively. The number of carbohydrates you consume at each meal and snack depends on many factors. These factors include: your goals for your blood glucose readings A rule of thumb for carbohydrate counting is 45-60 grams of carbs per meal and 15-20 grams of carbs per snack. Along with counting carbs, you may also factor in the glycemic index when eating. The glycemic index measures how carbs raise your blood sugar. Some foods cause the blood sugar to rise more rapidly than others. Factors contributing to glycemic index in foods are: Fresh or frozen Continue reading >>

Can People With Diabetes Eat Pineapple?

Can People With Diabetes Eat Pineapple?

How It Compares to Other Fruits on the Glycemic Index By Debra Manzella, RN | Reviewed by Richard N. Fogoros, MD Pineapple is a sweet fruit that many diabetics shy away from because of its presumed effect on blood sugar. But is it something that you need to avoid like the plague, or can it be consumed safely without any ill effects to your health? Generally speaking, it is a myth that people with diabetes need to avoid fruit. Fruit is a healthy food source of vitamins, minerals, and fiber and avoiding them can deprive your body of much-needed antioxidants, folate, bioflavonoids, and potassium. If you are diabetic, you can eat fruit but simply need to limit your intake since it will invariably contain carbohydrates . Carbohydrates are the macronutrients which impact the blood sugar most. The amount can vary from one fruit to the next with some "less sweet" fruits having more carbs than sweeter ones. We measure these values using a system called the glycemic index (GI) which ranks how fast carbohydrate-based foods can raise your blood sugar level. High-GI foods (with a ranking over 70) will raise your blood sugar and insulin levels quicker than low-GI foods (55 or under). Ultimately, it's not so much about whether or not you can eat fruit but how much you consume within the constraints of your recommended diet . Pineapple is a fat-free food rich in fiber and vitamins. Fiber is especially important to diabetics as it can help to lower blood sugar, reduce cholesterol, and regulate bowels. In fact, a single, one-cup serving of fresh pineapple has an impressive 2.2 grams of fiber with only 78 calories. However, pineapple also has a relatively high GI ranking compared to other fruits. According to an analysis from the Institute of Obesity, Nutrition, and Exercise at the Unive Continue reading >>

The Negative Effects Of Pineapples On Diabetics

The Negative Effects Of Pineapples On Diabetics

The Negative Effects of Pineapples on Diabetics Sliced pineapple on wooden tabletop.Photo Credit: utah778/iStock/Getty Images A study published in "Diabetes Care" in July 2003 found that a diet low on the glycemic index made it easier for people to maintain a healthy blood sugar level. Although pineapple can be a nutritious food since it provides significant amounts of vitamin C, thiamine and manganese, people with diabetes may want to limit their pineapple consumption due to its high carbohydrate content and glycemic index. Glycemic index and glycemic load estimate the potential effect of a food on your blood sugar levels. Fresh pineapple has a high glycemic index of 94, and canned pineapple in juice has a GI between 61 and 79, making it a moderate- to high-GI food. This doesn't take into account serving size, however. A serving of slightly under 3/4 cup of fresh pineapple has a glycemic load of 6, putting it in the low category and making it unlikely to cause blood sugar spikes. Pineapple is fine for diabetics as long as they watch their serving size. Eat pineapple with foods low in carbohydrates or low on the glycemic index to decrease your meal's overall glycemic load and limit blood sugar increases. Watch your total carbohydrate intake at the meal. Have no more than three to five 15-gram carbohydrate servings per meal. Each cup of raw pineapple has about 22 grams of carbohydrates, and the same amount of drained juice-pack canned pineapple has about 28 grams. Pineapple canned in heavy syrup has over 51 grams of carbohydrates per 1-cup serving. Lose Weight. Feel Great!Change your life with MyPlate by LIVESTRONG.COM Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Pineapple

Can Diabetics Eat Pineapple

Lisa Rivera | August 29, 2017 | Fruits for Diabetes | No Comments If you have type 2 diabetes eating right fruits focusing on different healthy fruits from all the fruits groups, sticking to the regular mealtimes. Find your right serving size and how many calories, proteins, fats and carbohydrates are in your fruits. This can help us track the fruit we eat and keep our blood glucose levels in a safe range. Certain fruits, especially when eat alone, increase your blood glucose levels fast. But certain fruits have fiber, minerals and vitamins that can be useful to your diet. You just need to keep track o the amount of carbohydrate you eat day-to-day, which keep your blood sugar under control. A higher amount of carbohydrates in the diet has a tendency to enhance weight gain and your blood sugar levels. The foods diabetics eat should just have 15 grams of carbs. Every cup of raw pineapples has 21.6 grams o carbs. According to some studies, pineapple canned in juice has more carbohydrate content. Dont eat pineapple canned in heavy syrup as it has higher effect on your blood sugar levels. If you are diabetic and want to avoid raising your blood sugar levels, you should be familiar with GI. Many diabetics may be very confused as to if to include fruit like pineapple into their diet, because it has sugar. So it is important to know how the GI works as well as how to make the blood sugar levels stable. Pineapple has a GI ranking of 66. It falls within the upper-half of the glycemic index range of 57 to 68. However unsweetened pineapple juice receives a glycemic index of 47. Canned pineapple, canned in juice receives a similar GI to pineapple juice at about 43. But some pineapple canned in heavy sugary syrup might raise the GI. I prefer to get a raw pineapple and usually eat ju Continue reading >>

Nasty Experience With Pineapple And Orange

Nasty Experience With Pineapple And Orange

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Nasty experience with pineapple and orange Yesterday morning my bg was 5.4. I later had a small piece of pineapple and an orange on empty stomach. I later did another test to know if these fruits would spike my sugar level, Incredibly my sugar level had risen to 13. This shows me that these fruits arent good for me. Am I alone? Yesterday morning my bg was 5.4. I later had a small piece of pineapple and an orange on empty stomach. I later did another test to know if these fruits would spike my sugar level, Incredibly my sugar level had risen to 13. This shows me that these fruits arent good for me. Am I alone? I do so much miss fruit but I just stopped eating them because I had a sneaking suspicion my BG would go through the roof. Eat 5 raspberries and dream kevinfitzgerald Type 1 Well-Known Member The majority if not all fruit contain sugar. Forget the "well it's natural sugar" comment that many state. Sugar is sugar and it will have a dramatic effect on Blood Glucose levels if too much is consumed. We can eat fruit but we have to be very careful and we need to consume small portions. I am not a fruit lover but I had a smoothie once some years back and it nearly put me into a coma! Yesterday morning my bg was 5.4. I later had a small piece of pineapple and an orange on empty stomach. I later did another test to know if these fruits would spike my sugar level, Incredibly my sugar level had risen to 13. This shows me that these fruits arent good for me. Am I alone? It is generally said that tropical fruits are the worst and fruits that grow in a cold climate are the best for bg. But many, perhaps most of us can only eat very small portions even of the l Continue reading >>

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type Ii Diabetes: 6 Fruits To Help Control Your Blood Sugar

Type II Diabetes: 6 Fruits to Help Control Your Blood Sugar Controlling your diabetes could be as easy as losing weight. There are many things that you can do to control you blood sugar and increasing your intake of certain fruits is one of them. Natural sugar is easier to break down than processed or man-made sugar. This is why adding fruit, a great source for natural sugar, to your diet in moderation could prevent your body from building an insulin intolerance. Here are our favorite fruits to add to your diet if you are looking to naturally control your blood sugar, or decrease the amount of insulin that you use each day. 1. Avocado Avocado is thought by many to be a vegetable. On the contrary, it is actually a fruit. This fruit is high in monounsaturated fats which are one of the healthy fats that you should ingest on a regular basis. These fruits also improve heart health. They have a very low percentage of low-quality carbohydrates and can improve the sensitivity you have to your insulin. This means that simply snacking on avocado, eating guacamole, or adding it to a sandwich could decrease the amount of insulin that you have to take. 2. Grapefruits Grapefruits are a great source of chromium. Recent studies have shown chromium to significantly lower blood sugar levels. A grapefruit with breakfast can help break down the dietary sugars that are in your cereal as well. It also contains a very low amount of carbohydrates but most of these carbohydrates are considered healthy fiber so they won’t cause a serious increase in blood sugar. 3. Pineapples Pineapple does not prevent blood sugar spikes. However, it has a low glycemic index, which means that it raises your blood sugar slower and does not cause rapid spikes. This means that when your blood sugar starts low, it Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Top 20 Fruits For Diabetics

Some serious health conditions need extra precaution when it comes to our eating habits. One such disease, diabetes, restricts us from eating certain types of food. From watching our sugar intake to controlling the consumption of refined carbohydrates, precautions could help in reducing the risk factor of diabetes, which could even lead to some types of cancer. Quite many people believe that diabetics cannot eat certain fruits. According to the guidelines by nutritionists and medical institutions, it is important for everyone to have at least 4 to 5 fruits servings in a day. Considering the fact that a person who is suffering from diabetes, should have controlled sugar level, there is no need for them to avoid fruits to keep their blood sugar level controlled. They just need to be extra careful when eating certain kind of fruits such as bananas, litchis, custard apples and mud apples. Eat them but in limited quantity. Here we have listed top 20 fruits that can be eaten by diabetics... Pears Rich in vitamins and fibre, this delicious food is one of the healthier snacking options for diabetics. Papaya Another 'super-food' for diabetics is papaya. Papaya contains essentials minerals and vitamins, hence, can be eaten by people suffering from diabetes. Starfruit Somewhat similar to jamuns, starfruit is another option for diabetics. It controls your blood sugar level but in case a person has diabetes nephropathy, starfruit should be avoided. Guava Guava is good for controlling blood sugar and also prevents constipation. Loaded with vitamin A and C, they also contain high dietary fibre. Kiwi fruit You could include kiwi in your diet. Many researchers have proved that eating kiwis could actually help you in lowering your blood sugar levels. Black Jamun This fruit is one of the Continue reading >>

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