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Are Night Sweats Caused By Diabetes?

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

8 Causes Of Night Sweats

Doctors often hear their patients complain of night sweats. Night sweats refer to excess sweating during the night. But if your bedroom is unusually hot or you are wearing too many bedclothes, you may sweat during sleep, and this is normal. True night sweats are severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench your clothes and sheets and that are not related to an overheated environment. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or body) may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. There are many different causes of night sweats. To find the cause, a doctor must get a detailed medical history and order tests to decide if another medical condition is responsible for the night sweats. Some of the known conditions that can cause night sweats are: Menopause. The hot flashes that accompany menopause can occur at night and cause sweating. This is a very common cause of night sweats in women. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis. Idiopathic hyperhidrosis is a condition in which the body chronically produces too much sweat without any identifiable medical cause. Infections. Tuberculosis is the infection most commonly associated with night sweats. But bacterial infections, such as endocarditis (inflammation of the heart valves), osteomyelitis (inflammation in the bones), and abscesses can cause night sweats. Night sweats are also a symptom of HIV infection. Cancers. Night sweats are an early symptom of some cancers. The most common type of cancer associated with night sweats is lymphoma. However, people who have an undiagnosed cancer frequently have other symptoms as well, such as unexplained weight loss and fevers. Medications . Taking certain medications can lead to night sweats. Antidepressant medications are a common type of drug that can lead to Continue reading >>

Night Sweats: What Is Causing You To Sweat At Night?

Night Sweats: What Is Causing You To Sweat At Night?

Facts and Definition of Night Sweats Night sweats are often, but not always, associated with hot flashes that women may experience during the menopausal transition. Many other medical conditions and even certain medications can cause night sweats. True night sweats are not related to an overheated room or sleeping environment. Other symptoms can be associated with night sweats, depending on the cause. Associated symptoms can include It is important to consult a health-care professional for unexplained night sweats that do not resolve. Treatment of night sweats depends on the underlying cause of the problem. What Are Night Sweats? Night sweats refer to any excess sweating occurring during the night. If your bedroom is unusually hot or you are using too many bedclothes, you may begin to sweat during sleep - and this is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one's surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, and that are not related to an overheated environment. It is important to note that flushing (a warmth and redness of the face or trunk) also may be hard to distinguish from true night sweats. What Causes Night Sweats in Men and Women? Night sweating can arise from harmless situations or serious disease. If your bedroom is unusually hot or you are using too many bedclothes, you may begin to sweat during sleep - and this is normal. In order to distinguish night sweats that arise from medical causes from those that occur because one's surroundings are too warm, doctors generally refer to true night sweats as severe hot flashes occurring at night that can drench sleepwear and sheets, and that are not r Continue reading >>

Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Metformin Can Cause Night Sweats

Dear Dr. Roach • As a preventive measure for prediabetes, my doctor recommended I take 500 mg of metformin twice a day (morning and evening). I have been following this regimen for two months. I am a female, 58, and other than needing to lose about 20 pounds, am in good health, exercise every day and eat a healthy diet. The same day I started the medication, my night sweats started up again, with a vengeance. On the metformin, my quality of sleep was negatively affected by four to five episodes of bad hot flashes every night. Because hot flashes/night sweats were not mentioned as a side effect either by my doctor or on the information pamphlet, I notified my doctor. He suggested stopping the metformin for two to four weeks to see if the night sweats subsided. I had immediate relief with the night sweats the first day I stopped the medication. Some research indicates that metformin causes hypoglycemia, which then causes the night sweats. A sometimes-mentioned desirable side effect is weight loss. What is your take on metformin and whether it is a help or a hindrance to good health? — R.M.T. Answer • Metformin was tested in a large trial to see whether it could help prevent people at high risk for diabetes from developing overt diabetes, and it was successful at doing so. It wasn’t quite as successful as a good diet and regular exercise, but many experts do use metformin, especially in overweight people, to help them lose weight and reduce their diabetes risk. In my opinion, it works best when combined with a healthy diet and regular exercise. However, it does have side effects. Gastrointestinal side effects, especially diarrhea but also nausea, are the most common. Hot flashes are listed as occurring in 1 to 10 percent of people taking the medication, and I found Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Diabetes And Abnormal Sweating: What Is The Connection?

Many people with diabetes will experience times when they sweat too much, too little, or at odd times. Diabetes-related nervous system damage and low blood sugars cause these commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Sweating complications can be a sign of poor diabetes management. Maintaining healthy blood sugar levels is crucial to both prevention and treatment. Contents of this article: Diabetes and sweating problems People sweat for a variety of reasons. Some of these reasons are normal and some are not. Sweating is a natural response to physical and emotional stress. But excessive sweating, when the reason is unclear, is often a sign that something is not right. Some people with sweating conditions will sweat even on a cold day or during minimal activity. Low blood sugar levels and diabetes-related nervous system damage cause the most commonly experienced sweating conditions in people with diabetes. Extremely low blood sugars cause a fight-or-flight response, triggering the release of hormones that increase sweating. When blood sugar levels are too high for too long, a loss of nerve function can occur. This condition is known as diabetic neuropathy. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) claim that around half of people with diabetes experience some form of neuropathy. If the nerves that control the sweat glands are damaged, they may send the wrong message to sweat glands, or none at all. In most cases, neuropathies cause either excessive sweating or an inability to sweat. Sweating caused by hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is a term to describe abnormally low blood sugar levels. For most adults, blood glucose levels below 70 milligrams per deciliter are considered hypoglycemic. Individual targets can vary, however. Many diabetes management medica Continue reading >>

Avoiding Nighttime Lows

Avoiding Nighttime Lows

Nighttime hypoglycemia can be the result of a number of factors in people with diabetes, according to Howard Wolpert, M.D., Director of the Joslin Diabetes Center Insulin Pump Program. It’s important to learn what causes low blood glucose reactions, so you can figure out how to prevent them from happening. Causes of Nighttime Hypoglycemia Having an active day or exercising close to bedtime with diabetes can decrease your blood glucose and cause a hypoglycemic reaction during sleep. Consuming alcohol in the evening can also put you at risk for a lower blood glucose level. This is a result of your liver clearing the alcohol from your blood, instead of producing glucose. In addition, some people forget that their bolus/fast-acting insulin lasts for up to five to six hours. If you have a late dinner and go to sleep a couple hours later, your blood glucose may be normal before going to bed. However, since the insulin you took for dinner is still acting in your body, your blood glucose could drop during the night. Signs of Nighttime Hypoglycemia Signs that you’ve experienced nighttime hypoglycemia can include: Sweating: waking up with damp clothes/sheets Waking up with a headache Having nightmares You may also wake up with a higher blood glucose reading, which is a result of your body rebounding from the overnight low. Experiencing a fast heartbeat and anxiety before bed may be an indication of approaching hypoglycemia. Ways to Avoid Nighttime Hypoglycemia Your target blood glucose reading before bed should be at least 140 mg/dl, Wolpert says. Before you go to bed, consider all of the causes of nighttime hypoglycemia, and if you think you’re at risk, have a snack before heading to sleep. If you use an insulin pump, one option is to reduce your basal rate. If you find yo Continue reading >>

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

Nighttime Hypoglycemia

An episode of low blood glucose occurring at night. During sleep, the body’s energy needs fall, and consequently the liver pumps out less glucose, the body’s fuel. In people without diabetes, the pancreas responds to the liver’s lowered glucose production by secreting less insulin, and in this way, a balance is maintained. In people with Type 1 diabetes, this balance is harder to maintain since the pancreas no longer secretes insulin. Instead, a person must inject just enough insulin — but not too much — before bedtime to maintain a normal nighttime blood glucose level. A number of things can throw off the balance. Injecting too much insulin or injecting the right amount at the wrong time can lower blood glucose more than desired. Eating less food than usual during the day or eating the evening meal or snack at a different time than usual can affect blood sugar during the night. Exercising more than usual during the day can also cause low blood glucose at night. Many of the classic signs of low blood glucose — including shakiness, light-headedness, dizziness, confusion, rapid heartbeat, irritability, and extreme hunger — can occur during the day or at night. Nighttime hypoglycemia has also been known to cause night sweats, headache, restless sleep, and nightmares. Nighttime hypoglycemia is a common problem among people who control their blood glucose intensively through multiple injections of insulin during the day. In the Diabetes Control and Complications Trial, a study that evaluated the benefits and risks of “tight” blood glucose control, people on tight control regimens were three times more likely to have an episode of hypoglycemia than those on standard regimens, and more than half of these episodes occurred while people were sleeping. Although Continue reading >>

Diabetes & Sweating Issues

Diabetes & Sweating Issues

Diabetes is a chronic disease resulting from the inability of the body to correctly regulate the levels of glucose in the blood, or blood sugar levels. People with diabetes may experience symptoms in almost any organ of the body, because blood flows through the entire body. Symptoms of diabetes include various issues concerning sweating and heat regulation. Video of the Day Although diabetes is a disease caused by high levels of blood sugar, called hyperglycemia, patients with diabetes occasionally experience the opposite problem of low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia. Low blood sugar in diabetic patients is most often caused by medicines used to treat high blood sugar, but sometimes they work too well and cause blood sugar to drop to unhealthy levels. When people with diabetes experience a dip in blood sugar, the body releases epinephrine, also called adrenaline, in an attempt to raise blood sugar. In addition to the symptoms of shakiness and anxiety, epinephrine also causes the body to start sweating profusely, the National Diabetes Information Clearinghouse explains. Inability to Sweat One frequent effect of diabetes is damage to the nerves connecting the brain to the rest of the body, which is called diabetic neuropathy. If the nerves that control sweat glands are damaged, they may not be able to activate the sweat glands and produce sweat. This inability to sweat is called anhidrosis. One study published in Mayo Clinic Proceedings found that 94 percent of patients with diabetic neuropathy had abnormalities in sweating. People who cannot sweat often have trouble regulating their body temperature, because sweat helps the body to cool down. As a result, diabetic patients with anhidrosis may easily become overheated in warm temperatures or after physical exertion. Some pa Continue reading >>

Night Sweats And Diabetes – Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Night Sweats And Diabetes – Nocturnal Hypoglycemia

Do you find yourself waking at night drenched in sweat and feeling hot and clammy – even when the room is cold? You’re not alone. Night sweats are a common symptom of nocturnal hypoglycemia – the night-time low blood sugar episodes experienced by some diabetics. What causes night sweats in diabetics? The main cause of night sweats in diabetics is low blood sugar at night (hypogylcemia). When blood sugar levels drop, this can cause a number of sleep-disturbing symptoms, including headaches and excessive sweating. While night sweats can occur across the whole body, in people experiencing nocturnal hypoglycemia, the neck often becomes noticeably sweaty, making this a key sign to look out for. So what causes diabetes and night sweats? Essentially, this is anything that could cause glucose levels to drop overnight. Some of the most common causes include: Insulin use: Hypoglycemia is more common in diabetics who use insulin to manage their condition. Exercise: Being more active means you’ll have used more glucose during the day. In particular, exercising in the hours before bed increases the chances of low blood sugar at night. Alcohol: Drinking alcohol in the hours before bed can decrease your liver’s ability to produce glucose overnight. Dealing with low blood sugar and night sweats For the most part, dealing with diabetic night sweats means making sure that you manage your condition to reduce the risk of experiencing hypoglycemia at night. The following tips can help: Test your glucose levels before bed: If levels are already on the low side, you can take preventative action before going to sleep. Watch what you eat in the evening: Avoid wine, beer or other alcoholic drinks in the hours before bed Increase snacking if you’ve been more physically active during t Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes: Is Sweating Normal?

Diabetes and Excessive Sweating While many people can experience difficulties with sweating, it can also be an issue for people with diabetes. There are three main types of sweating that you may experience. They are: hyperhidrosis: excessive sweating not caused by temperature or exercise gustatory sweating: caused by food and limited to face and neck areas night sweats: caused by low blood glucose during the night Each of these have different types of treatments. Your doctor can recommend the best treatment to help relieve or stop your excessive sweating. However, since sweating can be a sign of other more serious conditions, you should always talk to your doctor if you experience this type of sweating. Hyperhidrosis Hyperhidrosis is the term for excessive sweating. This is sweating that is not from exercising or the temperature. This can occur when your blood glucose gets too low (hypoglycemia). It will trigger a fight or flight response from your body. You produce excess adrenaline and norepinephrine, which cause excess sweating. Once your blood sugar returns to normal, the sweating should stop. If, along with sweating, you have bladder control problems or an unusual heart rate, it could indicate autonomic neuropathy. This is caused by damage to the nerves that control functions like the bladder, blood pressure, and sweating. Excessive sweating can also occur with obesity. Obesity often accompanies diabetes. However, these are not the only ways diabetes and excessive sweating can be connected. Gustatory Sweating Gustatory sweating is different than hyperhidrosis. It is also not unique to people with diabetes. However, people with diabetic autonomic neuropathy are more likely to experience this than those without nerve damage. Luckily, it is easy to identify. If you br Continue reading >>

Night Sweats And Diabetes

Night Sweats And Diabetes

One of the possible causes night sweats is diabetes. Night sweats and diabetes can affect men, women or children; it’s not discriminant. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it’s likely that you have suffered from night sweats on at least one occasion, possibly accompanied by other disturbing sensations like weakness, heart palpitations, dizziness, hunger or anxiety. Low blood sugar, or hypoglycemia, may be causing these symptoms. Nighttime hypoglycemia and night sweats go hand and hand but there are a few things you can do to stabilize your blood sugar while you sleep and in turn help reduce your chances of experiencing that uncomfortable sweating at night that can be caused by changes in blood sugar levels. The Link Between Night Sweats and Diabetes There are a number of reasons why a person with either type 1 or type 2 diabetes might experience low blood sugar at night that leads to sweating while sleeping. When we sleep, our bodies require less fuel so the liver produces less sugar. In people without diabetes, the pancreas responds by producing less insulin and everything stays in balance. For individuals with diabetes, the pancreas either doesn’t produce enough insulin or produces no insulin at all, requiring individuals to inject insulin to control blood sugar levels. However, injecting too much insulin or changing the quantities or timing of meals can throw off blood sugar levels. When blood sugar drops to the mid 60’s, the nervous system reacts in a number of ways. One of those reactions is sweating, either as traditional night sweats or cold sweats at night. Sweating can also be accompanied by trembling, hunger, weakness or fatigue and a sense of nervousness or anxiety. These symptoms are important to note as it is your body’s way of signaling you t Continue reading >>

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

8 Ways To Prevent Night Sweats

Do you ever wake up drenched in sweat in the middle of the night—even if the thermostat is turned low? Try these diabetes-friendly ways to prevent night sweats. If you’ve ever awakened a few hours after drifting off to sleep, wrapped in damp sheets and dripping with sweat, you know how disruptive it can be to a good night’s rest. Why might your body’s own thermostat be going haywire? “Night sweats are usually related to hypoglycemia, an episode of low blood sugar,” says L.A.-based diabetes educator Lori Zanini, RD. “Other signs of nighttime hypoglycemia include waking up with a headache and having nightmares,” both caused by fitful sleep. A variety of circumstances can throw your blood sugar off balance, from injecting the incorrect amount of insulin to eating or exercising differently than usual. “Focus on preventing your nighttime lows, rather than reacting to the symptoms caused by the lows,” says Zanini. Here’s how: Eat a bedtime snack. “A protein-rich snack is absorbed and processed by the liver slowly enough to ensure blood sugar remains stable throughout the night,” says Zanini. Opt for one that contains at least 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and one to two ounces of protein. Some ideas include: ¾ cup of blueberries and ½ cup low-fat cottage cheese Slice of whole-wheat, high-fiber toast with 1 to 2 tablespoons natural peanut butter One or two servings of string cheese Ask yourself: Have I been more active today? If the answer is “yes,” be sure to adjust for the extra physical activity by snacking or taking less blood sugar-lowering medication to compensate for burning extra sugar. Avoid late-night drinking. Consuming alcohol in the evening can put you at risk for low blood sugar, since your liver is busy clearing the alcohol from Continue reading >>

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

7 Causes Of Excessive Perspiration In People With Diabetes

Unless the weather is sweltering or you’re having hot flashes, excessive sweating is most likely an indication of a greater health issue. Ask yourself: Do you have a fever or other signs of an infection? Are you in any pain when you sweat? Is the sweating mainly on one side? Does it involve your palms, soles, and/or armpits? Do you sweat while you sleep? Is your blood glucose level high (or low) during these sweating episodes? Could sweating be a reaction to your diabetes medication? If the answer is yes to any of these questions, talk to your healthcare provider. What are the possible causes of excessive sweating? For people with diabetes, certain complications can affect the sweat glands, making it difficult for the body to cool down in hot weather, triggering heavy sweating even during light activities, or causing sweating in cool temperatures. 1. Autonomic neuropathy. This is a condition in which hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) interferes with the nerves that control involuntary functions. The autonomic nervous system manages several systems automatically, including bladder control, heart rate, the ability to detect hypoglycemia, and the ability to sweat appropriately. Dry feet are a common symptom of nerve disease, so it is important to inspect your feet daily to be sure there are no cracks from excessive dryness, a condition that tends to occur along with sweating. 2. Low blood glucose levels. A low blood glucose level is called hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia triggers a fight-or-flight response in the body. As a result, the body produces additional norepinephrine and adrenaline, which can lead to heavy sweating as well as shakiness and anxiety. Good diabetes management can help keep your blood glucose levels in check. 3. Heart problems. People with diabetes have Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Night Sweats

Diabetes And Night Sweats

Waking up at night feeling shivery and drenched in sweat is not an unusual occurrence if you suffer from diabetes. Even when the weather is cool you can find yourself clammy and unable to sleep comfortably. You’re not alone – almost half of Americans are now thought to suffer with diabetes or pre-diabetes – so we thought we’d shed some light on the link between diabetes and night sweats, and what you can do to lessen the effects and get a better night’s sleep. People with diabetes often suffer night sweats due to low blood sugar levels, or hypoglycemia at night. A drop in blood glucose can cause all sorts of symptoms, including headaches and severe sweating. These symptoms of nocturnal hypoglycemia can result in disturbed sleep due to discomfort and damp bedding, and will likely mean you feel less than refreshed in the morning. So what causes nocturnal hypoglycemia and diabetic night sweats? There are a number of things you may not realize can cause your blood glucose levels to fall during the night. Did you know that if you enjoy a glass of wine or beer before bed, you may be stopping your liver functioning to produce glucose overnight? If you’ve ever woken up in a cold sweat after a night out – this is the cause! Exercising lots during the day can mean you use up your body’s stores of glucose – if you don’t replenish these before bed you could suffer from hypoglycemia at night. Did you know, if you manage your diabetes with insulin you may be more at risk of night sweats as you can’t monitor your blood glucose levels at night? Ways to combat nocturnal hypoglycemia There are a few things you can try to reduce the risk of suffering from low blood sugar at night. The main one being to make sure you manage your diabetes as well as you can. Aside from Continue reading >>

Night Sweats

Night Sweats

Medications that can cause night sweats Night sweats are a common side effect of many medications, such as: Depression medications (antidepressants) Hormone-blocking drugs used to treat certain cancers (hormone therapy) Drugs used to treat diabetes (if the level of sugar in your blood gets too low) (hypoglycemic agents) Medical conditions that can cause night sweats Diseases and conditions that can cause night sweats include: Autoimmune disorders Autonomic neuropathy (damage to your autonomic nerves) Brucellosis (a bacterial infection) Carcinoid syndrome (a certain type of cancerous tumor in your intestines) Drug addiction (substance use disorder) (alcohol, opioids, cocaine, cannabis, benzodiazepines) Endocarditis (an infection of your heart valves) HIV/AIDS Hodgkin's lymphoma (Hodgkin's disease) (Hodgkin's disease) Hyperthyroidism (overactive thyroid) Myelofibrosis (a bone marrow disorder) Osteomyelitis (a bone infection) Pheochromocytoma (a rare adrenal gland tumor) Pyogenic abscess (a pus-filled cavity caused by an infection) Sleep disorders (such as obstructive sleep apnea) Syringomyelia (a fluid-filled cyst in the spinal cord) Thyroid disease Night sweats and hot flashes are very common among women around the time of menopause. If you are around age 50 and are having irregular or absent menstrual periods, and have no other symptoms, this is likely the cause of your symptoms. Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Can Diabetes Trigger Night Sweat Episodes?

Diabetes is a lifelong condition, characterized by a person having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal. There are two strands of the condition - type 1 and type 2 - and in both types, night sweat episodes may symptomize abnormally low blood glucose levels. These should always be dealt with immediately, because potential consequences range from disorientation to loss of consciousness, or even death. Read on to learn more about diabetes, how diabetes can be a night sweats trigger, and how to efficiently restore low blood sugar levels. What Is Diabetes? The pancreas gland behind the stomach produces insulin, a hormone that controls glucose levels in the blood and enables the conversion of glucose into energy for the healthy functioning of the body. Diabetics produce insufficient amounts of insulin or insulin that doesn't function properly, which means they are unable to convert glucose into energy naturally. Type 1 diabetes is usually diagnosed during childhood and is controlled by regular insulin injections to replace that which the body cannot produce; type 2 is more commonly associated with adults and obesity, and is managed with a healthy diet and tablets. Part of managing diabetes responsibly means being aware of the symptoms that indicate a change in blood sugar levels in the body. Hypoglycemia For a diabetic, night sweat episodes could be indicative of hypoglycemia. Hypoglycemia is defined as a severe lack of energy caused by abnormally low blood sugar, when glucose levels drop to between three to four millimoles per liter (mmol). Hypoglycemia can occur when a diabetic has taken too much insulin, skipped a meal, or exercised too hard without replenishing lost energy levels. During the day, feeling hungry, dizzy, and shaky are all fairly noticeable symptom Continue reading >>

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