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Are Energy Drinks Bad For Diabetics

5-hour Energy Shots: Are They Safe For People With Diabetes?

5-hour Energy Shots: Are They Safe For People With Diabetes?

America is in an energy crisis. Between coffee, soda, and caffeinated foods, if it provides a jolt of energy to this sleep-deprived nation, Americans will consume it. Once a mainstay of college kids trying to power through their finals week, energy drinks are now popular among all groups of people. 5-Hour Energy is a name-brand energy drink that’s gained a national following in recent years. Its small 2-ounce bottle size makes it an attractive alternative to some drinks that weigh in at more than 16 ounces. Are 5-Hour Energy shots safe for people with diabetes? Some energy beverages on the market contain more than 20 grams of sugar. For a person trying to control their blood sugar, these drinks are off-limits. The 5-Hour Energy shot drinks are sugar-free and contain only 4 calories. For individuals watching their sugar intake or calorie consumption, this may seem ideal. People with diabetes may be interested in this energy drink for that reason. The problem with artificial sweeteners For decades, “sugar-free” items were promoted to people with metabolic syndrome and either prediabetes or diabetes. This is because they don’t affect blood sugar the way traditional sugar sources do. When a person who doesn’t have diabetes eats something with simple sugars, blood sugar levels increase and then level off slowly and evenly within two hours. When a person with diabetes eats something with simple sugars, on the other hand, their blood sugar level increases and doesn’t decrease as it should. Instead, it remains elevated. Learn more about the relationship between eating and blood sugar. It was thought that sugar-free items didn’t have the same effect on blood sugar because they contain artificial sweeteners. Recent research, however, calls that assumption into quest Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

Diabetic Energy Drinks

Diabetic Energy Drinks

One out of every five dollars spent on soft drinks is used to buy an energy drink, according to the website Market Research World. For a quick boost to your energy levels, these drinks are very alluring to the overworked and over-tired crowd. As a person with high blood sugar, you may wonder if these drinks are safe for you. While there is no particular diabetic energy drink, most brands of energy drinks offer a sugar-free version, but they may not be the best choice. Video of the Day Energy drinks have been around since the early 20th century, designed to improve health and vitality. In the 1960s, the Japanese designed a drink called Lipovitan, which contained the amino acid taurine -- one of the primary ingredients in today's energy drinks -- to help employees work through the night. In 1985, Jolt Cola was introduced as a high-caffeine energy drink. Soon after, an Austrian entrepreneur combined the two ingredients to create Red Bull. Most of the energy drinks you see on the shelves today contain caffeine or a derivative of caffeine, taurine and a mix of B vitamins to promote energy. However, neither taurine nor B vitamins give your body energy, according to a report from the University of Florida. The true energy boosters in these energy drinks come from the caffeine and the sugar. Energy drinks may not be the healthiest beverage choice to help boost energy, says the American Diabetes Association. Energy drinks raise both blood pressure and heart rate. If you have high blood sugar, you already have a higher risk of developing heart disease and do not need to compound that risk by adding an energy drink. In addition, these drinks can also cause insomnia, restlessness, dehydration, irritability and dizziness. Energy drinks are not recommended for people with diabetes un Continue reading >>

Caffeinated “energy” Drinks & Insulin Resistance Even In Non-diabetics!

Caffeinated “energy” Drinks & Insulin Resistance Even In Non-diabetics!

Don’t worry: this actually isn’t about your morning cup of coffee. As a person with diabetes, you may already know from personal experience that a cup of coffee, even without added sugars or cream, can raise your blood sugar. “For most people with diabetes, caffeine does tend to raise blood sugar levels in people with diabetes approximately 1 hour after consuming it,” explains Gary Scheiner, CDE and author of Think Like a Pancreas and Until There is a Cure. “Meanwhile, some people with diabetes seem to have no reaction at all, even to large servings of caffeine.” “The main reason caffeine spikes your blood sugar,” explains Scheiner, “is by promoting the breakdown of fat (rather than sugar) for energy and stimulating the liver’s breakdown of glycogen.” Glycogen is a form of stored energy (glucose) in the liver. But Scheiner emphasizes that small amounts of caffeine, in a few pieces of dark chocolate for example, probably have little to no impact on blood sugar levels. But when it comes to non-coffee caffeinated beverages there may be more to it, even for those without diabetes who produce plenty of their own insulin. “Energy” Drinks: Raising Blood Sugar in Non-Diabetics New research has also noticed that caffeinated “energy shots” can also cause short-term insulin resistance in non-diabetics, explains HealthDay News. In a study based in Canada, researchers found that this short-term consequence of insulin resistance may actually “lay the foundation” for the long-term development of type 2 diabetes. “Teens who downed a tiny orange bottle of 5-hour Energy — which contains no sugar but has 208 milligrams of caffeine — were not able to metabolize sugar as efficiently as when they drank a decaf version of the same drink,” explains Hea Continue reading >>

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

What Can I Drink If I Have Diabetes?

Having diabetes means that you have to be aware of everything you eat or drink. Knowing the amount of carbohydrates you ingest and how they may affect your blood sugar is crucial. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends zero-calorie or low-calorie drinks. The main reason is to prevent a spike in blood sugar. Choosing the right drinks can help you avoid unpleasant side effects, manage your symptoms, and maintain a healthy weight. Water Unsweetened tea Unsweetened coffee Sugar-free fruit juice Low-fat milk Zero- or low-calorie drinks are typically your best bet when choosing a drink. Squeeze some fresh lemon or lime juice into your drink for a refreshing, low-calorie kick. Whether you’re at home or at a restaurant, here are the most diabetes-friendly beverage options. 1. Water When it comes to hydration, water is the best option for people with diabetes. That’s because it won’t raise your blood sugar levels. High blood sugar levels can cause dehydration. Drinking enough water can help your body eliminate excess glucose through urine. Women should drink approximately 8 glasses of water each day, while men should drink about 10 glasses. If plain water doesn’t appeal to you, create some variety by: adding slices of lemon, lime, or orange adding sprigs of flavourful herbs, such as mint, basil, or lemon balm crushing a couple of fresh or frozen raspberries into your drink 2. Tea Research has shown that green tea has a positive effect on your general health. It can also help reduce your blood pressure and lower your LDL cholesterol levels. Some research suggests that drinking up to six cups a day may lower your risk of type 2 diabetes. However, more research is needed. Whether you choose green, black, or herbal tea, you should avoid sweeteners. For a refreshi Continue reading >>

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Caffeine And Diabetes: How Much Is Safe To Consume?

Navigating what you can and cannot eat and drink when you have type 2 diabetes can be tricky. Of course, there’s the obvious stuff you know is good to cut out or limit in your diet, like processed sweets and other refined carbohydrates, which can cause blood sugar levels to soar when eaten in excess. But what about those murkier diet staples, which seem to straddle the line between healthy and indulgent, but are ingrained in so many of our everyday rituals? For millions of people in various cultures around the world, caffeinated drinks are likely the sort of thing that comes to mind when we talk about food or drinks in a healthy diabetes diet that aren’t so cut-and-dried. If you’ve recently been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or have been living with the disease for a while and are seeking better blood sugar control, the subject of caffeine in a diabetes diet is a fair concern. Caffeinated Drinks for Diabetes: Are They Safe? “For people already diagnosed with type 2 diabetes, studies have shown caffeine consumption decreases insulin sensitivity and raises blood sugar levels,” says Toby Smithson, RDN, CDE, who is based in Hilton Head, South Carolina. According to a review published in April 2017 in Diabetes & Metabolic Syndrome: Clinical Research & Reviews, five out of seven trials studied found that caffeine increases blood glucose and keeps levels higher longer. That doesn’t sound good, but if you’re accustomed to having your morning java, don’t skip out on the drink just yet. Some studies suggest that other components of caffeinated coffee may offer some benefits for people with diabetes. In a study published in March 2016 in the International Journal of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences, researchers looked at coffee consumption in adults with and w Continue reading >>

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

How Does Coffee Affect Diabetes?

With diabetes, diet is of the utmost concern. What people with diabetes eat and drink directly affects their blood glucose levels. We often concentrate on food, but what people drink is just as important. For many people, the only way to get the day started is with a cup of coffee. Thankfully, recent studies have shown that drinking coffee may actually reduce the risk of getting diabetes. But what about for those who already have diabetes? Is coffee, or the caffeine in coffee, a problem for those with diabetes? Two 8-ounce cups of coffee contain about 280 milligrams of caffeine. For most young healthy adults, caffeine does not seem to make blood sugar levels higher. Even consuming up to 400 milligrams per day appears to be safe for most people. This article will take a closer look at caffeine and some of the research that has been done in this area. Diabetes and caffeine According to the American Diabetes Association in 2012, 29.1 million Americans or 9.3 percent of the population had diabetes. About 8.1 million of the 29.1 million were undiagnosed. The World Health Organization reported that the number of people with diabetes worldwide in 2014 was 422 million. Diabetes affects how the body uses sugar (glucose). The body needs glucose because it is an important energy source for certain cells and is the brain's main source of fuel. Glucose in the body comes from food and drink as well as being made by the liver. Insulin is a naturally occurring hormone in the body and helps the body to absorb glucose. People who have diabetes have too much glucose in their blood, which can cause serious health problems. Diabetes can occur due to either the pancreas not producing no or not enough insulin or the body being unable to use insulin effectively. Type 2 is the most common type Continue reading >>

Energy Drinks Cause Blood Glucose, Insulin Levels To Spike And Hinder Blood Sugar Control In Teens

Energy Drinks Cause Blood Glucose, Insulin Levels To Spike And Hinder Blood Sugar Control In Teens

A study of adolescents consuming caffeinated energy drinks has shown that such drinks can cause blood insulin levels to spike and may lead to subsequent problems bringing blood sugar levels down to normal. The study is being presented at this week’s World Diabetes Congress in Vancouver — organized by the International Diabetes Federation (IDF) — and was performed by graduate student Heidi Virtanen in the laboratory of Jane Shearer, PhD, of the University of Calgary, Canada. Virtanen says: “Results show that consumption of a caffeine-containing energy drink results in a 20-30% increase in insulin and glucose levels in response to a glucose load. Since caffeine persists in the system for four-six hours after consumption, continuous insulin resistance associated with regular caffeine-containing energy drink consumption in adolescents could contribute to increased metabolic risk in susceptible individuals later in life through persistent interference with their regular glucose metabolism.” Increased Energy Drink Consumption Harmful To Children There has been an exponential growth of the caffeine-containing energy drink market over the past 10 years. Despite a warning label stating these drinks are not recommended for ‘children’, caffeine containing energy drinks are aggressively marketed to, and increasingly consumed by, children, adolescents and young adults. Current data indicates that around 30% of adolescents regularly consume these drinks, while 50% of college-aged athletes report use. While energy drinks contain a myriad of ingredients, the primary ingredient of concern in adolescents is caffeine. Children and adolescents are smaller compared to adults, therefore they are much more likely to ingest higher amounts of caffeine per kg of body mass, especial Continue reading >>

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

What To Drink When You Have Diabetes

Your body is made up of nearly two-thirds water, so it makes sense to drink enough every day to stay hydrated and healthy. Water, tea, coffee, milk, fruit juices and smoothies all count. We also get fluid from the food we eat, especially from fruit and veg. Does it matter what we drink? Yes, particularly when it comes to fruit juices and sugary drinks – you can be having more calories and sugar than you mean to because you’re drinking them and not noticing. Five ways to stay hydrated… Water is the best all-round drink. If your family likes flavoured waters, make your own by adding a squeeze of lemon or lime, or strawberries. Children often need reminding to drink, so give them a colourful water bottle with a funky straw. Tea, coffee, chai and hot chocolate – cut back on sugar and use semi-skimmed or skimmed milk. Herbal teas can make a refreshing change and most are caffeine-free. Fruit juices (100 per cent juice) contain vitamins and minerals and 150ml provides one portion of our five a day – but remember, fruit juices only count as one portion, however much you drink. They can harm teeth, so for children, dilute with water and drink at meal times. Milk is one of the best drinks to have after sport. It’s hydrating and a good source of calcium, protein and carbohydrate. Choose skimmed or semi-skimmed milk. …and two drinks that are great for hypos Fizzy sugary drinks provide little else apart from a lot of sugar, so only use these to treat hypos. Otherwise, choose sugar-free alternatives Energy drinks – the only time when these drinks can be helpful in diabetes is when you need to get your blood glucose up quickly after a hypo. Energy drinks are high in sugar and calories. Quick quenchers Add slices of cucumber, lemon, or mint leaves to a glass of iced wa Continue reading >>

How To Make Your Beverages Diabetes-friendly

How To Make Your Beverages Diabetes-friendly

Everyday Solutions are created by Everyday Health on behalf of our partners. More Information Content in this special section was created or selected by the Everyday Health editorial team and is funded by an advertising sponsor. The content is subject to Everyday Healths editorial standards for accuracy, objectivity, and balance. The sponsor does not edit or influence the content but may suggest the general topic area. How to Make Your Beverages Diabetes-Friendly For a healthy type 2 diabetes diet, you need to count carbs and calories, and that includes beverages as well as foods. Get tips on choosing healthy drinks. One of the biggest pitfalls for a type 2 diabetes diet is washing down healthy foods with not-so-healthy beverages. With type 2 diabetes, you know you need to count your carbs and calories. But just one sugary drink can sink your best diet intentions faster than a fast-food feast. Good beverages for diabetes can still be flavorful and satisfying without the extra carbs and calories, but you need to know how to avoid unhealthy drink choices. The link between sugary beverages and diabetes is strong. In fact, for those who dont yet have type 2 diabetes, a new study suggests that eliminating sugar-sweetened beverages can lower the risk of developing diabetes significantly. The study, published in the journal Diabetologica in 2013, collected data from approximately 27,000 people in Europe and found that just one 12-ounce, sugar-sweetened beverage a day can increase the risk for type 2 diabetes by about 20 percent. Most people with diabetes know that regular soda should be avoided, but other beverages, even those marketed as healthy choices, may not be any better for blood sugar control , says Lanah J. Brennan, RD, CDE, a nutrition consultant at Reactive Nutriti Continue reading >>

Sugar-free Energy Drinks Still Cause Spike In Blood Glucose And Insulin, Linked To Diabetes, Study Finds

Sugar-free Energy Drinks Still Cause Spike In Blood Glucose And Insulin, Linked To Diabetes, Study Finds

Sugar-free energy drinks still cause spike in blood glucose and insulin, linked to diabetes, study finds IF you think youre safe drinking sugar-free energy drinks, think again the caffeine alone found in the beverages has some alarming effects. News Corp Australia NetworkDecember 3, 20159:00am How safe are energy drinks for teens?2:03 As the energy drink industry rapidly grows, so do concerns over the possible health risks for teenagers who consume the highly caffeinated drinks. /display/newscorpaustralia.com/Web/NewsNetwork/Network News/National/ CAFFEINATED energy drinks cause a 25 per cent spike in teenagers blood glucose and insulin levels even when they contain no sugar, alarming new research shows. A study to be presented to a world diabetes conference in Vancouver has found the caffeine alone in the drinks could predispose people to diabetes and heart disease. Around 30 per cent of teens and half of all young adults consume the drinks which have been associated with a handful of deaths worldwide and over 300 health events, including 128 hospitalisations in Australia. Consumption of the drinks in Australia surged fivefold in the decade to 2010 and some experts are calling for them to be banned from sale to those aged under 18. Ms Heidi Virtanen, from the University of Calgary in Canada, will tell the conference a study of caffeinated drinks in adolescents found they caused a 20-30 per cent increase in insulin and glucose levels. Groundbreaking ... The new study, found even sugarless energy drinks can predispose people to diabetes and heart disease. Picture: Supplied.Source:Supplied Since caffeine persists in the system for 4-6 hours after consumption, continuous insulin resistance associated with regular caffeine-containing energy drink consumption in adolescents Continue reading >>

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

What You Can Drink, Besides Water, When You Have Diabetes

No doubt: Water is the perfect drink. It doesn't have calories, sugar, or carbs, and it's as close as a tap. If you're after something tastier, though, you've got options. Some tempting or seemingly healthy drinks aren't great for you, but you can make swaps or easy homemade versions of many of them. These tasty treats can fit into your diabetes diet and still satisfy your cravings. 1. Chocolate Milk This treat may remind you of the school lunchroom, but it’s a good calcium-rich choice for grown-ups as well. Low-fat chocolate milk can be a good post-workout recovery drink. The bad news: Ready-made brands come packed with sugar. Try this at home: Mix 1% milk, 3 teaspoons of cocoa powder, and 2 tablespoons of the zero-calorie sweetener of your choice. It saves you 70 calories, 16 grams of carbs, and 2 grams of fat compared to 1 cup of store-bought, reduced-fat chocolate milk. 2. Sweet Tea A 16-ounce fast-food version might have up to 36 grams of carbs. That’s a lot of sugar, especially when there are carb-free choices, like sugar-free iced tea or iced tea crystals, that are just as satisfying. But you can also easily make your own: Steep tea with your favorite crushed fruit (raspberries are a good choice). Strain, chill, and then sweeten with your choice of no-calorie sugar substitute. That’s a tall glass of refreshment. 6. Hot Chocolate It’s the ultimate in decadent drinks. Coffeehouse-style versions of this classic are packed with carbs. A typical medium hot chocolate made with low-fat milk has 60 grams. Good news: You can make your own satisfying mug for less than half that. Mix 1 cup of low-fat milk with 2 squares of 70% dark chocolate, 1 teaspoon of vanilla, and a little cinnamon. Melt in a saucepan, and enjoy it for only 23 grams of carbs. It seems like a he Continue reading >>

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

What Drinks Are Good And Bad For People With Diabetes?

When a person has diabetes, insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb glucose, is either nonexistent or in short supply. A person with diabetes is unable to use insulin properly, which causes sugars to build up in the blood. Diabetes can be dangerous if it is not properly managed. Different drinks can affect blood sugar levels in a number of ways. Contents of this article: The best drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are good choices for people with diabetes. Things to look out for when choosing a drink Many drinks contain lots of sugars and carbohydrates. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. People with diabetes have different bodily needs, so there are no exact dietary rules. However, some tips can help. To make it easier to control blood sugar, it is important to: eat a balanced diet and manage the amount of carbohydrate consumed keep carbohydrate levels consistent from day to day consume managed amounts of carbohydrate, because the brain and body need some carbohydrate to function. Paying attention to food labels and nutritional facts can provide important information. Labels should state the serving size and carbohydrate content of any drink. The worst drinks for people with diabetes The following drinks are bad choices for people with diabetes. Soda and energy drinks Sodas and other sugar-sweetened beverages can increase the risk of type 2 diabetes. For people who already have diabetes, this type of drink provides large amounts of sugar and requires little digestion. Drinking sodas without healthy food can lead to large spikes in blood sugar levels. As it is important to spread carbohydrate intake out evenly, it would be Continue reading >>

A Diabetic-friendly Energy Drink

A Diabetic-friendly Energy Drink

A diabetic-friendly energy drink is the key that helped me unlock the door to weight loss and more consistent mental and physical energy. By making it possible to think more clearly the energy drink helped me to lose twenty pounds and reduce my risk for fullblown diabetes-2. Of course, most diabetics wouldn't think of drinking an energy drink. "Everyone" knows they are loaded with sugar and nerve-wracking levels of caffeine -- and this is true, for MOST of them. Most energy drinks are junk, just concocted to make the manufacturer richer, not to safely give anyone better energy, alertness, and weight loss. Just the opposite is more likely, even for the "Diet" versions (which are dangerous for several reasons, as you'll see below). What IS an energy drink, anyway? And what would be different about one that would make it a diabetic-friendly energy drink? Energy drinks are merely a mixture of one or more stimulants, some B vitamins that have been found to facilitate the cellular energy process, usually some amino acids -- especially the much-maligned Taurine -- some flavoring, some herbs that ideally serve a constructive purpose, usually one electrolyte (salt), and lots of sweetener. It is important to mentally separate the usual "junk" energy drinks that are made without much consideration of the consumers' long-term health from the few that are designed with Health, Safety, Effectiveness, and Flavor in mind. We're only going to consider the second group here. It would be irresponsible to suggest that anyone, much less a diabetic, should drink the common commercially-promoted energy drinks with 39-57 grams of simple sugars in one can. Likewise, any "zero-carb" artificially-sweetened energy drinks will not be considered here. Studies have shown that artificial sweeteners co Continue reading >>

Diabetic Who Necked Five Energy Drinks A Day Loses 8st After Doctors Warned She Could Go Blind From All The Sugar

Diabetic Who Necked Five Energy Drinks A Day Loses 8st After Doctors Warned She Could Go Blind From All The Sugar

A diabetic who was addicted to energy drinks kicked the habit and shed eight stone after doctors warned she could go blind. Victoria Stean, 24, guzzled on five energy drinks a day - consuming 69 teaspoons of sugar - for three years. By the time she was 21, her 5ft 7in frame had ballooned to 19st 7lbs and she was at risk of losing her vision to diabetic retinopathy. This is caused by high levels of glucose damaging the retina - the seeing part of the eye - and is particularly prolific among people with diabetes. Confronted with a terrifying future, she vowed to shed the weight - and save her eyesight. She slimmed down to 11st 7lbs by ditching the sugary drinks and diet and is now a svelte size 10. Victoria Stean drank five energy drinks a day and saw her weight balloon to 19 stone. It was only when she saw holiday photos of herself on holiday in Turkey in 2013 (left) she decided to change her lifestyle and slimmed down to 11 stone 7oz after ditching sugary drinks and junk food Miss Stean, an administrative assistant from Newport Pagnell, Milton Keynes, struggled with her weight since childhood. She was just nine when she was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes which meant she had to limit her sugar intake. But she ignored doctors' warnings to eat healthily and continued to binge on sugar-laden snacks and beverages. 'At 16 years old, I weighed 16st,' she said. 'Doctors diagnosed with me with retinopathy, a disease of the retina resulting in loss of vision. 'While the disease is common with diabetes sufferers, doctors warned me it had been triggered by my unhealthy diet. But I didn't listen, continuing to scoff junk food. 'At school, I received cruel comments like 'fatty' but they never fazed me.' By 17, Miss Stean said she was drinking two cans of Monster Energy drinks every d Continue reading >>

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