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Are Oranges Safe For Diabetics?

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Best 15 Fruits For Diabetics

Which are the best fruits for diabetics? This is the common question which arises in the minds of the diabetics as many of them believe that they can”t eat fruits as all fruits contain high sugar content. But there are lots of healthy fruits for diabetics which do not increase the blood glucose level and these fruits for diabetics could be said to be best fruits for diabetics. Fruits having these two characteristics are particularly beneficial fruits for diabetic patients: Low Glycemic Index -Fruits with low Glycemic Index(GI) are good for people with diabetes. Glycemic Index describes the effect of carbohydrates present in food materials on our blood glucose levels. Fruits with low GI will produce small change in our blood glucose and levels of insulin. Low GI fruits release the glucose slowly into the blood which avoids the sudden rise in blood glucose levels. This is an important factor in diabetes management. High Fiber content -Fruits especially rich in fiber are good fruits for diabetics as they have a low glycemic index. Fibers present in these fruits slow down the absorption rate of sugar in the bloodstream. Hence these are good fruits for diabetes. List of Best Fruits for Diabetics The healthy fruits for diabetics are listed below: -Called as a “diabetes superfood” by American Diabetes Association blueberries help the body to efficiently process blood glucose for energy. Blueberries have low calorie content which also helps in weight loss and losing belly fat. Fruits for diabetes increase the sensitivity towards insulin and help in managing blood glucose levels. -Grapefruits help in weight loss and this in turn helps to reduce insulin resistance. A study has found that consuming grapefruit could help in diabetes treatment. Scientists have found that an an Continue reading >>

Oranges.....good Or Bad ?

Oranges.....good Or Bad ?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Hi, I have taken to eating oranges again, after not eating them for years, after I had gout and doctor advised giving them a miss......are oranges good or bad for someone with type 2, controlled with metformin ?.........Del. Oranges are tropical fruits which are very high in sugar, the only way to see if you are tolerating them is to test your bs before and after eating one which is what I myself am about to do. I can't resist them & they are at their best just now. Beware: oranges bananas, pineapple, grapes magoes, peaches necterines plums etc I don't currentley test myself........what is the best way to do that ? I don't currentley test myself........what is the best way to do that ? Well, first you will need a meter. The most popular one that people here use seems to be the SD Codefree which is available from Home Health online, delivery is free and arrives within a few days. For around 12.99 you get a meter, about five test strips and lancets, (so best to also order strips 6.99 and lancets 5 lancets last ages as you can multiuse. ) all three items come in a zipped case and homehealth is the cheapest retailer. When you test you are aiming to keep your bs between 4.5 & 8.5 You will learn which foods affect your levels then you can adjust your diet accordingly O.k, Thanks for that, I have never self tested.......I did mention it to diabetic nurse once, but she seemed to brush it off, as though I didn't need to do it very often, and said that was why I went to see her.........but I only go once a year.......when I was in hospital they tested 3 times a day........Del. Not testing is a myth because the health service originally from government to save m Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Candy Not only do high-sugar foods like candy, cookies, syrup, and soda lack nutritional value, but these low-quality carbohydrates also cause a dramatic spike in blood sugar levels and can contribute to weight gain, both of which can worsen diabetes complications. Learn to satisfy your sweet tooth by snacking on high-quality carbohydrates such as fresh fruit. Apples, berries, pears, grapes, and oranges all have sweet, juicy flavors and are packed with fiber to help slow the absorption of glucose, making them a much better choice for blood sugar control. When snacking on fruit, pair it with a protein food, such as a string cheese, nonfat yogurt, or handful of nuts, to further reduce the impact on your blood sugar. (For more sweet ideas, see my list of 20 Low-Sugar Snack ideas). Continue reading >>

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

Fruit For Diabetes – Is It Actually Safe To Eat?

If you are living with diabetes, you've probably been told to minimize or eliminate your intake of fruit because "fruit is high in sugar." And if this is the case, maybe you refrain from eating fruits because it causes your blood glucose to spike. Attracted by the smell, color and taste, you may find yourself asking a simple question: "Should I avoid fruit in the long-term? And if so, will I ever be able to eat fruit again?” It turns out that this ant-fruit message is a perfect example of pseudoscience at its best. A recent study published in PLOS medicine tracked the health of 512,891 Chinese men and women between the ages of 30 and 79 for an average of 7 years, in order to understand the effect that their diet had on their overall health (1). We like these types of studies because they are: For those who did not have diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who had a higher fruit consumption were 12% less likely to develop diabetes, compared with those who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. The researchers found a dose-response relationship, which means that the more frequently these nondiabetic individuals ate fruit, the lower the risk for developing diabetes. Amongst those living with diabetes at the beginning of the study, those who ate fruit 3 times per week reduced their risk of all-cause mortality (death from any cause) by 17%, compared with diabetic individuals who ate zero pieces of fruit per day. In addition, researchers uncovered that those who ate fresh fruit 3 days per week were 13-28% less likely to experience macrovascular complications (heart disease and stroke) and microvascular damage (kidney disease, retinopathy and neuropathy). Even though this study was observational, the results of the study have profound implications for people living with Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Oranges?

Oranges are a healthy citrus fruit, but if you have type 2 diabetes, you may worry about their high sugar content if your blood sugar levels are out of control. Fortunately, oranges contain components that make them a nutritious part of a diabetic diet as long as you eat them in concert with other healthy foods. Video of the Day People with type 2 diabetes cannot properly modulate blood sugar levels because they either don't produce enough insulin or their bodies can't effectively use the insulin they do produce. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form, making up between 90 to 95 percent of all diabetics, according to FamilyDoctor.org. The food that a type 2 diabetic eats can significantly affect blood glucose levels, so choosing the right foods is important. Fruit in a Diabetic Diet Fruit can and should be part of a diabetic's daily diet. Diabetics who eat between 1,600 and 2,000 calories per day need to eat at least three servings of fruit per day. Those consuming 1,200 to 1,600 calories need two fruit servings daily, according to the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse. The fiber, vitamins and minerals in fruit are essential to maintaining overall health. Because fruits provide carbohydrates, you usually need to pair them with a protein or fat. Oranges provide high levels of fiber, which is important for digestive health, and vitamin C, which supports the immune system. The carbohydrate count in one orange is about 10 to 15 g. For diabetics using a carbohydrate-counting system to determine how much they can eat in a day, an orange is one serving. For diabetics using the glycemic index or glycemic load of foods to plan what they eat, oranges are also a good choice. The glycemic load of an orange is about 5, a low number that indicates the fruit causes only a s Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Fruit If I Have Diabetes?

Fruit is not off-limits if you have type 2 diabetes. It has too many good things going for it, such as fiber and nutrients, as well as its natural sweetness. These fruits are good choices. Keep in mind that fruit gives you carbs, and “as with any carbohydrate, it's important to be mindful of serving sizes,” Shira Lenchewski, RD, says. Pairing fruit with some protein, such as nonfat or low-fat yogurt or a few nuts, also helps. “This super fruit literally has it all,” says Lynn A. Maarouf, RD, nutrition educator at the Stark Diabetes Center at the University of Texas Medical Branch. “It supplies enough beta-carotene and vitamin C to meet your daily requirements and is an excellent source of potassium (an antioxidant which can help lower blood pressure).” Portion Size: 1/3 of a melon Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs One serving of strawberries gives you 100% of your daily requirement of vitamin C. “Also, these sweet berries contain potassium, which help keep blood pressure down, and fiber, which makes you feel full longer while keeping blood sugar levels in check,” Maarouf says. In a recent study, people who ate strawberries along with white bread needed less insulin to steady their blood sugar, compared to people who ate just the white bread. “The research suggests it’s the polyphenols in strawberries that may slow down the digestion of simple carbohydrates, thereby requiring less insulin to normalize blood glucose,” Lenchewski says. Portion Size: 1 cup Nutritional Info: 60 calories, 15 grams of carbs These tiny tangerine hybrids are high in both vitamin C and folate, which has been shown to improve blood sugar control in people with type 2 diabetes. “They fit nicely into a backpack or briefcase, and they have a peeling that slides Continue reading >>

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

25 Best Fruits For Diabetics

Are you a diabetic? Are you worried about foods with a high glycemic index? Don’t worry. We are here to give you the best fruits that you can relish without worrying about your blood sugar levels. Would you like to know more? Keep reading! Diet For Diabetics: Diabetics do not have to eliminate all sugary foods from their regular meals. Sugar or glucose is a vital requirement for the human body. It fuels us with energy so that we can stay active all day. But when you have to deal with diabetes, it is necessary to take care of your sweet cravings in an appropriate manner. Hence, portion control is essential for every diabetic. So, what would be the best practical way to ensure diabetics get their required intake of sugar? Fruits: The Ultimate Food For Diabetics: Most would prefer a healthier and natural way, and what better way is there to go with than fruits! A quick light snack, an after meal desert, or simply blended and squeezed into a refreshing drink, fruits can be consumed in many ways. Fruits also provide us with roughage, antioxidants, vitamins and minerals. But how would fruits benefit a diabetic? Well, in addition to the various nutrients fruits give, the simple sugars or carbs in them are a whole lot easier for the body to process. Also, these are the healthier kind of sugars the body needs. Diabetes may cause weight loss, resulting in severe health adversities. Including fruits in their diet regimen can contribute towards reducing the excessive weight of many diabetics. One of the effects of diabetes is that it makes people hungry all the time, and the intake of certain fruits can create the feeling of fullness. Again, too much of anything can prove to be bad for you. Thus, when consuming fruits, a diabetic must be cautious and careful while picking the fru Continue reading >>

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Top 10 Diabetes Superfoods

Not all healthy foods are created equal. Greens may be good for you, but the nutrients in iceberg lettuce may not be as plentiful as those in kale, spinach, and Swiss chard. Besides nutrient content, the glycemic index (GI) of a food may also help you make healthy choices. The GI measures how quickly a food will raise blood sugar. Low GI foods have a score of 55 or less, while high GI foods have a score of 70 or more. In general, lower GI foods are a better choice for people with diabetes. Foods that are both nutritious and have a low GI are helpful in managing health and blood glucose levels. Here are 10 superfoods that are especially good for those with diabetes. 1. Non-Starchy Vegetables Non-starchy vegetables have fewer carbs per serving. They include everything from artichokes and asparagus to broccoli and beets. This category of veggies goes a long way in satisfying your hunger and boosting your intake of vitamins, minerals, fiber, and phytochemicals. These vegetables are also low in calories and carbohydrates, making them some of the few foods that people with diabetes can enjoy almost with abandon. In fact, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) identifies most non-starchy vegetables as low GI foods with a ranking of 55 or less. A small study of 11 people found that a low-calorie diet consisting of non-starchy vegetables may successfully reverse type 2 diabetes. 2. Non-Fat or Low-Fat Plain Milk and Yogurt Vitamin D is essential for good health. One of its roles is to keep bones healthy, yet many of us don’t get as much as we need. Non-fat dairy foods, including milk and yogurt, are fortified with vitamin D. These dairy products are smart choices for diabetics because they have low GI scores: Skim milk has a GI score of 32 while reduced fat yogurt has a GI sco Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

13 Best And Worst Foods For People With Diabetes

How to choose food If you have diabetes, watching what you eat is one of the most important things you can do to stay healthy. "The basic goal of nutrition for people with diabetes is to avoid blood sugar spikes," says Gerald Bernstein, M.D., director of the diabetes management program at Friedman Diabetes Institute, Beth Israel Medical Center in New York. Candy and soda can be dangerous for diabetics because the body absorbs these simple sugars almost instantly. But all types of carbs need to be watched, and foods high in fat—particularly unhealthy fats—are problematic as well because people with diabetes are at very high risk of heart disease, says Sandy Andrews, RD, director of education for the William Sansum Diabetes Center in Santa Barbara, Calif. Worst: White rice The more white rice you eat, the greater your risk of type 2 diabetes, according to a 2012 review. In a study of more than 350,000 people, those who ate the most white rice were at greatest risk for type 2 diabetes, and the risk increased 11% for each additional daily serving of rice. "Basically anything highly processed, fried, and made with white flour should be avoided," says Andrews. White rice and pasta can cause blood sugar spikes similar to that of sugar. Have this instead: Brown rice or wild rice. These whole grains don't cause the same blood sugar spikes thanks to fiber, which helps slow the rush of glucose into the bloodstream, says Andrews. What's more, a Harvard School of Public Health study found that two or more weekly servings of brown rice was linked to a lower diabetes risk. Worst: Blended coffees Blended coffees that are laced with syrup, sugar, whipped cream, and other toppings can have as many calories and fat grams as a milkshake, making them a poor choice for those with diabete Continue reading >>

How Coffee, Citrus And Nuts Help Cut The Risk Of Diabetes

How Coffee, Citrus And Nuts Help Cut The Risk Of Diabetes

If you go back to the 1970s, people with a serious coffee habit often had an accompanying habit: smoking. And that's why early studies gave coffee a bad rap. Clearly, smoking was harmful. And it was hard for researchers to disentangle the two habits. "So it made coffee look bad in terms of health outcomes," Harvard researcher Meir Stampfer explained to me. But fast-forward a quarter century, and the rap on coffee began to change. As we've reported, recent studies have found that people who drink coffee regularly are at lower risk of depression, and perhaps Alzheimer's too. Now, there's further evidence that coffee also helps cut the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes. In the most recent meta-analysis, researchers found that drinking two or more cups of coffee per day was associated with a 12 percent decreased risk of developing the disease. And even decaffeinated coffee seemed to cut the risk, though not as much as the caffeinated kind. Of course, the most significant risk factor for Type 2 diabetes is weight. And, indeed, the study found that coffee's protective effect didn't seem to hold up as well in overweight people. So, what explains coffee's beneficial effects on diabetes? Well, researchers say there may be several explanations. Coffee contains a host of polyphenols, beneficial plant compounds. And researchers have identified one compound, chlorogenic acid (CGA), which has been shown in studies to delay the absorption of glucose. But man cannot live on coffee alone. So what other foods may help decrease risk of Type 2 diabetes — or help people manage the condition if they've already been diagnosed? The American Diabetes Association has a list. Not surprisingly, beans and leafy greens are at the top of the list. In addition to being a cheap source of protein, be Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Oranges

Can Diabetics Eat Oranges

Lisa Rivera | August 14, 2017 | Fruits for Diabetes | No Comments If our blood sugar levels are out of control, its time to consider our diet as a means of managing our blood sugar levels. You should take a look at the GI. Fruits that come with higher GI are best avoided temporarily while you are trying to regular you blood sugar levels through diet. Oranges are fruit from the citrus family as well as one of the more popular fruits around the world. They can be incorporated into your diet in many ways as long as you dont eat too many even if you have diabetes. Foods that contain carbs include vegetables, fruits , starches etc. Most people with diabetes have to stick to eating no more than 45 to 60 grams of carbs per meal. For people with type 2 diabetes, it is critical to look at what foods are made of so that your blood sugar level can be more easily controlled. But memorizing the exact amount of carbs in all the fruits that we eat would be almost impractical and impossible. The exact amount of carbohydrates that should be eaten will vary depending on a few factors such as goals, metabolic health and physical activity levels. Carbohydrates are every bodys primary source of energy, because most of them convert into glucose. We need glucose fuel our day-to-day activities. Oranges have a number of types of carbohydrates, including fiber and a type of carb that doesnt convert into glucose or supply calories. Since you need fiber and carbohydrates for healthy digestion and energy, it is vital to meet your everyday recommendation of every type. Orange juice, as you can likely imagine, is the awesome juice squeezed from the delicious and popular citrus fruit, oranges. Obviously it is commonly considered one of the healthiest drinks due to its wide range of health benefits fo Continue reading >>

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