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Are Lemons And Limes Good For Diabetics?

Lemon For Diabetes

Lemon For Diabetes

Lemon is an oval shaped citrus fruit that is used in many cuisines worldwide for its flavor. Lemon is rich in nutrients having high levels of vitamin C, thiamine, calcium and phosphorus. Lemon is good for diabetics and has many other health benefits. Diabetes is a disease that is on the increase the world over. It is caused when the body either cannot manufacture insulin or when it is unable to utilize the insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that is secreted by the pancreas and is necessary to convert glucose into energy. Type 1 diabetes occurs when the pancreas is damaged and cannot manufacture any insulin. People with type 1 diabetes are dependent upon insulin injections to convert glucose into energy. Type 2 diabetes occurs when the insulin manufactured by the pancreas is insufficient and the body doesn’t respond to its action in the appropriate manner. Since the body cannot convert glucose to energy, blood sugar levels increase and this can cause a lot of harm. A majority of diabetics tend to develop heart disease and kidney disease. In fact the major cause of deaths amongst diabetics is due to heart attacks. For diabetics, controlling blood sugar levels is of critical importance. Diet and exercise play a big role in helping to regulate blood sugar levels. Since many diabetics tend to be overweight, losing weight and then keeping off the extra pounds is an important aspect of diabetes management. Lemon water is good for diabetics as a means of controlling blood sugar levels. Lemon juice is good for diabetics mainly because of its high concentration of vitamin C. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that helps boost the body’s immune system and has a beneficial effect on heart health. It helps to control cholesterol levels, thereby protecting the arteries fr Continue reading >>

The Benefits Of Lemons On Blood Sugar

The Benefits Of Lemons On Blood Sugar

The American Diabetes Association lists citrus fruits, including lemons, as a top 10 diabetic superfood. Lemons are best known for their vitamin C content, but their fiber and acidity also slow digestion, causing a steadier rise in blood sugar levels. By getting key nutrients through foods rather than supplementation, you have a better chance of improving your blood sugar. It’s easy to get in the habit of adding this tasty and inexpensive food to your dietary regimen. Video of the Day Carbohydrates are macronutrients found in grains, beans, vegetables and dairy foods. Your body breaks down carbohydrates into a simple sugar called glucose, which is then transported to the cells of your body. All carbohydrates, whether pasta or soda, are made up of sugar molecules, but they affect your blood sugar levels differently. How quickly a carbohydrate-containing food increases your blood sugar depends on the sugar molecules present and the rate at which you digest them. The glycemic index is a scale that compares how rapidly a food increases your blood sugar. A variety of factors affect a food's glycemic index, such as acid. Lemon juice is acidic, and it slows how quickly your stomach empties food so your body takes longer to break apart sugar molecules, causing a steadier rise in blood sugar levels. For examples, sprinkle lemon juice on white rice to lower the GI of the rice, or drink lemon water with your meal. One to two tablespoons of lemon juice may reduce the impact of a meal on your blood sugar by as much as 30 percent, according to an article in "Reader's Digest." Lemons are on the American Diabetes Association’s superfood list because of their soluble fiber content. Fiber is a carbohydrate, but your body can’t break it down so it does not impact your blood sugar le Continue reading >>

Lemon/ Lime And Type 2 Diabetes

Lemon/ Lime And Type 2 Diabetes

blood vessel health in diabetics and may help prevent cancer and cardiovascular problems. Limonoids: These compounds, found in citrus fruits, can help fight mouth, skin, colon, breast, lung, and stomach cancer. Research on Lemon/Lime and Type 2 Diabetes Dont throw away the peel! One interesting study found that citrus peel extract may have the ability to prevent the development of both obesity and type 2 diabetes. Naringen, a flavonoid that exists in high concentrations in citrus fruits like lemons and limes, has been found to have similar beneficial effects as the medication Naringen also has antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, and lipid-lowering effects. It may also have the power to ameliorate diabetic kidney disease natures medicine is truly amazing! nobiletin has been found to prevent cardiovascular disease (CVD) in diabetic animals by inhibiting oxidative stress. pectin found in citrus fruits has also been found to have several anti-diabetic effects including improved glucose tolerance and blood lipid levels, and a reduction in insulin resistance. Yet another compound found in citrus fruits, citronellol, also has hypoglycemic effects lower blood glucose, A1c and insulin levels. Lemon and lime peels contain large amounts of a naturally-occurring substance called oxalate, which can contribute to kidney stone formation in some people. Consuming large amounts of the acid present in lemons and limes can also lead to gastrointestinal distress in some people. Lemons and limes are some of the absolute best fruits for diabetics to eat! They contain so many antioxidant rich, anti-inflammatory compounds that can be extremely beneficial in warding off diabetic complications. Of course, like any fruits, they are sources of carbohydrates, so they should be eaten in moderation. Mos Continue reading >>

Can I Get You Something To Drink?

Can I Get You Something To Drink?

If you have diabetes, you know it’s important to watch what you eat—but don’t let solid food steal the limelight! Beverages high in sugar and carbohydrates are just as guilty of affecting your weight and blood glucose levels. Thirsty? Here are some tips to sip by. ——————– What should I avoid? Duck drinks like regular soda, fruit punch, fruit drinks, energy drinks, sweet tea and other beverages high in sugar. These will raise blood glucose and can provide several hundred calories in just one serving. See for yourself: One 12-ounce can of regular soda has about 150 calories and 40 grams of carbohydrate. This is the same amount of carbohydrate in 10 teaspoons of sugar. One cup of fruit punch and other sugary fruit drinks has about 100 calories (or more) and 30 grams of carbohydrate. Sick of plain water? Water is always a healthy and easy option, but we know it can be a bit boring sometimes. Luckily, there are healthy alternatives you can reach for when you’re thirsty. You can try making H2O more exciting by adding a dash of lemon or lime juice, or even low-calorie flavored drink mixes. These are convenient to have around, come in a variety of flavors and usually have less than five grams of carbohydrate per serving. Ever heard of infused water? Even better than a splash of lemon or lime, put water in the fridge with cucumbers, strawberries or fresh mint and you’ll be amazed at how refreshing it tastes. Unsweetened tea and coffee are other low-calorie, low-carbohydrate options. Most diet drinks (like diet soda or diet lemonade) have zero grams of carbohydrate per serving, so they won’t raise blood glucose on their own. What better time than summer to start sipping on a new and refreshing drink with some zing! Milk and juice While it’s usually bes Continue reading >>

Curbing Cancer, Diabetes With Lime Extracts

Curbing Cancer, Diabetes With Lime Extracts

Curbing Cancer, Diabetes With Lime Extracts Naturally, lime comes in a small shape, but its smallness does not undermine its potency, as studies have found that lime juice has high antimicrobial activity, anti-malarial, anti-inflammatory, anti-diabetes, and anti-cancer properties. According to a study titled, Evaluation of the antimicrobial properties of different parts of Citrus Aurantifolia (Lime Fruit) as used locally, published in the African Journal of Traditional, Complementary and Alternative Medicine (AJTCAM), lime juice is found to be very potent in the treatment of infectious diseases and other ailments, when used alone and in combination with other herbs. Furthermore, the American Diabetes Association has advised diabetics to frequently add lime juice to their water as a way of getting a refreshing drink which will not increase their blood sugar level. Scientifically known as Citrus Aurantifolia, lime is a popular plan t in West Africa, particularly in Nigeria. The Yorubas call it osan wewe; easterners refer to it as ugiri, while the Hausas know it as babban leemuu. Aside from empirical studies, lime has been locally used in south-western Nigeria for as far back as the existence of traditional medicine, and its the major content of the well-known herbal concoction in Yoruba land called epa-ijebu, made from the burnt juice and rind of the fruit. A study which was conducted by scientists in the Department of Pharmacognosy, College of Medicine, University of Lagos, Nigeria, attested to the efficacy of lime when used locally with other substances. When added to sugar and palm oil or honey, the juice has been found to be an excellent cough relieving mixture. The rind is burnt in some homes to act as insecticides against mosquitoes. The mesocarp is also used as a Continue reading >>

A Guide To Using Lemons As A Folk Remedy

A Guide To Using Lemons As A Folk Remedy

Lemons have a long history as a folk remedy for type 2 diabetes. But is there any truth to the claim that lemon has curative properties? Lemons have definite benefits for people with diabetes but are not a cure-all. Nutrition of Lemons Lemons have as much vitamin C as an orange. For that reason, they and other citrus fruits were taken on long sea voyages to help prevent scurvy, which is a disease that results from a vitamin C deficiency. Lemons also have a third the amount of sugar as oranges, although both citrus fruits have the same amounts of carbohydrates. Lemons and Diabetes The American Diabetes Association includes lemons on their list of superfoods due to soluble fiber and the high amount of vitamin C. Both soluble fiber and vitamin C can benefit people with diabetes. Lemons also have a low glycemic index, and some studies show that lemon may lower the glycemic index of other foods. When it comes to research on the benefit of eating lemon for diabetes, there is very little to back it up. A 2015 meta-analysis in Primary Care Diabetes found that eating citrus fruits did not seem to lower the risk of type 2 diabetes. Citrus fruits do contain flavonoids, naringin, and naringenin, that have anti-inflammatory, antioxidant effects, according to a 2014 study in Advances in Nutrition. However, there is still not a whole lot of research into these compounds and their use in treating diabetes. Fiber and Vitamin C There are two components in lemons that are definite benefits if you have diabetes: soluble fiber and vitamin C. High-fiber diets have been shown to reduce blood sugar. Soluble fiber can also help lower heart disease risk by helping to lower blood pressure and cholesterol and help with weight loss. Vitamin C is a powerful antioxidant that reduces free radical dama Continue reading >>

Adding Lemon To Water To Cure Diabetes

Adding Lemon To Water To Cure Diabetes

When I was in Singapore, I met a man about 50 years old who told me that he used to suffer from diabetes. But now, his blood sugar level is normal for few years- and so he took it as a sign that his diabetes has been cured. What he did was that he squeezed a little lemon juice into his daily drinking water and drank as per normal. He tried that after someone told him about the remedy. The type of lemon he used was the Australian green lemon (but for illustration, I only have the yellow lemons below): 3 Foods to Throw Out Cut a bit of belly bloat each day, by avoiding these 3 foods nucific.com You need not squeeze so much of lemon till the water is very sour. Just something that you can comfortably drink. This man shared with me that he had gotten a number of his family members to drink this and it seemed to help them too (he has a strong family history of diabetes on both his and his wife’s side). Lemon is a great fruit for detox- squeezing a little lemon into a glass of warm water and drinking it first thing in the morning on an empty stomach work wonders. You may find a lot of ailments that are tied to a sluggish digestive track seemed to go off. Even problems like sinus, fatigue, constipation and certain skin allergies would improve after taking a mid diluted glass of warm lemon water on an empty stomach. Give it at least 15 minutes before you take your breakfast. It would also strengthen those with weak kidneys. And please use real freshly cut lemons– not the bottled lemon juice that contains sugar that would make it worse. However, if you are undergoing treatment for diabetes, kidney or digestive track problems, please check with your doctor if the above remedy is safe to use before you apply. Continue reading >>

Lemons, Limes And Diabetes

Lemons, Limes And Diabetes

Kathryn Gilhuly is a wellness coach based in San Diego. She helps doctors, nurses and other professionals implement lifestyle changes that focus on a healthy diet and exercise. Gilhuly holds a Master of Science in health, nutrition and exercise from North Dakota State University. The soluble fiber in lemons and limes makes them healthy choices on a diabetes diet. Lemons and limes belong to the citrus fruit family. This makes them diabetes superfoods, according to the American Diabetes Association. Citrus fruits are well-known for having a high vitamin C content, but the high levels of soluble fiber in lemons and limes offer those with diabetes the most benefits. The soluble fiber found in the peels, juice and pulp of lemons and limes might help you better manage your diabetes health. Soluble fiber might help stabilize your blood glucose levels by helping to slow down your bodys absorption of sugar into your bloodstream. Soluble fiber might also help lower your blood pressure and reduce your low-density lipoprotein, or "bad" LDL cholesterol. In addition, soluble fiber might help reduce inflammation of your blood vessels. Diabetes increases your risk of suffering from heart disease, high blood pressure and stroke. The best recipes that involve lemons include the skin, juice and pulp of the fruit. Try preparing a lemon vinaigrette dressing for your salads. Use fresh lemon juice with pulp, lemon zest, vinegar, olive oil and pepper, or try preparing a lemon dill sauce for salmon. This recipe calls for fresh lemon juice with pulp, lemon zest, dill, low-fat plain yogurt and egg whites. Simple, everyday options include adding fresh lemon juice with pulp and lemon zest to ice water, iced tea, low-fat cottage cheese or low-fat plain yogurt. Look for recipes that include the juic Continue reading >>

Lemon Water And Diabetes, Really?

Lemon Water And Diabetes, Really?

Lemon is a popular fruit that is used for a number of illnesses. It is interesting to note that all the components of this fruit are used to heal us. The peel and the juice are both used for medicinal uses. Wait a bit, what about the leaves of the plant? Yes, best tea ever. So, What is Lemon used for? Cold/Flu Scurvy Inflammation (swelling and pain) Kidney Stones Better functioning blood vessels Reduce water retention High blood pressure High Cholesterol Weight loss Vitamin C, enough or not The lemon fruit is rich in vitamin C, having the same amount as an orange. It is worth noting that an orange has more sugar than a lemon, but the same amount of carbohydrate. Soluble Fibre What are the connections between lemon water and diabetes? Be patient, I am getting to that point now. Remember that a high-fiber diet is the best eating plan for persons with diabetes and lemon is a high fiber fruit. It is called a soluble fiber fruit. This high fiber fruit also lowers your blood pressure and your cholesterol. What does this have to do with diabetes? The longer your glucose reading remain uncontrolled, the more like it is that you will eventually also be told that you are suffering from high cholesterol and high blood pressure. “Misery like company.” No Man is an Island, No Man Stands Alone… Diabetes is rarely seen alone. She loves the company of high blood pressure, high cholesterol, blurred vision, nerve pain and a host of other company. Most of her company gets invited into your “home” if you do not take the necessary actions. Lemon water and diabetes cannot keep company for long and since it is a fruit, what do you have to lose? Fasting Blood Sugar Have you ever been to see the doctor and get really annoyed when he/she writes up the lab request for you to do the fast Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

What Are The Benefits Of Lemons & Limes?

What Are The Benefits Of Lemons & Limes?

Lemons and limes are low in calories, fat free and rich in vitamin C. Do Lemons Provide Vitamin C Like Oranges Do? Lemons and limes are closely related citrus fruits. According to Julia F. Morton in "Fruits of Warm Climates," the Tahiti lime, the variety most widely consumed in the United States, is presumed to have been a hybrid cross between the lemon and the Mexican lime. Lemons and limes are similar in caloric content, with about 30 calories per 100 grams, or a 1/2-cup serving, but their vitamin content differs. Although lemons and limes are too sour for most people to eat by themselves, they add flavor and nutrients to many popular recipes throughout the world today. Nearly every species of animal is able to convert glucose to ascorbic acid, or vitamin C, but humans and guinea pigs lack the enzyme needed for this conversion and must get it from food. Most people get enough of this nutrient today, but those whose vitamin C levels become critically low can develop a deficiency called scurvy, a condition that plagued sailors in prior centuries. During Portuguese explorer Ferdinand Magellan's 16th-century voyage, more than half the crew died of scurvy, and the problem continued until the 1800s, when doctors began to discover that citrus fruits prevented the disease. Acidic fruit, such as lemons and limes, may protect people from foodborne illness, according to researchers who studied the diets of people in West Africa after a 1994 cholera epidemic. In a "Tropical Medicine and International Health" paper they published in 2000, they reported that people who consumed sauces containing lime juice experienced a lower incidence of food-borne illness than those who did not. The researchers believe that the lime may stop bacteria from growing in the food. Lemon juice has 1.4 Continue reading >>

A Bit Of Lemon May Help To Control Diabetes

A Bit Of Lemon May Help To Control Diabetes

Nutrients found in lemon zest, specifically polyphenols, can help improve insulin resistance. Lemon zest is often used as garnish or to add a hint of flavor, but recent chatter has included lemon zest in discussions about diabetes control. A key ingredient found in lemon peels is polyphenols, which plays a major role in minimizing insulin resistance. An increase in insulin resistance leads to less responsiveness from the insulin hormone, resulting in uncontrolled levels of blood sugar. However, polyphenols has the ability to suppress the accumulation of fat in the abdominal area. In addition, the presence of naringin and hesperidin, bioflavonoids, function as dietary antioxidants, which have been shown in mice studies to prevent the progression of hyperglycemia. They do this by increasing hepatic glycolysis and glycogen concentration, while lowering hepatic gluconeogenesis. While lemon zest may contain key ingredients in helping one manage their blood glucose levels, the magic lies in the peel. Similar claims have also been made for orange peels. A deeper evaluation of the skin contents shows that key ingredients, flavanones, are found in all citrus peels. Since the peel is separated into different layers, similar to the human skin, the amount of flavones in each layer also varies. The white part of the skin, the albedo, has been shown to contain a larger amount of flavones compared to other layers of the peel. In addition to controlling blood glucose, the antioxidant properties of the flavones have been linked to the management of radical damage and inflammation, both of which are prevalent in type 2 diabetes. Glycation, the process of binding a sugar molecule, produces end products known as glycation end products (AGEs). Accumulations of AGEs result in browning, or in Continue reading >>

Why Diabetics Need Lemons Every Day

Why Diabetics Need Lemons Every Day

Diabetics need lemons and limes. Added to your diet every day, they are real medicine for diabetes. In a quarter cup of fresh squeezed lemon juice you get 46% of the minimum daily requirement of vitamin C, the powerhouse that boosts your immune system. It is best to get your C from fresh sources because supplements have been shown to worsen arthritis in large doses. You are not likely to overdose on C from fresh fruit. Also, since fresh lemons and limes are whole fruits, they are full of things that help us in multiple ways. Diabetics need lemons because they are packages of antioxidant, anti-cancer and antibiotic power. Besides vitamin C, lemons and limes make limonin glucoside. This molecule attaches itself to sugar, which sends it through your digestion at super speed. Then it breaks off from the sugar, leaving limonin. This cancer fighter remains active for 24 hours, a remarkable feat. Most cancer-fighting antioxidants break down in less than 6 hours. Another amazing fact: limonin protects against polyarthritis. Studies on limonin are very recent, so our understanding of the power of lemons is just beginning. Around the house lemons and limes have hundreds of uses that have nothing to do with eating them. Those are fascinating, but diabetics need lemons and limes for other reasons. You probably know that squeezed onto potatoes and avocadoes, lemon juice stops the oxidation process that turns them brown. Soaking in cold water and lemon juice causes wilted greens to crisp again. Recent news says that lime juice squeezed into cooked rice helped to stop the spread of cholera. Beyond all of that, lemons and limes have power we can use as diabetics. Diabetics need lemons in the form of warm lemon water every morning. Here is why. Lemon juice stimulates digestion, which re Continue reading >>

Lemon And Diabetes

Lemon And Diabetes

Introduction Is lemon the miracle cure for diabetes? I sincerely doubt it. However, once I decided to look into "lemons and diabetes," I was surprised by what I found. Diabetes or no, the benefits of the little, lowly lemon are amazing. This research started because my 90-year-old father-in-law has diabetes. He lost a leg this past April, and we've been researching ways to help him control his diabetes—especially since he now suffers from congestive heart failure, as well. Dietary requirements are strict for both conditions, so we wanted to do the right thing. I came across an article asking "is lemon good for diabetics?" and I was off and running. Contains Vitamins C and B Contains small levels of Vitamin A Contains proteins and minerals Helps with calcium absorption Used as a gargle can help fight sore throat Can help with respiratory problems Can be applied to burns to reduce burning sensation Low in calories Contains some iron, copper, potassium, and calcium Lemon Introduction Our lowly lemon is not so lowly after all. Apparently the lemon began in the Himalayan foothills and spread out from there, finally reaching America. One of the smallest citrus fruits, the other being lime, it grows on an evergreen tree. The lemon tree originally grew from ten to twelve feet in height but can now grow as high as twenty-two feet. Fruits take from six to eight months to ripen. Fresh picked fruit can be stored for several weeks at cool temperatures. Once a lemon is picked, it stops ripening so it is important to pick it at the right time. Some lemons are juicier than others you say? Well, it is said ripe lemons will sometimes become easier to juice when they have been sitting for a while. I'm not attesting to this fact as I'm not a lemon expert. Hints on getting lemon juice out Continue reading >>

Sugar And Carbs: Which Fruits Contain The Most/least?

Sugar And Carbs: Which Fruits Contain The Most/least?

There’s a long-running debate about fruit. Should people with diabetes eat it? If so, how much? The short answer is: Yes, a bit. Fruit is full of vitamins and minerals. It provides nutrition that’s essential for anybody, diabetic or not. Don’t leave fruit out of your diet altogether. That said, fruit tends to be quite high in sugar. Too much, and you may find it difficult to keep blood glucose levels under control. But which are the best (and the worst) fruits for people with diabetes, in terms of sugar? Let’s take a look. (Next to the sugar content, we’ve listed the total carb content of each fruit, per 100g. In this case, total carbs includes sugar, but also some other stuff.) The most sugary 5. Banana: 12g per 100g. (22.8g total carbohydrate) Bananas are pretty high in sugar content. They contain 12g of sugar per 100g of fruit. The average banana weighs roughly 120g, so people with diabetes probably shouldn’t eat more than one a day. More positively, bananas contain a whole host of good stuff: vitamin C, potassium, protein, magnesium and dietary fibre. 4. Pomegranate: 14g per 100g. (17.1g total carbohydrate) Pomegranates contain 14g of sugar per 100g, but don’t let that put you off too much. 100g of pomegranates also contains 7g of fibre, 3g of protein, and 30 per cent of the recommended daily amount of vitamin C. Just don’t eat too much. 3. Mango: 14g per 100g. (17g total carbohydrate) The average mango weighs around 200g, so one whole mango contains about 28g of sugar. Despite its health benefits – one mango contains all of the vitamin C you need in a day – you might consider avoiding mango if you struggle to control your blood glucose levels. In short: moderate your mango. 100g of grapes contains 16g of sugar. That’s about 10 red grapes. Grap Continue reading >>

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