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Are Navy Beans Good For Diabetics?

Beans Will Rock Your World

Beans Will Rock Your World

I’ve started eating a lot more beans. Why? They are healthy and cheap. They make me feel good, and it turns out they taste great if you prepare them right. Research shows that beans are even better if you have diabetes. A woman in my neighborhood got me started. We were talking about diabetes, and she said she had been diagnosed with Type 2 five years ago. But she now eats beans with every meal, and all her numbers are back to normal, including her glucose tolerance test. I figured I should look into it. Of course the first place to look is always Diabetes Self-Management‘s Amy Campbell. Here’s what she wrote in 2007: “Beans are a rich source of protein. One cup of beans contains about 16 grams of protein, the same as 2 ounces of meat or chicken. People who are vegetarians typically use beans and bean products as their main source of protein. Beans contain no cholesterol…and only about 1 gram of fat (non of it saturated, either).” That’s just the start. Amy says beans “also contains about 15 grams of [mostly-soluble] fiber…which can help lower cholesterol levels and lower the risk of heart disease…Beans are also a great source of iron, calcium, potassium, and magnesium, as well as vitamin A and folate.” That column was from five years ago. Since then, others have been shouting the praises of beans even more loudly. According to Jim Healthy, editor of the Web site My Healing Kitchen, “Beans are best for diabetes,” because “they are loaded with all-important fiber, which slows the breakdown of carbohydrates into sugars in your bloodstream, assists your body’s insulin response to glucose, and helps you burn fat faster.” They will limit the spikes in glucose levels after meals. (See last week’s blog entry “Stop Spiking Those Sugars!”) H Continue reading >>

Greek Bean And Vegetable Soup

Greek Bean And Vegetable Soup

Known in Greece as Fassoulada, this hearty, thick soup is a popular dish in that country. Navy beans, onion, tomatoes, and garlic are the essential basics of this soup. 2 3/4 cups vegetables and beans, 1 1/4 cups broth, 1 oz. bread, oz. cheese, 1 Tbsp. nuts 2 3/4 cups vegetables and beans, 1 1/4 cups broth, 1 oz. bread, oz. cheese, 1 Tbsp. nuts Choices/Exchanges: 5 Nonstarchy vegetable, 2 Starch, 1 Lean protein, 2 Fat Cooking for 2 Dinner Lunch Main Dish Quick & Easy Vegetarian High in Fiber Veggie Rich Comfort Food Mediterranean canned navy or great northern beans (no-salt-added, rinsed and drained) canned whole tomatoes (low-sodium, no-sugar-added, drained) feta cheese (reduced-fat, crumbled, about 3 Tbsp.) shelled pistachios (no-salt-added, dry-roasted, coarsely chopped) Heat oil in a large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add the onion, zucchini, celery, and garlic. Cook 2 to 3 minutes, until vegetables soften. Add vegetable broth, water, beans, and tomatoes. Break up the tomatoes with the edge of a cooking spoon. Bring soup to a simmer and cook 5 minutes. Add the spinach and thyme. Cook about 1 minute, until the spinach wilts. Add the black pepper. Ladle the soup into 2 bowls and sprinkle with the feta cheese and pistachio nuts. Serve bread on the side. Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

10 Diabetes Superfoods

10 Diabetes Superfoods

There's a lot of buzz these days about superfoods like aai (ah-sigh-EE) fruit juice that are supposed to improve your health. But, says the American Diabetes Association, the best foods for you are easy to find, easy to cook, and even easier to pronounce. Some, like the 10 that follow, are particularly suited for people who have diabetes because they have a low glycemic index (GI) and are packed with important nutrients. Whether you prefer kidney, pinto, navy, or black beans, you can't find a more nutritious food than beans. Their high fiber content gives you nearly one third of your daily requirement in just a half cup. Beans are also are good sources of magnesium and potassium, important nutrients for people with diabetes. Although they are considered starchy vegetables, a half cup provides as much protein as an ounce of meat without the saturated fat. Use canned varieties to save time, but rinse first to remove excess sodium. Powerhouses like spinach, collard greens, and kale are so low in calories and carbohydrates, you can eat as much as you want. Try it: Sesame Kale with Garlic and Ginger Grapefruit, oranges, lemons, and limes provide part of your daily dose of soluble fiberimportant for heart healthand vitamin C. This starchy vegetable is packed full of fiber and vitamin A (as carotenoids), important for vision health. Try these in place of regular potatoes for a lower-GI alternative. Blueberries, strawberries, and other varieties are packed with antioxidants, vitamins, and fiber. Make a parfait by alternating the fruit with nonfat yogurt. Everyone can find a favorite with this old standby. No matter how you like your tomatoespureed, raw, or in a sauceyou're eating vital nutrients like vitamin C, iron, and vitamin E. Salmon, albacore tuna, mackerel, halibut, and Continue reading >>

Navy Beans

Navy Beans

The George Mateljan Foundation is a not-for-profit foundation with no commercial interests or advertising. Our mission is to help you eat and cook the healthiest way for optimal health. The navy bean got its current popular name because it was a staple food of the United States Navy in the early 20th century. These small white beans are perfect for making baked beans. Dry navy beans are available year-round in prepackaged containers as well as bulk bins. Canned navy beans are also available year round at local markets. Navy beans are small, pea-sized beans that are creamy white in color. They are mild-flavored beans that are dense and smooth. Like other common beans, navy beans are one of 13,000 species of the family of legumes, or plants that produce edible pods. Combined with whole grains such as rice, navy beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. Navy beans are an excellent source of cholesterol-lowering fiber, as are most other beans. In addition to lowering cholesterol, navy beans' high fiber content prevents blood sugar levels from rising too rapidly after a meal, making these beans an especially good choice for individuals with diabetes, insulin resistance or hypoglycemia. When combined with whole grains such as brown rice, navy beans provide virtually fat-free high quality protein. But this is far from all navy beans have to offer. Navy beans are a very good source of folate and manganese and a good source of protein and vitamin B1 as well as the minerals phosphorus, copper, magnesium and iron. Check a chart of the fiber content in foods and you'll see legumes leading the pack. Navy beans, like other beans, are rich in dietary fiber . Soluble fiber forms a gel-like substance in the digestive tract that combines with bile (which contains cholestero Continue reading >>

Can Beans And Rice Work In Your Diabetes Diet?

Can Beans And Rice Work In Your Diabetes Diet?

THURSDAY, April 12, 2012 — White rice and anything made with white flour are big diabetes diet "don'ts." Multiple studies have shown that as you digest these "white" foods, your body essentially treats them like sugar, which can cause a blood-sugar spike in patients with the disease and also increase a person's risk for developing diabetes. (Rice consumption is one reason diabetes rates are high among Asian populations.) Beans, meanwhile, are a complex starch that's thought to be a healthy component to most diets. Beans are high in fiber and protein, and contain essential nutrients, such as iron, zinc, and folate, as well as a compound that can inhibit the blood's ability to absorb sugar. So when you combine the good and the bad, does it add up to a diabetes-friendly dish? That's the question researchers at the Oregon Health and Science University posed in their recent study published in Nutrition Journal as part of an effort to help tailor diabetes care to cultural groups. After examining the blood glucose levels of adults with type 2 diabetes who consumed either pinto beans and white, long grain rice, black beans and white, long grain rice, red kidney beans and white, long grain rice or white, long grain rice alone, researchers found that the pairing of any type of beans with rice can help stop unhealthy blood sugar spikes. In the trial, blood glucose levels were significantly lower for the three bean and rice groups compared to the rice-only group after 90, 120, and 150 minutes. Because beans and rice are a popular food combination in the Caribbean, Latin America, the Middle East, and the Mediterranean, researchers believe this new finding can help people living with type 2 diabetes in those cultures adhere to a diet that will help them better manage their diabetes Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List

Now some of the diabetes diet information presented below may be slightly different to what you are used to seeing. That’s because there are quite a few flaws in the common diet prescription for type 2 diabetes. In our work with clients we’ve discovered that a ‘real food’ approach to eating has helped control type 2 diabetes the most. That’s because there is more to managing diabetes than just counting cabrs! So we’ve put together this type 2 diabetes diet food list that will give you a great place to start. FREE DOWNLOAD Like a Take Home Copy Of This List? Includes Snack Ideas and Food Tips! Type 2 Diabetes Diet Food List PROTEINS Every meal should contain a source of protein for energy production and to fuel the creation of new cells. Below is a list of good protein sources to choose from. Protein also helps to satisfy the appetite, keeping you fuller longer. Lean Meats Lean beef; veal, flank steak, extra lean mince, sirloin steak, chuck steak, lamb. Pork Lean cuts of pork; pork chops or loin. Poultry Chicken, turkey, duck, quail, goose. Fish Tuna, salmon, cod, trout, bass, flatfish, whitehead, mackerel, herring, eel, haddock, red snapper, trout, drum, walleye, sardines and so forth. Seafood Crab, lobster, prawns, shrimp, oysters, mussels, clams, scallops, abalone, crayfish. Game Meats Venison, wild boar, kangaroo, deer, pheasant, moose, wild turkey, alligator, emu, ostrich, elk, bison, turtle. Many people don’t eat these types of meats but you can eat them if you like them. Organ Meats Beef, pork, lamb, chicken livers. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken tongues, hearts, brains. Beef, pork, lamb, chicken marrow, kidneys. Many people don’t eat these types of meats either but you can eat them if you like them, and they are very good sources of vitamins and minera Continue reading >>

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Eat Beans For Better Blood Sugar With Diabetes

Beans sometimes get a bum rap. Truth be told, beans boast an amazing number of health benefits. If you have diabetes, beans, and other legumes can help you maintain better control of your blood sugar. What's a legume, you ask? A legume is a plant whose seeds or fruit are found in a long case, called a pod. Beans, chickpeas and lentils are common legumes. Legumes are a low glycemic index food that won't cause sudden spikes in your blood sugar. The glycemic index looks at how fast a carbohydrate-containing food, like beans, raises your blood sugar (glucose) level compared to a baseline product like white bread. Foods low on the index breakdown slowly in the body, so you don't get a sudden rush of sugar into your bloodstream. High glycemic foods (like white rice), on the other hand, get digested more quickly, which can send your blood sugar soaring. Diabetes Superfood Many diabetes nutrition guidelines recommend beans and legumes as part of a healthy diet. In fact, the American Diabetes Association includes them in their list of Diabetes Superfoods. Here's why beans and legumes are so good for you: They provide slowly digested starch (carbohydrate), which reduces blood sugar spikes. They are full of healthy fiber, so they keep you feeling full longer. They're packed with protein, which your body needs to work properly. They are low in fat. Studies show that adding 1 cup (190 grams) of legumes to your daily diet helps lower hemoglobin A1C levels. (That's your average blood sugar level for the last 2-3 months.) Some research hints that eating legumes at breakfast prevents spikes after that meal and subsequent ones that day. And legumes are also good for your heart. A daily dose of beans and legumes can lower your risk of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, and coronary ar Continue reading >>

Legumes Improve Blood Sugar Control And Reduce Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetics

Legumes Improve Blood Sugar Control And Reduce Cardiovascular Risk In Diabetics

Patients with diabetes may want to think twice when choosing between whole wheat foods and legumes, like beans, chickpeas, and lentils. For patients with diabetes, controlling blood sugar levels is extremely important. Out of control blood sugar levels can lead to serious health problems and sometimes, like with a heart attack, stroke or kidney failure, the damage can’t be undone. Fortunately, there are many ways that diabetics can help control their blood sugar, like through exercise, weight control and diet. And a new study shows that incorporating more legumes into the diet could not only help control blood sugar levels but also reduce cardiovascular risk in patients with type 2 diabetes. This study was published recently in the Archives of Internal Medicine – a peer-reviewed medical journal published by the American Medical Association. Through this study, researchers assigned more than 120 patients with type 2 diabetes to one of two diets. Half of participants were instructed to eat at least 1 cup of legumes, like beans, chickpeas and lentils, a day, while the other half were instructed to eat more whole wheat products. After following patients for 3 months on these diets, researchers found that patients increasing their consumption of legumes had significantly better blood sugar control than patients who increased their intake of whole wheat products. And as mentioned earlier, increased legume intake was also associated with lower blood pressure and cardiovascular risk compared to increased intake of whole wheat products. So what’s the difference between legumes and whole wheat products? The good news is that both are packed with insoluble fiber, which is known to have many health benefits like lowering blood pressure and helping with blood sugar control. Bu Continue reading >>

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Beans

What You Should Know About Diabetes And Beans

Beans are a diabetes super food. The American Diabetes Association advises people with diabetes to add dried beans or no-sodium canned beans to several meals each week. They are low on the glycemic index and can help manage blood sugar levels better than many other starchy foods. Beans also contain protein and fiber, making them a healthy two-for-one nutritional component to every meal. With so many types of beans available, there is bound to be one that suits your palette. Learn more about understanding the glycemic index here. Benefits of beans When planning your meals, remember that 1/3 cup of cooked beans is considered one starch diabetic exchange. One diabetic exchange of beans provides about 80 calories and about 15 grams of carbohydrates. If using the beans as a replacement for animal protein, the serving size or diabetic exchange is 1/2 cup. For every half-cup of beans, make sure to account for one very lean protein exchange and one starch exchange. The nutritional information for beans varies slightly from bean to bean. Here’s the nutritional information, 1/3 cup each, for some beans you may want to try: Type Black beans Lima beans Red kidney beans Calories 75 60 73 Protein (g) 5 3 5 Carbohydrates (g) 13 11 12 Fiber (g) 5 3 4 Beans are a good alternative to meat because of their high protein content. Unlike meat, beans have no saturated fat and ample fiber, which makes them a healthy exchange. When looking at exchange lists, beans are usually grouped with starches such as breads and potatoes. But remember that beans tend to be much higher in protein and fiber than other starchy foods. Beans also provide significant soluble fiber, which feeds healthy gut bacteria and results in improved gut health and reduced insulin resistance in animal studies. More research Continue reading >>

Which Beans Are Good For Diabetics?

Which Beans Are Good For Diabetics?

Certain foods are particularly healthy for diabetics because they help balance blood sugar levels and reduce the risk of related disorders, such as heart disease. Beans contain high amounts of dietary fiber, the part of a plant food that the body cannot digest or absorb. All beans contain soluble fiber, which dissolves in water to form a gel-like substance that helps reduce cholesterol and glucose. This fiber is found in several types of beans. Video of the Day The deep, rich color of black beans is due to substances called anthocyanin flavonoids, which are powerful antioxidants that help cleanse the body of toxins and repair damage to cells, according to the site Health Mad. A cup of black beans contains 15 g of fiber, more than half the recommended daily requirement of fiber. This soluble fiber helps lower cholesterol and stabilize blood sugar levels for better diabetes control. Black beans also contain the mineral molybdenum and vitamin B6 or folate, an important nutrient for pregnant women and for protection against heart disease. Lima beans are also healthy for people with diabetes because they contain high amounts of fiber for digestive and colon health. This fiber-rich food helps your body control weight and stabilize blood glucose levels. Lima beans are good sources of the minerals manganese, magnesium and iron, which play important roles in energy metabolism and bone health. Manganese is also important for breaking down dietary fats, protein and carbohydrates. Lima beans also contain protein and carbohydrates and have few calories, little sodium and no saturated fat, according to nutritional info on the Peer Trainer website. Kidney beans are reddish brown and commonly used in dishes such as chili, rice and soups. This type of bean is healthy in a diabetic meal Continue reading >>

Diabetic Diets What Not To Eat, And What To Eat

Diabetic Diets What Not To Eat, And What To Eat

Visit our Health Index for More Subjects, Conditions and Answers Diabetic Diets What causes the high blood sugar levels in Type 2 Diabetes? High blood sugar levels are caused by insulin resistance, and insulin resistance is caused mainly by a diet that is too high in carbohydrates and a lack of certain nutrients. Carbohydrates are simply long chains of sugar molecules (glucose) hooked end-to-end. When you eat carbohydrates your normal digestive process breaks up these chains into the individual sugar molecules, and they pass right through your intestinal wall into your bloodstream, and load up your bloodstream with sugar. If this happened every once in a while it would not be a problem. But as diets today are so high in carbohydrates, you have had a constant high level of sugar pouring into your bloodstream year after year! This requires your body to continuously produce high levels of insulin to keep that blood sugar level down. (Insulin's job is to push sugar out of the bloodstream into the cells where it is used for energy.) Eventually the cells in your body became insensitive to the effects of the insulin (insulin resistance). To handle this problem of insulin resistance your body began to produce even higher levels of insulin. This continued until your pancreas reached the maximum amount of insulin it could produce, and when the insulin resistance increased again, your blood sugar began to rise out of control. The result is type 2 diabetes! (Type 2 diabetes is actually an extreme case of insulin resistance.) What can you do? If you have not already done so, you need to eliminate ALL the starchy carbohydrates from your diet and stop loading up your body with sugar. Even small amounts of these starchy carbohydrates will prevent your sugar levels from coming down. Thi Continue reading >>

The Diabetic Diet: Good For Everyone (diabetic Or Not!)

The Diabetic Diet: Good For Everyone (diabetic Or Not!)

If you’ve been diagnosed with any type of diabetes, you are usually taught to eat a specific diet. The diabetic diet encourage minimizing the blood sugar spikes that occur throughout the day. But why wait until you have diabetes to follow these rules? Taking preventative measures now will greatly reduce your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, and eating like a diabetic is a great way to start. Let’s break down the diabetic diet strategies and learn why we should all be eating this way now - instead of waiting until we have to. Read more about symptoms of diabetes to watch out for 1. Increase Fiber Intake Diabetics are encouraged to get more fiber into their diets to help with stabilizing blood sugar levels. Fiber is also excellent for optimal digestion and elimination. Fiber is something we all need and few of us are actually getting enough of it. Many people think if they have a bowl of cereal in the morning that they are getting their daily fiber intake. The truth is, getting fiber from a processed cereal grain is not the best source. The best source of fiber is from whole foods: beans, lentils, fruits, vegetables (peels!) and 100 percent whole grains. Top food sources of fiber include turnip greens, mustard greens, collard greens, navy beans, eggplant, raspberries, and cinnamon. Sugar in any form needs to be strictly watched on a diabetic diet, especially if you’re insulin dependent. This is the main cause of a rise in blood sugar levels. The thing is not to eliminate your carbohydrates altogether (as with the case with the popular Atkins diet) but to make better choices. Choose carbohydrates that will gradually raise your blood sugar levels instead of quickly spiking them. Recognizing the bad sources of carbohydrates and replacing them with a healthier option Continue reading >>

Say Yes To Beans!

Say Yes To Beans!

Amy Campbell is a registered dietitian and Certified Diabetes Educator who has been working in the field of diabetes for many years. She is the author of several books about diabetes, including 16 Myths of a Diabetic Diet and Staying Healthy with Diabetes: Nutrition and Meal Planning. In addition, Amy is a lecturer and frequent contributor to several diabetes-related websites. Of all the foods to get excited about, beans are probably not on the top of your list. But maybe they should be. Beans are way up there in terms of foods that provide a number of health benefits. In fact, many health experts recommend that we aim to eat at least three cups per week. Read on and learn why beans should be a staple in your kitchen. Beans defined There are all types of beans out there, and while most beans are healthful (with the exception of jelly beans, perhaps), the beans that pack a nutritional punch belong to the legume family. Legumes are a class of vegetables that include lentils, peas, and beans. Examples of beans that are legumes are kidney beans, black beans, pinto beans, garbanzo beans (aka “chickpeas”), cannellini beans, lima beans, and soybeans. And there are many more. Beans have quite a past, too. For example, there’s evidence of fava beans, chickpeas and lentils in Egyptian tombs from 4,000 years ago. In 1500 BC, farmers in parts of Asia were growing and using soybeans. And Native Americans and early Mexicans cultivated runner beans, kidney beans, and lima beans. In fact, beans have been and still are a major part of world agriculture, and are a staple of many different cultures’ diets. Beans help your health Beans are low in fat and saturated fat, but are rich in a number of nutrients, such as fiber, protein, B vitamins, iron, potassium, and phytonutrients. Th Continue reading >>

Baked Navy Beans | Diabetic Living Online

Baked Navy Beans | Diabetic Living Online

Rinse beans. In a 4-quart Dutch oven, combine beans and the 8 cups water. Cover and let soak in a cool place for 6 to 8 hours or overnight. (Or bring bean mixture to boiling; reduce heat. Simmer for 2 minutes. Remove from heat. Cover and let stand for 1 hour.) Rinse and drain beans. In the same Dutch oven, cook onion and garlic in hot oil until tender, stirring occasionally. Add beans, chicken broth, and the 3 cups water. Bring to boiling; reduce heat. Cover and simmer over low heat for 1 to 1-1/2 hours or until beans are tender, stirring occasionally. Drain beans, reserving cooking liquid. Meanwhile, preheat oven to 300 degrees F. Return drained beans to Dutch oven. Stir in 2 cups of the reserved cooking liquid, the molasses, ketchup, peanut butter, brown sugar, mustard, and Worcestershire sauce. Bake, covered, about 2-1/2 hours or until desired consistency, stirring occasionally. Makes 12 (1/2-cup) servings. *Sugar Substitutes: Choose from Sweet 'N Low Brown or Sugar Twin Granulated Brown. Follow package directions to use product amount equivalent to 2 tablespoons brown sugar. *Sugar Substitutes: PER SERVING WITH SUBSTITUTE: same as above, except 203 cal., 251 mg sodium, 33 g carbo. Exchanges: 2 starch. Carb choices: 2. PER SERVING: 211 cal., 4 g total fat (1 g sat. fat), 252 mg sodium, 36 g carb. (10 g fiber), 11 g pro. Continue reading >>

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