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Are Diabetics More Prone To Uti?

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Urinary Tract Infections In Patients With Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus: Review Of Prevalence, Diagnosis, And Management

Go to: Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a heterogeneous group of disorders characterized by variable degrees of insulin resistance, impaired insulin secretion, and increased glucose production. Patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus are at increased risk of infections, with the urinary tract being the most frequent infection site.1–4 Various impairments in the immune system,5,6 in addition to poor metabolic control of diabetes,7,8 and incomplete bladder emptying due to autonomic neuropathy9,10 may all contribute in the pathogenesis of urinary tract infections (UTI) in diabetic patients. Factors that were found to enhance the risk for UTI in diabetics include age, metabolic control, and long term complications, primarily diabetic nephropathy and cystopathy.11 The spectrum of UTI in these patients ranges from asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB) to lower UTI (cystitis), pyelonephritis, and severe urosepsis. Serious complications of UTI, such as emphysematous cystitis and pyelonephritis, renal abscesses and renal papillary necrosis, are all encountered more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in the general population.12,13 Type 2 diabetes is not only a risk factor for community-acquired UTI but also for health care-associated UTI,14 catheter-associated UTI,15 and post-renal transplant-recurrent UTI.16 In addition, these patients are more prone to have resistant pathogens as the cause of their UTI, including extended-spectrum β-lactamase-positive Enterobacteriaceae,17 fluoroquinolone-resistant uropathogens,18 carbapenem-resistant Enterobacteriaceae,19 and vancomycin-resistant Enterococci.20 Type 2 diabetes is also a risk factor for fungal UTI, mostly caused by Candida.21 Diabetes is also associated with worse outcomes of UTI, including longer hospitalizations and incre Continue reading >>

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

Sex, Urinary, And Bladder Problems Of Diabetes

What sexual problems can occur in men with diabetes? Erectile Dysfunction Erectile dysfunction is a consistent inability to have an erection firm enough for sexual intercourse. The condition includes the total inability to have an erection and the inability to sustain an erection. Estimates of the prevalence of erectile dysfunction in men with diabetes vary widely, ranging from 20 to 75 percent. Men who have diabetes are two to three times more likely to have erectile dysfunction than men who do not have diabetes. Among men with erectile dysfunction, those with diabetes may experience the problem as much as 10 to 15 years earlier than men without diabetes. Research suggests that erectile dysfunction may be an early marker of diabetes, particularly in men ages 45 and younger. In addition to diabetes, other major causes of erectile dysfunction include high blood pressure, kidney disease, alcohol abuse, and blood vessel disease. Erectile dysfunction may also occur because of the side effects of medications, psychological factors, smoking, and hormonal deficiencies. Men who experience erectile dysfunction should consider talking with a health care provider. The health care provider may ask about the patient's medical history, the type and frequency of sexual problems, medications, smoking and drinking habits, and other health conditions. A physical exam and laboratory tests may help pinpoint causes of sexual problems. The health care provider will check blood glucose control and hormone levels and may ask the patient to do a test at home that checks for erections that occur during sleep. The health care provider may also ask whether the patient is depressed or has recently experienced upsetting changes in his life. Treatments for erectile dysfunction caused by nerve damage, Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

Type 1 Diabetes And Utis

WRITTEN BY: Georgina Cunningham It’s my second trip to the hospital in a month. I’ve already missed five days of work. I’ve been poked and prodded, I have no good veins left. I’m already covered in bruises from last time and I just don’t want to be here again. I’m putting on a brave face, but everything inside me is telling me to scream at the top of my lungs. I’m doubled over with back pain, a migraine, a horrible fever, tachycardia, and to top it off I have constant low blood sugar. “You again,” says the emergency department doctor. We both know the drill — fluids, intravenous antibiotics and a nice four-night stay in the Acute Ward. I would consider myself a healthy person. I eat a balanced diet, I walk everywhere and my blood sugar levels are even “better than a person not living with Type 1 diabetes” (according to my endocrinologist). I’m hygienic and I had never had a UTI up until this moment. So, to be honest, I couldn’t tell you how I got here. While a UTI might typically be something that is easily treated, it can become dangerous for someone with Type 1 diabetes. It can spread easily through your blood and your kidneys can become damaged. Our bodies can’t fight infections as well as they should, so it’s important to know the signs and make sure you advocate for your own body. Everyone’s bodies are different, even amongst the Type 1 community. When I had the initial infection my sugars were generally stable, so long as I ate. But as soon as the infection spread and I incorporated antibiotics, a small appetite and my normal insulin dosage, my sugars went spiraling down. I’d wake up sitting at 2.3, sometimes even 1.8, in the middle of the night. I’d be tired and grumpy and the last thing I want to do is down some Carbotest (a Continue reading >>

Increased Risk Of Common Infections In Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Increased Risk Of Common Infections In Patients With Type 1 And Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus

Background. Clinical data on the association of diabetes mellitus with common infections are virtually lacking, not conclusive, and often biased. We intended to determine the relative risks of common infections in patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus (DM1 and DM2, respectively). Methods. In a 12-month prospective cohort study conducted as part of the Second Dutch National Survey of General Practice, we compared 705 adult patients who had DM1 and 6712 adult patients who had DM2 with 18,911 control patients who had hypertension without diabetes. Outcome measures were medically attended episodes of infection of the respiratory tract, urinary tract, and skin and mucous membranes. We applied multivariable and polytomous logistic regression analysis to determine independent risks of infections and their recurrences in patients with diabetes, compared with control patients. Results. Upper respiratory infections were equally common among patients with diabetes and control patients. Patients with diabetes had a greater risk of lower respiratory tract infection (for patients with DM1: adjusted odds ratio [AOR], 1.42 [95% confidence interval {CI}, 0.96–2.08]; for patients with DM2: AOR, 1.32 [95% CI, 1.13–1.53]), urinary tract infection (for patients with DM1: AOR, 1.96 [95% CI, 1.49–2.58]; for patients with DM2: AOR, 1.24 [95% CI, 1.10–1.39]), bacterial skin and mucous membrane infection (for patients with DM1: AOR, 1.59 [95% CI, 1.12–2.24]; for patients with DM2: AOR, 1.33 [95% CI, 1.15–1.54]), and mycotic skin and mucous membrane infection (for patients with DM1: AOR, 1.34 [95% CI, 0.97–1.84]; for patients with DM2: AOR, 1.44 [95% CI, 1.27–1.63]). Risks increased with recurrences of common infections. Conclusions. Patients with DM1 and DM2 are at in Continue reading >>

Why Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Uti?

Why Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Uti?

Why Are People With Diabetes More Prone To UTI? Why Are People With Diabetes More Prone To UTI? Category : Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections Atlas Health Screening Pack Bundle of 4 Boxes of Diabetes/ UTI/ Liver Function/ Kidney Function Tests includes 2 Tests per Box First, people with diabetes may have poor circulation, which reduces the ability of white blood cells to travel in the body and fight off any kind of infection. Diabetes impairs some parts of your immune response. You have fewer white blood cells and T cells to fight off invading bacteria, viruses, and fungi.For the same reason, diabetics often develop UTIs caused by less commonly encountered germs. Routine antibiotics may be ineffective. Second, high blood glucose levels can also raise the risk of a UTI. High blood sugars can be a result of both Type 1 and Type 2 diabetes. The pancreas produces a hormone called insulin, which helps to transport glucose from the bloodstream into tissue cells to be utilized as energy. In type 1 diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce sufficient amounts of insulin. In contrast, type 2 diabetes is a result of an impaired response to insulin by cells. Excess glucose is filtered in the kidneys and results in significantly higher urine glucose concentrations when compared to the urine of non-diabetics. Filtered glucose attracts water into the renal tubules, which can increase the urge and frequency of urination. D-Mannose 650mg, 60 Capsules. Fights Urinary Tract Infections (UTI), Cystitis and Supports Bladder Health. High glucose concentrations in the urine provide an abundant source of nutrients for bacteria, which can proliferate and cause an infection. And third, some people with diabetes have bladders that dont empty as well as they should. As a result, urine stays i Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections – Things You Need To Know

In this article we will cover everything you need to know about diabetes and your risk for Urinary Tract Infections. Do you have an increased risk of Urinary Tract Infections now that you have diabetes? We will cover what a Urinary Tract Infection is, symptoms, diagnosis and treatment guidelines, as well as why they are more common in people with diabetes. More importantly, we will discuss steps you can take to prevent them! What Is a Urinary Tract Infection (UTI)? A urinary tract infection or UTI is an infection anywhere in your bladder, kidneys or in the urinary system. An infection of the upper urinary tract or the bladder is called a bladder infection or cystitis. An infection in the urethra is called urethritis. Women tend to be more at risk of these types of infections due to their anatomy; they have a much shorter area between the urethra and the opening to the urethra to the bladder. Urinary tract infections are rare in men under 50 due to their anatomy. A more serious infection of the lower urinary tract is an infection of the kidney and the ureters and is called pyelonephritis. This is a complication and occurs when the bladder infection progresses to the kidneys. I highly advise reading the following articles: According to the Stanford Medicine’s Michael Hsieh Lab, half of women and men will have experienced a urinary tract infection (UTI) during our lifetime at least once. They are the most common infection, and can lead to death in patients who are experiencing it severely. Antibiotics are the most effective therapy.The National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases account 8.1 million visits to the clinic, hospitals for UTI purposes. For women, the risk of getting a UTI is 50 percent greater than a man. What Are The Symptoms of a UTI? L Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections: The Case Against A Pre-emptive Strike

One of the most frustrating things about diabetes is the myriad of ways it can hurt you. Regular readers of this Viewpoint know that patients with diabetes are more prone to heart attacks, stroke, and peripheral vascular disease, as well as damage to the eyes, nerves, and kidney. As if this wasn’t enough, there is another common complication of diabetes that gets less attention, yet which affects thousands of patients every year. I’m talking about infections. Infections can be caused by bacteria, viruses, fungi, or other pathogens, and patients with diabetes are more prone to a whole slew of them. Some of these infections are rare and potentially lethal, like mucormycosis, which almost never affects people without diabetes. Others are more common, like athlete’s foot, pneumonia, and urinary tract infections. While anyone can come down with these conditions, folks with diabetes are more likely than those with normal blood sugar to be affected. Furthermore, the complications of those infections can be much more severe in people with diabetes, and can be more difficult to treat. Take urinary tract infections, for example. Women with diabetes are about two to three times more likely to have bacteria in their bladders than women without diabetes (interestingly, the same does not appear to be true for men). There also seems to be an increased risk of the infection spreading upwards into the kidneys in diabetic patients, and diabetic women with urinary tract infections are also more likely to require hospitalization than non-diabetic women. Why is this the case? Well, diabetes affects many systems that protect against infection in general, and against urinary tract infections specifically. Poor circulation in diabetes reduces the ability of infection-fighting white blood Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (uti) In Diabetes Mellitus

Urinary Tract Infections (UTI) in Diabetes Mellitus Author: John L Brusch, MD, FACP; Chief Editor: Michael Stuart Bronze, MD more... Predisposition to urinary tract infections (UTIs) in diabetes mellitus results from several factors. Susceptibility increases with longer duration and greater severity of diabetes. [ 1 ] High urine glucose content and defective host immune factors predispose to infection. Hyperglycemia causes neutrophil dysfunction by increasing intracellular calcium levels and interfering with actin and, thus, diapedesis and phagocytosis. Vaginal candidiasis and vascular disease also play a role in recurrent infections. Recently, the use of SGLT2 inhibitors, such as dapagliflozin, has produced concern about an increased risk of urinary tract infections in recipients of these medications. Levels of urinary glucose increased with greater doses of the medication; however, the incidence of urinary tract infections did not. Nonetheless, such patients do appear to be at a 3- to 5-fold increased risk of genital infections. [ 2 , 3 ] Over time, patients with diabetes may develop cystopathy, nephropathy, and renal papillary necrosis, complications that predispose them to UTIs. Long-term effects of diabetic cystopathy include vesicourethral reflux and recurrent UTIs. In addition, as many as 30% of women with diabetes have some degree of cystocele, cystourethrocele, or rectocele. All of these may contribute to the frequency and severity of UTIs in female diabetics. Complicated UTIs in patients who have diabetes include renal and perirenal abscess, emphysematous pyelonephritis, emphysematous cystitis, fungal infections, xanthogranulomatous pyelonephritis, and papillary necrosis. The current article focuses on emphysematous UTIs, with which diabetes is closely associ Continue reading >>

Genital And Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetes: Impact Of Pharmacologically-induced Glucosuria

Genital And Urinary Tract Infections In Diabetes: Impact Of Pharmacologically-induced Glucosuria

1. Introduction Type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) is a debilitating disease with multiple complications resulting from hyperglycaemia, inflammation, and possibly immune dysfunction. In addition to macro- and micro-vascular damage, T2DM is also associated with increased risks of asymptomatic bacteriuria (ASB), urinary tract infections (UTIs), and non-sexually transmitted genital infections (vulvovaginal infections and balanitis) [1,2]. ASB is defined as two consecutive voided urine specimens with isolation of the same bacterial strain in quantitative counts ≥105 colony-forming units per millilitre collected from a patient without symptoms of a UTI [3]. The presence of ASB (most commonly caused by Escherichia coli [E. coli] and Klebsiella pneumoniae [K. pneumoniae]) is a major risk factor for developing symptomatic UTI [4]. Patients with diabetes generally present with symptoms of UTIs similar to those reported in healthy controls. Complications of UTIs are also more common in patients with diabetes [5], and this population has an increased risk of acute upper UTI (pyelonephritis) requiring hospital admission [6]. Emphysematous pyelonephritis, a severe manifestation of this disease, is seen almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. This review article aims to explore the relationship between diabetes and UTIs and genital infections, particularly in the context of emerging new therapies for T2DM that pharmacologically increase urinary glucose concentrations. 2. Search strategy We conducted a search of the scientific literature to identify relevant studies in MEDLINE (1990–2012) using the search terms–type 2 diabetes, infections, urinary, vaginitis, balanitis and bacteriuria. We limited the literature searches to humans and English-language publications. The searche Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus And Infection

Diabetes Mellitus And Infection

Some types of infection occur more frequently in patients with diabetes. This increased risk is largely attributable to an altered immune response due to chronic hyperglycaemia, but increased susceptibility to infection may also result from diabetic complications such as diabetic neuropathy and vascular insufficiency. Risk of most common infections is only modestly increased (e.g. 1.2 fold), but a number of rare but potentially fatal infections occur primarily or even almost exclusively in patients with diabetes. These include mucormycosis, emphysematous urinary tract infections, emphysematous cholecystitis, necrotizing fasciitis and malignant otitis externa. Immediate antimicrobial and/or surgical treatment is needed to prevent serious complications from these infections, including death. In general, antimicrobial treatment of infections in patients with diabetes is not different than in patients without diabetes. Glucose lowering therapy often needs to be increased to counter the loss of control associated with infection. Vaccinations against influenza and pneumococcal infections are recommended for patients with diabetes. Incidence and contributing factors People with diabetes are reported to experience 21% more infections than the general population[1]. Several factors may contribute to this, for example possible ‘reporting bias’: more frequent medical visits due to diabetes may lead to better recording of infectious complications. Even so, it seems clear that the risk of many common infections increases in proportion to hyperglycemia. Special problems may also arise in relations to diabetic nephropathy, which may undermine host defences against infection, and peripheral vascular disease which may impair tissue nutrition, oxygen supply and the ability to mount a Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

Diabetes And Urinary Tract Infections

People whose diabetes is not properly controlled have twice the risk of developing infections. In addition to diabetes, you could be more susceptible to urinary tract infections if: Your blood glucose (sugar) levels are not properly controlled. Sugar in the urine promotes bacterial growth. Your nervous system is already affected by diabetes (neuropathy). You could have a “lazy bladder” that does not empty completely. You are a woman. Certain anatomical traits, such as having a shorter urethra, increase the risk of bacterial contamination. You already have diabetes complications in your kidneys or blood vessels. This could be a sign that your diabetes is not properly controlled. You have had a urinary tract infection within the last year. People who have had infections within the last year are more at risk of a recurrence. When to consult? To avoid urinary tract infections, consult your doctor if one or more of these symptoms occur: Fever More frequent urination Burning sensation when urinating Urine has an unpleasant odour False urge to urinate Blood in the urine Abdominal pain when urinating Prevention As is the case for all types of infections if you have diabetes, it is crucial that you maintain your blood glucose (sugar) levels within the target range. Wash your hands often. Do not ignore the urge to urinate. Be sure to stay well hydrated. Quit smoking if you are a smoker. What about cranberry juice? Although studies on cranberry juice seem promising, none has clearly shown that cranberry juice can be used to treat or prevent urinary tract infections. If you nevertheless decide to drink cranberry juice, be aware of the amount of sugar in the juice or cocktail, especially if you are diabetic. Research and text: Diabetes Québec Team of Health Care Professionals S Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Type 2 Diabetes And Recurring Uti

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Im a 55 year old male who was diagnosed with Type 2 Diabetes two years ago. Since then I have been on Metformin 500mg tablets which I take twice a day. Since the beginning of May, I have had a recurring Urinary Tract Infection (burning sensation when I urinate), a high temperature and a general feeling of being unwell. I wake up two or three times during the night, soaked with sweat. I went to see my GP and traces of blood and protein were found in my urine. The doctor prescribed a 7-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg and although these seemed to help bring my temperature down, I was still experiencing discomfort when passing water. My doctor prescribed a further 5-day course of Amoxicillin 250mg. By the end of the second course of antibiotics the burning sensation seemed to have subsided. The practice nurse tested my urine on and confirmed that my infection had gone. However I wasnt convinced that it had completely gone away because my urine still seemed to be very strong and smelly at certain times of the day. My blood pressure has also been high since the onset of these infections. My GP has put me on Ramipril 2.5mg. Another urine test two weeks later showed that my UTI had returned. This time, my GP prescribed a 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. Initially these seemed to clear the infection but within three weeks of finishing the course, my UTI was back. The practice nurse suggested I ask my doctor to refer me to a Urologist. This I did but unfortunately had to wait two months for an appointment. In the meantime I was prescribed another 7-day course of Trimethoprim 200mg. When I eventually saw the Urologist, he examined my prostate, which he said s Continue reading >>

Diabetes And The Risk Of Acute Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women

Diabetes And The Risk Of Acute Urinary Tract Infection Among Postmenopausal Women

OBJECTIVE—To examine whether the presence of diabetes alters the risk of acute urinary tract infection (UTI) in postmenopausal women. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—A case-control study of the Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (GHC), a staff-model nonprofit health maintenance organization in Washington State, was conducted. Subjects were women aged 55–75 years who had been members of GHC for at least 1 year and who had had an acute symptomatic UTI within the preceding month. Laboratory files were used to identify women with a urine culture that grew ≥105 colonies of a urinary pathogen. Medical records were reviewed to confirm the presence of acute, clinically symptomatic UTI. Control subjects were randomly selected from the GHC enrollment file, screened to remove women with recent UTI, and frequency matched to cases by age within 2 years. An interviewer ascertained self-reported clinician-diagnosed diabetes. Diagnosis of diabetes was confirmed by the GHC diabetes registry. A subsample of women underwent measurement of postvoid residual bladder volume (n = 748) and culture of vaginal flora (n = 454). RESULTS—Of the 901 case and 913 control subjects, diabetes was reported in 13.1 and 6.8%, respectively. The health plan diabetes registry confirmed the diagnosis in 92% of women who self-reported the condition. The age-adjusted odds ratio (OR) for UTI in relation to self-reported clinician-diagnosed diabetes was 2.2 (95% CI 1.6–3.0). Adjustment for frequency of sexual intercourse and history of UTI had little effect on this estimate. Compared with nondiabetic women, higher UTI odds were seen in subjects who used oral hypoglycemic agents (OR 2.9 [95% CI 1.7–5.1]) and insulin (2.6 [1.5–4.6]) but not in subjects with untreated diabetes or diabetes treated by Continue reading >>

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

Urinary Tract Infections - Utis

A urinary tract infection is a bacterial infection that grows within the urinary tract - anywhere from the kidneys, the ureters, the bladder and through to the urethra. Urinary tract infections can be a particular problem for people with diabetes as sugar in the urine makes for a fertile breeding ground for bacteria. This is supported by data from the American Diabetes Association (a report at the 73rd Scientific Sessions of the ADA), which showed 9.4% of people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes had a UTI compared to only 5.7% of people without diabetes. [92] What are the symptoms of a urinary tract infection? Urinary tract infections are characterised by two types: Lower urinary tract infections or Cystitis - bacterial infection affecting the bladder and the tube that transports urine from your bladder out of your body via the penis or vagina (urethra) Upper urinary tract infections or Pyelonephritis - bacterial infection affecting the kidneys and the tubes connecting the kidneys to the bladder (ureters) Lower urinary tract infection (affecting the bladder and urethra): Pain or stinging when passing urine (dysuria) Persistent feeling of the need to urinate Cloudy and foul-smelling urine Strong and bad smell of urine Abdominal pan (stomach pain) Back pain Blood in the urine (hematuria) Upper urinary tract infection (affecting the kidneys and ureters): High temperature / fever Constant shivering Vomiting Back pain Pain in your side (flank pain) How serious are urinary tract infections? Some people may find themselves particularly prone to UTIs. Upper urinary tract infections (pyelonephritis) are the more serious of the two. In this case the bacteria have managed to reach the tubes connecting the bladder (ureters) to the kidneys. If the bacterial infection reaches the kidney Continue reading >>

What You Need To Know About Utis

What You Need To Know About Utis

Burning when you urinate. A frequent urge to urinate. Pain in your back or abdomen. Do any of these symptoms sound familiar? These are all symptoms of a urinary tract infection, or UTI, for short. Studies show that people with Type 2 diabetes have a greater risk of getting a UTI than people without diabetes. Despite the fact that UTIs are all too common and downright annoying, they can also lead to more serious situations if they’re not caught and treated. What is a UTI, anyway? A UTI is an infection in your urinary tract. Your urinary tract includes your kidneys, bladder, ureters, urethra, and, in men, prostate. Most UTIs occur in your bladder, the organ that stores your urine. What causes a UTI? A UTI is caused by bacteria, usually from the bowels. Normally, the urinary tract system has safeguards to protect against infection. For example, the ureters, which are the tubes that carry urine from the kidneys to the bladder, have one-way valves to prevent urine from backing up into the kidneys. The process of emptying your bladder (called urination) also helps to flush out bacteria and other microbes. And a healthy immune system helps protect against infection, as well. Why are UTIs more common in people with diabetes? UTIs are the second most common type of infection. Women are 10 times more likely to get a UTI than men because of their anatomy. In fact, more than 50% of women will have a UTI at some point in their lives. If you’re a woman with Type 2 diabetes, your risk may be even higher, according to two recent studies. In one study, 9% of the subjects with diabetes had UTIs compared with 6% of those without diabetes. And the second study showed that people with diabetes had a 60% higher risk of getting a UTI compared to those without diabetes. Why are people with Continue reading >>

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