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Are Graham Crackers Good For Diabetics

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

Bedtime Snacks For Diabetics

Diabetics need to be extra careful about what they eat and how much they eat. However, that does not mean that everything they eat has to be boring and tasteless. True, they need to keep a watch on the level of glucose in their blood, but that can be done even by enjoying tasty meals. A snack before bedtime is a habit and an advice that most diabetics follow. This Buzzle article will enumerate some snack options that diabetics can try out at bedtime. They're simple, easy to make, and most important of all, delicious! Things Diabetics can Munch on Before Going to Bed The maintenance of the level of glucose in the blood is done by the intake of suitable foods. Many diabetics are advised to indulge in a healthy snack before going to bed. This is done mostly as a precautionary measure to ensure that the level of glucose does not fall low at nighttime. In this section, we have some healthy snacks for those who need to nibble on a little something before retiring for the night. They are a combination of the most widely prescribed bedtime nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, and fats, in descending quantities. Fruit Salad Have an assortment of fruits cut up and decorated in a beautiful platter. The best one to have is apples. So have a whole apple cut up, together with some strawberries, blueberries, pomegranates, plums, etc. They are not only a rich source of vitamins and fiber, but they also help to cleanse the body by detoxifying. You can add a dollop of sugar-free vanilla ice-cream to the fruit salad to give it a more festive appeal. Cereal Now for one of the most standard snacks to have before going to sleep. You'll need low-fat milk and a cereal of your choice. Heat the milk till it is lukewarm. Then, add the cereal and eat it before you sleep. You can also keep the milk Continue reading >>

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

Diabetic Snacks: What To Eat And What To Skip

"Don't eat between meals." That's one piece of advice diabetics might want to take with a grain of salt. If you go more than four or five hours between meals, a mid-afternoon snack might be just what the doctor ordered to help you keep your blood sugar steady. Snacking is also important if you're taking medication that could cause a blood-sugar low between meals. Discuss with your doctor or a registered dietitian what snacking approach is right for you. Keep your snacks to 150 calories or less The danger of snacks is that they can become more like extra meals if you go overboard. First, make sure you're truly hungry—and not just bored or stressed or craving chocolate—before reaching for a snack. Then limit yourself to 150 calories per snack. (Cutting calories is easier than you think.) This will help keep your snacking "honest." After all, it's hard to find a candy bar with only 150 calories. And if you're hankering for a candy bar, but a healthier snack doesn't appeal, you're probably not truly hungry. Beware of low-fat snacks Studies show that people tend to eat about 28 percent more of a snack when it's low-fat because they think they're saving on calories. But low-fat snacks, such as cookies, only have about 11 percent fewer calories than their full-fat counterparts. Stick to the same amount you'd eat if you thought the snack was full-fat. Need more snack ideas? Check out these delicious snacks for adults. Check the ingredients Avoid heavily processed crackers and chips. If the list of ingredients is long and has big words with lots of syllables, put it back on the shelf. Stay away from these worst eating habits for diabetics. Watch those carbs Carbohydrates are major culprits when it comes to raising blood sugar (though there are some good carbs for diabetes). Continue reading >>

Snacks: A Healthy Necessity In A Diabetic Diet

Snacks: A Healthy Necessity In A Diabetic Diet

Snacks play a very important role in the daily life of a person with diabetes, particularly those with type 1 diabetes and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes. For these people, between-meal and bedtime snacks are essential to keep blood glucose levels as close to normal as possible and to help prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). Wherever you go you should always carry a supply of snacks to eat in case of low blood sugar (low blood glucose)—we keep snacks in our purse or briefcase, in the glove compartment of our car, in our office desk drawer, and in the sports bag that we carry to the gym. Here's a list of snacks that can be purchased at most supermarkets. The serving suggestions supply 12 to 15 grams of carbohydrate or 1 carbohydrate (1 bread/starch) exchange: 1 small apple 8 animal crackers 4 medium fresh apricots or 7 dried halves 1/2 of a banana rolled with 2 tablespoons Grape Nuts cereal 1 cup cubed cantaloupe 12 Bing cherries 2 chocolate mousse bars (Weight Watchers) 1/2 cup chow mein noodles 3 dried dates 2 small dried figs 2 sugar-free fudgesickles 3 gingersnaps 36 Goldfish (adds 1 fat exchange) 3 graham crackers (2 1/2-inch square) 1/2 low-fat granola bar 15 grapes 5 kumquats 3 Lorna Doones (adds 1 fat exchange) 12 loquats 5 slices melba toast 1 small nectarine 1 cup skim milk 3 thin sliced Norwegian Kavli flatbread (2 thick sliced) 1 small orange 1 small peach 3 peanut butter sandwich crackers (adds 1 fat exchange) 1 small pear 2 small plums 24 oyster crackers 3 cups popcorn (popped by hot air, or low-fat microwave) 3 dried pitted prunes 15 fat-free potato or tortilla chips 2 tablespoons raisins 2 rice cakes (4" diameter) 7 Ritz crackers (adds 1 fat exchange) 6 saltine crackers Stella d'Oro Sesame Breadsticks (adds 1 fat exchange) 1 tangerine 15 Teddy Gr Continue reading >>

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

15 Best Snack Foods For Diabetics

Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United States who have been diagnosed with diabetes? The options may seem even more limited. That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts. Click here to see the 15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics Slideshow Lori Kenyon is a certified nutritional consultant, personal trainer, and co-founder of Ritual Cleanse. She was diagnosed early on in her life with a disorder that prevented her from consuming animal protein and has since had to adapt her diet to compensate. Kenyon advises clients to consume snacks which contain no more than 20 grams of carbohydrates and 140 milligrams of sodium per serving, in accordance with American Diabetes Association guidelines. Stella Metsovas is a certified clinical nutritionist who specializes in food science and human nutrition, with more than 23 years of experience in the field. She is a strong believer in the Paleo-Mediterranean diet and runs a private practice in Los Angeles. Angela Shelf Medearis is the author of The Kitchen Diva's Diabetic Cookbook and has been featured frequently on The Dr. Oz Show as a guest chef, where she is known simply as The Kitchen Diva. She offers some great general snacking advice from her cookbook: Portion sizes are key. Keeping the glycemic load down (a measurement of how much food spikes blood glucose levels) means cutting down on portion sizes, since the measurement accounts for the number of grams of carbohydrates per serving of a food item, which of course will increase with portion sizes. Eating huge portions of even healthy snacks can quickly turn them unhealthy. Snacks between meals can help you re Continue reading >>

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Late-night Eating: Ok If You Have Diabetes?

Are late-night snacks a no-no for people who have diabetes? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. If you have diabetes, late-night snacks aren't necessarily off-limits — but it's important to make wise choices. Late-night snacks add extra calories, which can lead to weight gain. And if you snack after your evening meal — especially if the foods contain carbohydrates — you may wake up the next morning with a high blood sugar level. If you're hungry after dinner, choose a "free" food, such as: One sugar-free frozen cream pop Five baby carrots One cup of light popcorn A small handful of goldfish-style crackers A can of diet soda Or swap the snack for a piece of gum or small hard candy. These "free" foods have few, if any, carbohydrates and calories, so they won't contribute to weight gain or increased blood sugar. If you take insulin or other diabetes medications and feel that you must snack before bedtime to prevent low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) during the night, talk to your doctor. He or she may recommend adjusting the dose of your medications to prevent the need for a late-night snack. Continue reading >>

Healthy Snacks For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy Snacks For People With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes

Share: Snack is not a “four-letter” word. Snacks are important in the daily life of a person with diabetes, particularly those with type 1 diabetes and insulin-requiring type 2 diabetes. If there are more than four or five hours between meals, the person runs the risk of low blood sugar, and getting so hungry that he overeats at the next meal. Between-meal and bedtime snacks are essential to keep glucose tablets, wherever they go, particularly when driving or exercising. The best snacks are healthy, convenient and carbohydrate-controlled. Healthy means higher in fiber, low fat, less salt, and no or very little sugar. Convenient snacks do not have to be refrigerated, like snack bars and packaged snacks. Most important is the amount of carbohydrate the snack offers - a serving, or choice, is about 15 grams of carbohydrate. Your meal plan may designate the amount of carbohydrate for snacks. To slow the rise of blood sugar, and keep you full longer, you can include some healthy protein with your snack. Here are some tips in selecting your snacks: · Do not eat right out of the bag - count out your allowed serving, put the food items on a plate, and enjoy. There are single serving raisins, pretzels and other snack foods to help us with portion control. · Look for fresh snacks in the produce department - baby carrots, fresh fruit. · All crackers, bread and English muffins should be whole grain. · Watch the calories while you control the carbs. A snack should be about 150-200 calories. · Select nutrition bars carefully. Granola type bars are high in sugar and low in protein. Find bars that are more balanced - with 7 or more grams of protein. There are handy nutrition bars designed for diabetes that slow the rise of blood sugar with special formulations. (Extend Bars, G Continue reading >>

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

11 Foods To Avoid With Diabetes

Eating the wrong foods can mess with your blood sugar. By Franziska Spritzler, RD, CDE Diabetes is a chronic disease that has reached epidemic proportions among adults and children worldwide. Uncontrolled diabetes has many serious consequences, including heart disease, kidney disease, blindness and other complications. Prediabetes has also been linked to these conditions. Importantly, eating the wrong foods can raise your blood sugar and insulin levels and promote inflammation, which may increase your risk of disease. This article lists 11 foods that people with diabetes or prediabetes should avoid. Why Does Carb Intake Matter for People With Diabetes? Carbs, protein and fat are the macronutrients that provide your body with energy. Of these three, carbs have the greatest effect on your blood sugar by far. This is because they are broken down into sugar, or glucose, and absorbed into your bloodstream. Carbs include starches, sugar and fiber. However, fiber isn’t digested and absorbed by your body in the same way other carbs are, so it doesn’t raise your blood sugar. Subtracting fiber from the total carbs in a food will give you its digestible or “net” carb content. For instance, if a cup of mixed vegetables contains 10 grams of carbs and 4 grams of fiber, its net carb count is 6 grams. When people with diabetes consume too many carbs at a time, their blood sugar levels can rise to dangerously high levels. Over time, high levels can damage your body’s nerves and blood vessels, which may set the stage for heart disease, kidney disease and other serious health conditions. Maintaining a low carb intake can help prevent blood sugar spikes and greatly reduce the risk of diabetes complications. Therefore, it’s important to avoid the foods listed below. 1. Sugar-Swe Continue reading >>

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

5 Healthy Snacks For People With (or Without!) Diabetes

Yes, you can snack if you have diabetes When your stomach starts to rumble, you need a snack that can curb your hunger without blowing your blood sugar. Just like meals, snacks should be a combination of fat, protein, and carbohydrates. Aim for one that consists of 15 to 30 grams of carbohydrates and 100 to 200 calories (depending on your meal plan and medication). Here are five that typically get a seal of approval from diabetes educators and nutritionists. Whole-grain crackers, grapes, and cottage cheese Nutrient-rich whole grains like cracked wheat, whole wheat, rye, and quinoa can lower blood sugar and cholesterol. The cottage cheese adds protein to stabilize blood sugar, curb hunger pangs, and provide calcium for strong bones. Buy your favorite whole-grain crackers, and make sure that the first ingredient is whole-wheat flour or another whole grain, such as rye. (Even if the ingredient list says "wheat flour," it is not a whole-grain food unless it specifies "whole-wheat flour.") Arrange on a small plate 2 crackers, 1/4 cup nonfat cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Serving size: 2 crackers, 1/4 cup cottage cheese, and 1/4 cup grapes. Nutritional information—Calories: 138, Total Carbohydrate: 21.2 g (7%), Dietary Fiber: 1.5 g (6%), Sugars 11.9 g Homemade popcorn Popcorn is high in fiber, and when made from scratch is an all-natural food without additives and artificial flavorings. Pour 1 tablespoon of mild-flavored oil such as canola into a heavy-bottomed medium-large pot. Cover the bottom of the pot with 1/2 cup of popcorn kernels spread in a thin layer. (If the kernels are too crowded, not all of them will pop.) Cover the pot and heat on medium, shaking the pot every minute or so until all of the kernels have popped. Take care not to cook too long, which could Continue reading >>

7 Simple And Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

7 Simple And Healthy Snacks For Diabetics

Snacking is a pretty common thing we all do. You can snack healthy or you can snack … not so healthy. You should definitely lean toward healthy snacking, in all cases, but especially when you’re trying to identify healthy snacks for diabetics. We’re here to help you with some quick and easy snack ideas. We know our post’s title says these are snacks for diabetics, but you could definitely benefit from these snack ideas, even if you aren’t diabetic. Search Diabetic Medication Prices 7 Healthy Snacks for Diabetics Grapes on Graham Crackers If you’re looking for a sweet treat that’s not too sweet, but is easy to put together, grapes and graham crackers, with cream cheese is a tasty idea that can help curb your appetite. Ingredients: 1 tablespoon light cream cheese 2 graham cracker squares ¼ cup of halved grapes Plain Greek Yogurt with Fruit & Nuts One of the main benefits of Greek yogurt is the protein. A trick to keeping yogurt healthy is to add fruit. Make sure you buy plain Greek yogurt, then add fruit to it. Greek yogurt, on its own, can be a little tough to eat, but by adding fruit, its acidity is balanced out and is much more enjoyable. Ingredients: 1 six ounce carton of plain Greek yogurt (make sure the sugar content is low) 1 tablespoon fruit of your choice 1 tablespoon slivered almonds Pears and cheese go really well together. With 24% of your daily fiber in each pear and 20% of your daily calcium in string cheese, this snack can really boost your nutrition levels. Ingredients: 1 pear (sliced) 1 stick of string cheese Veggies & Hummus This is a nice and healthy snack, though be cautious with the hummus – it’s calorie-dense! Hummus is rich in protein and can help balance blood sugar levels. Ingredients: 1/3 cup hummus A handful of your choice of Continue reading >>

Are Graham Crackers A Healthy Snack Or Cookie In Disguise?

Are Graham Crackers A Healthy Snack Or Cookie In Disguise?

Are Graham Crackers a Healthy Snack or Cookie in Disguise? Yes! The Graham cracker is a healthy snackthat is if you are talking about the original Graham cracker invented by Sylvester Graham . Unfortunately, the answer to this question is not as clear cut as you might think.There are several factors that go into deciding whether or not something is healthy. The current Graham cracker, while still containing some of the original Graham Flour that it was once known for, is not quite as nutritious or bland as the first Graham cracker was intended to be. The Graham cracker was initially created to be a part of a high fiber vegetarian diet called the Graham Diet . So, are the modern day Graham crackers still fairly healthy or have we turned this once healthy and pious snack into a dessert? Lets take a look at some interesting facts and then decide. For those who like a little history, you will find it fascinating that some of our most popular modern day breakfasts came about because of a religious effort hoping to change the way people ate in order to help reduce sexual urges. During the 1800s, a traditional breakfast consisted of eggs, ham, sausages, fried potatoes, biscuits, pancakes and coffee. These foods were thought by some including Sylvester Graham, to be too rich and high in fat, which is what eventually led to the invention of the Graham cracker as well as dry cereal. Sylvester Graham, and those who followed his teachings, believed that a diet that was high in fat, meat, refined flour as well as ones that did not include enough fiber could cause impure thoughts and increase sexual behaviors such as masturbation. The Graham cracker was created in the mid 1800s to be a healthy snack option that, when eaten as part of Sylvester Grahams vegetarian diet plan, would hel Continue reading >>

Are Graham Crackers Okay For Diabetics

Are Graham Crackers Okay For Diabetics

= = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = =========> Download Link are graham crackers okay for diabetics = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = = Diabetic Living's dietitians scoured the supermarkets to find the most nutritious packaged snacks, and a panel of taste-testers (including people with diabetes) ranked the treats. From chips and dip to cookies and popcorn, see which snacks were awarded the Diabetic Living What to. I absolutely love graham crackers, but can't figure out if they're okay on a d diet. Also does anyone know of a substitute for brown sugar? Graham crackers can also a healthy snack for diabetics. For people who suffer from diabetes and who really need to watch the amount of sugar in their diet, Graham crackers topped with peanut butter can make a healthy snack that is satisfying and filling at the same time. Figuring out the right snack foods in between meals is hard enough for most people, but what if you're one of the 18.8 million people in the United... That's why we've put together a list of 15 diabetic-friendly snacking options based on advice from a few experts. Click here to see the 15 Best Snack Foods for Diabetics Slideshow. Lori Kenyon is a certified. This can keep you feeling energized and in a good mood as you go about your day. To help control. A low-carb diet limits your daily carbohydrate consumption to fewer than 150 grams. Some very low-carb plans limit you to fewer than 30 grams per day. Usually, starchy and sweet foods, such as graham crackers, are off the menu. Foods good for low-carb diets include proteins, healthy fats and watery, fibrous vegetables. When choosing a starchy snack, people with diabetes should be careful about the serving size. One star Continue reading >>

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

10 Best Type 2 Diabetes Snacks

Healthy Combinations Ready in Minutes When you have type 2 diabetes, a smart strategy for controlling your blood sugar levels is to think of snacks as miniature versions of meals and plan your carbs accordingly. Snacks with a good mix of protein, fat, and fiber will help keep hunger at bay and your blood sugar on an even keel throughout the day. "Since a meal should include 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates, a snack should have around 15 to 20 grams," says Katherine Basbaum, MS, RD, a clinical dietitian in the Cardiology and Cardiac Rehabilitation departments at University of Virginia Health System in Charlottesville. By the same token, she says, fill your snack plate the same way you would for a regular meal. That means half should be non-starchy vegetables, one-quarter should be lean protein, and one-quarter a starchy carb. Here are 10 terrific options for healthy diabetes snacks. Continue reading >>

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

What Is A Good Evening Snack?

My mom, who has diabetes, likes having her tea and a snack before bedtime. Is eating a slice of American or cheddar cheese good for her? Continue reading >>

Can Diebetics Eat Graham Crackers And Peanut Butter? | Yahoo Answers

Can Diebetics Eat Graham Crackers And Peanut Butter? | Yahoo Answers

Can diebetics eat graham crackers and peanut butter? Are you sure that you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: Both protein and fiber help regulate blood sugar for a longer time. Graham crackers are actually a BETTER choice than saltines- Graham is whole wheat (FIBER, which helps regulate blood sugar) and saltines are white flour (which breaks down more easily to sugars, and a lot of SALT, which is worse for you in the long-term) Peanut butter (any kind, but especially the natural kind without processed sugars) is protein. My dietician told me that peanut butter is a good option because the carbs in it are complex carbs. So it will take longer for the sugars to break down. Thusly it won't cause your sugar to spike so much. Sadly as a lover of graham crackers my self I had to give them up for the most part. You can have graham crackers and peanut butter but because the crackers are so high in sugar you can only have a few. So if youre trying to loose weight what you will probably find is you can't have enough to make them worth the number of carbs youre getting. This is especially tough for diabetics that are very over weight and trying to loose the pounds. It takes a while to get you system used to smaller portions. I fight with that every day. If you or a loved one is suffering with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes or even pre-diabetes, Im about to tell you something you have n-e-v-e-r heard before... I guarantee this will be the most important report you ever read. Im going to expose a shocking secret that *will* change your life forever. Reverse Your Diabetes Today - After being a diabetic for many many years, Im extremely happy to report that thanks to your book, my blood tests are now showing that I am completely free of diabetes. Saying thank you does not seem to b Continue reading >>

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

Healthy Snack Ideas For People With Type 2 Diabetes – Small Snacks

If you have type 2 diabetes, a snack can help you manage your blood glucose levels. If your Registered Dietitian suggests that a small snack fits into your diabetes meal plan, you’ll find many healthy ideas below. What is a healthy snack? Your snack choices should be based on the four food groups in Canada’s Food Guide. The amount of carbohydrate in your snack is very important since carbohydrate-rich foods make the biggest difference to blood glucose levels. Smaller snacks should have about 15 grams of carbohydrate. This is the amount found in one slice of bread or one small apple. Carbohydrates are also found in sugary sweets like pastries, chocolate bars and candy. Because they are not very nutritious, they should be chosen less often, if at all. Here’s a good rule to remember when choosing carbohydrate-rich foods: Choose more vegetables, fruit, legumes and whole grains like oats, barley, brown rice and whole wheat. Choose fewer products that are made from sugar, white flour and white rice. The smaller snacks listed below have about 15 grams of carbohydrate each. They each have 85-150 calories. Mid-day snacks Your eating plan may include a snack in the morning or the mid-afternoon. Here are some delicious options. 1 slice whole grain bread with 10 mL (2 tsp) peanut butter 1 small orange and 175 mL (¾ cup) edamame (green soybeans in the pod) 250 mL (1 cup) latte, cappuccino, unsweetened cocoa or chai tea made with skim milk 250 mL (1 cup) cantaloupe with 125 mL (½ cup) low fat cottage cheese 15 baby carrots with 30 mL (2 tbsp) hummus On-the-go snacks These snacks can be left in your briefcase, knapsack, car or your desk drawer. They will come in handy when you have a very busy day and need to grab a quick snack. 2 whole grain rye crispbread crackers 1 single-s Continue reading >>

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