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Are Diabetics More Prone To Colds

Diabetes And Colds

Diabetes And Colds

Colds aren't fun for anyone, but if you have diabetes, all that sniffling and sneezing comes with an extra risk. When you're sick, there's a chance your blood sugar levels could go up. Some smart strategies can get you back on track. Why Is My Blood Sugar Going Up? When you have a cold, your body sends out hormones to fight the infection. The downside: That makes it hard for you to use insulin properly, and your blood sugar levels may rise. If you have type 1 diabetes and your blood sugar levels get hard to manage, it can lead to problems like ketoacidosis. That's a buildup of too much acid in your blood and it's potentially life-threatening. If you have type 2 diabetes, especially if you're older, very high blood sugar can bring on a serious condition called diabetic coma. How Often Should I Check My Blood Sugar? Check it at least every 3 or 4 hours when you're sick with a cold. If your levels aren't near your target, you can tweak your diabetes management plan -- your doctor may tell you to use more insulin if your blood sugar levels are too high. What Should I Eat and Drink? You may not feel hungry when you first get sick, but it's important to try to eat something anyway. You can have foods from your regular meal plan. The American Diabetes Association recommends you try to eat something with about 15 grams of carbohydrates every hour or so. Some foods to try: 3-ounce fruit juice bar 1/2 cup frozen yogurt 1/2 cup cooked cereal If you don't eat, your blood sugar might fall too low. *CGM-based treatment requires fingersticks for calibration, if patient is taking acetaminophen, or if symptoms/expectations do not match CGM readings, and if not performed, may result in hypoglycemia. Please see important risk and safety information. If you have a fever, vomiting, or diarr Continue reading >>

Stay Well In Flu Season

Stay Well In Flu Season

Protect Yourself from Influenza (The Flu) Information for People with Diabetes (either type 1 OR type 2) and Their Caregivers If you have diabetes, you are three times more likely to be hospitalized from the flu and its complications than other people. The flu may also interfere with your blood glucose levels. But there are steps you can take to protect yourself. Get a flu shot! It’s the single best way to protect yourself against the flu. Take prescription flu medicine when your health care provider prescribes it. Follow special sick day rules for people with diabetes. Take everyday steps to protect your health. People with diabetes should talk with their health care provider now to discuss preventing and treating the flu. People infected with the flu can pass it on to others a day or two before any symptoms appear. That’s why it is important to make sure the people around you get a flu shot as well. A flu shot is the single best way to protect yourself against the flu. The vaccine is safe and effective. It has been given safely to hundreds of millions of people. You should get the flu shot vaccine and not the nasal spray type of vaccine. Everyone ages 6 months and older should get the flu shot unless told otherwise by a health care provider, especially people with diabetes. The flu shot is given with a needle, usually in the arm. The vaccine used in the shot is made from killed virus. You cannot get the flu from the flu shot. A few people may be sore or notice some redness or swelling where the shot was given or have a mild fever. For more information about possible reactions, go to www.cdc.gov/flu. Pneumococcal vaccine is also recommended for people with diabetes. One possible complication of flu can be pneumonia. A pneumonia (pneumococcal) vaccine should also be Continue reading >>

Colds And Illness Gestational Diabetes Uk

Colds And Illness Gestational Diabetes Uk

Jo Paterson Colds , Illness , Infections , sickness , vomiting High blood sugar levels with colds and illness When you are poorly with colds and illness or vomiting, you may notice a rise in blood sugar levels as your body fights to get better. The body releases extra glucose and having gestational diabetes means that you cannot create or use enough insulin to help normalise your blood sugar levels. With higher blood sugar levels your body will cause more frequent urination to help flush out the excess glucose, this in turn can lead to dehydration. Make sure you increase fluid intake if you are poorly. Try to eat little and often to maintain blood sugar levels Frequently test blood sugar levels so that you can see whats happening Take paracetamol to bring down temperatures and give pain relief Try sugar free throat lozenges for sore throats such as Halls sugar free throat sweets Try applying Vicks Vaporub on your neck for sore throats, or on the soles of your feet with colds Try drinking hot water, lemon and ginger for colds Have a warm, steamy shower or bath to clear airways For help with advice when vomiting, take a look at our hyperemesis page here . Consult a medical professional if you are concerned or symptoms persist. If you cannot keep food down then you should contact your hospital Bacteria feed from increased glucose levels and the reduced function of neutrophils (white blood cells that attack infection) in the body mean that diabetics are more susceptible to infection.Gestational diabetes also increases thesusceptibility to various types of infections. The most common infections are urinary tract, yeast infections such as thrush and skin infections. If you suspect you may be suffering with any type of infection then please seek medical advice. In many cases, Continue reading >>

Chronic Conditions & The Flu Link | Everyday Health

Chronic Conditions & The Flu Link | Everyday Health

There's no shortage of reasons why you or a family member might be more likely than others to come down with the flu. Children and infants, for example, have immune systems that are not fully developed, making them more vulnerable to flu viruses and flu complications. Changes to the immune system during pregnancy can leave women more susceptible to the flu. Certain health problems can also put you at higher risk. Read on to learn more about five chronic conditions that maker it harder for people to fend off the flu. And keep in mind: Anyone with a chronic health condition who develops flu-like symptoms should see a doctor right away. Certain chronic conditions weaken the immune system, putting people at greater risk for the flu. The immune system consists of a complex network of tissues and organs that produce white blood cells and transport them throughout the body. These white blood cells enable the body to fight off infections and disease. However, autoimmune diseases including rheumatoid arthritis , lupus , and psoriatic arthritis alter the immune system, making it hard for your body to distinguish between itself and foreign invaders, like the flu virus or other germs. And when your body's defense system isn't working as it should, you may be less likely to fend off infections like the flu. Complicating matters, some of the medications used to treat these diseases from steroids to anti-rheumatics to biologics can also weaken the immune system. Certain types of cancer, particularly blood or lymph cancers like leukemia and lymphoma, can weaken the immune system, increasing your chances of developing the flu and flu complications. Blood cancers cause the white blood cells which would otherwise help regulate the immune system and fight infections take over healthy immu Continue reading >>

Sick Days With Type 1 Diabetes: Tips For Parents

Sick Days With Type 1 Diabetes: Tips For Parents

For those of us with type 1 diabetes, there are two kinds of sick: “diabetes sick” and “real-people sick.” “Diabetes sick” implies that we are unwell because of low blood sugar levels or high blood sugar levels. The more severe the high or the low (high that leads to ketones or lows with more debilitating symptoms) the more fitting the word “sick” applies because of how much more disruptive that blood sugar is to the day and how long it takes to recover from and get back to a safe blood sugar level. “Real people sick” is simply the germs and viruses and bugs that go around that we all are susceptible to whether or not we have diabetes. Colds. Flus. Fevers. Strep. Etc. As a parent, it can be tricky to determine whether to send your kiddo with type 1 to school if they have ketones but will probably recover and be back at a safe blood sugar level within just a few hours. Additionally, at what point does a cold warrant a stay-at-home sick day? I asked our go-to team of D-Parent Experts for their wisdom and thoughts on the issue: So for “real people sick days” I was pretty strict about keeping her home — not because of diabetes but because of the OTHER People out there. I cannot bear people who push sickness on others for the sake of keeping things going, and I wanted my child to learn to be respectful of others. Thankfully, she (and my other child) were seldom sick. But when they were, I kept them home and away from others.High and low blood sugars: This is going to sound harsh but my goal was always to get her back to her “regularly scheduled program.” Ketones and highs can be fixed, and so can lows. So if she woke up with that, we fixed and and sent her on her way. If she was up a lot with highs or lows at night ,we sent her on her way.The re Continue reading >>

How To Treat Flu Or Colds With Diabetes

How To Treat Flu Or Colds With Diabetes

Fall and winter are the viruses' delight. Rhinoviruses (colds) and adenoviruses (flus) prey on people huddled close together in cold weather. They also feel right at home on thousands of daily continental and intercontinental flights on which they fly for free. The vast oceans on the earth host uncounted viral hoards, and global warming makes breeding and mutations easier. Adenovirus transmission often goes from wild birds or bats to chickens, then pigs, and finally to humans. Flu season usually begins in early December and winds up in late March, but a 1999 outbreak began in Alaska in September, and unusual summer influenzas have also been seen in some parts of this country over the last few years. On average, adults develop 2 to 3 colds or flus per year, and children as many as 6 to 12. Knowing when to visit the doctor can be tricky. Here are some criteria to help you make an informed decision. Consult your physician if: a cough gets worse instead of better your illness lasts longer than a week your symptoms get worse instead of better a high fever occurs sinus pain, earache, or toothache develops Viral strains change every year, and about every 30 years an especially severe outbreak or pandemic occurs. A very deadly variant appeared during World War ! and became what is now called the Spanish flu pandemic. Some believe it started on March 11, 1918, at an Army training camp in Fort Riley, Kansas. However, an earlier outbreak probably began earlier in 1916 at a large British war camp near Etaples, France, where large numbers of live chickens and pigs were kept in close proximity to thousands of encamped soldiers. By late spring of 1918, the flu had killed 48 soldiers at Fort Riley. The following fall, it reappeared with a vengence in the fall, killing more Americans, E Continue reading >>

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Myths And Facts: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. Having diabetes nearly doubles your chance of having a heart attack. The good news is that good diabetes control can reduce your risks for diabetes complications. Diabetes is caused by eating too much sugar. Type 1 diabetes is caused by genetics and unknown factors that trigger its onset; type 2 is caused by genetics and lifestyle factors. Being overweight increases your risk for developing type 2, and a diet high in calories from any source contributes to weight gain. Research has shown that sugary drinks are linked to type 2 diabetes. Learn more . People with diabetes are more likely to get colds and other illnesses. You are no more likely to get sick if you have diabetes. However, an illness can make your diabetes more difficult to control. Learn more . People with type 1 diabetes can't participate in sports or exercise. They can be tennis players, mountain climbers, weight lifters, basketball stars, snowboarders the sky's the limit! Women with diabetes shouldn't get pregnant. Women who manage their diabetes well can have a normal pregnancy and give birth to a healthy baby. Learn more . People with diabetes can feel when their blood glucose level goes too low. Not always. Some people cannot feel or recognize the symptoms of low blood glucose, or hypoglycemia, which can be dangerous. Learn more . It's possible to have "just a touch" or "a little" diabetes. There is no such thing. Everyone who has diabetes runs the risk of serious complications. Learn more . You have to lose a lot of weight for your diabetes to improve. Losing just 7% of your body weight can offer significant health benefitsabout 15 pounds if you weigh 200. Learn more . Diabetes doesn't run in my family, so I'm safe. Family histo Continue reading >>

How To Handle A Cold Or Flu -- With Diabetes

How To Handle A Cold Or Flu -- With Diabetes

How to Handle a Cold or Flu -- With Diabetes Learn how to manage the disease when you're under the weather. You're new to diabetes, but you feel you're keeping it under control. Then, bam! You get sick. Diabetes can be tricky when you're under the weather. But if you let your blood sugar get out of whack, you'll feel worse. If you come down with a cold, fever, or flu this winter, you'll be back on your feet sooner with these simple guidelines. Do I keep taking my medicine? "The biggest mistake people with diabetes make when they're sick is that they think they don't have to take their medicine because they're not eating as much," says Elaine Sullivan, RN, a certified diabetes educator at Joslin Diabetes Center. It's true that eating less can lower your blood sugar. But lack of physical activity and sickness itself can raise it. So keep taking your meds while you're fighting off a cold or the flu. What should I eat? It's best to continue your meals as usual. But if you can't eat much, try to get at least 45 to 50 grams of carbohydrate every 3 to 4 hours. Soup, soda crackers, Popsicles, and gelatin might be easier to keep down than your usual staples. What should I drink? Even a meager diet of soup and crackers might not prevent sick-day sugar spikes. Your body gets rid of extra sugar through your urine, and you can help the process along by drinking plenty of fluids. You could be pretty thirsty anyway: High blood sugar can dehydrate you. Drink about 8 ounces of zero-calorie fluid every hour -- unless you can't keep food down. "If you can't eat, have no-calorie beverages one hour, then carb-containing fluids the next," Sullivan says. "That could be 8 ounces of juice or regular soda." Liquids that contain minerals -- like broth or sports drinks -- can help keep you hydrat Continue reading >>

How Does Cold Weather Affect Diabetes?

How Does Cold Weather Affect Diabetes?

Dario doesnt just log and track glucose levels, it charts carb intake, insulin doses, exercise, moods, and more and gives you insights to help understand what may be effecting your blood glucose. The user-centric design of the Dario app allows logbooks, timelines, and charts to be easily shared with loved ones and healthcare providers. Download the Dario App today and scroll down for more information on how to get started. For questions regarding the set up and use of your Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, orders, or other technical support issues, please contact our Customer Service Center at 1-800-895-5921, Monday Friday, 9AM 5PM Eastern. For general inquiries about the Dario Blood Glucose Monitoring System, please fill out the form below and a representative will reach out to you. This form is not for technical support or medical advice. For technical support issues, please call our toll free number 1-800-895-5921 for assistance. If there is an urgent medical issue, please contact your physician. The fall and winter are enjoyable seasons thanks to all the holidays. But they come with cold weather, which can have a negative impact on those living with diabetes. Its that time of the year again. The trees are changing colors, days are getting shorter, and its getting colder by the day. While the fall and winter seasons do have their upsides,they are definitely a challenging time for everybody. As the days shorten, we experience less of the shining sun, which can be a real mental challenge. The lack of sunlight can be accompanied by increased levels of stress and tiredness. But autumn and winter also present those living with diabetes with real physical challenges. Excessive cold stresses and strains the body. This stress often causes the body to go into a flight-o Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Cold And Flu Season

Diabetes And Cold And Flu Season

Your first line of defense is prevention, but you also want to have a diabetes management plan in place in case you catch a cold or the flu. Medically Reviewed by Farrokh Sohrabi, MD Sign Up for Our Living with Diabetes Newsletter Thanks for signing up! You might also like these other newsletters: Sign up for more FREE Everyday Health newsletters . Missoula, Mont., resident Danielle Vulpis, 45, doesnt get colds too often, maybe once or twice a year. Thats a good thing because when she comes down with the latest office bug, the side effects are more serious than a runny nose. Vulpis has type 1 diabetes, and even a run-of-the-mill cold can cause her blood sugar to rise to unhealthy levels. Your body is under stress when youre sick, and it releases hormones to help fight off the illness. However, these stress hormones cause your blood sugar to rise, which can be a problem when youre living with diabetes their presence makes it harder to keep your blood sugar within a normal range. And you want your blood sugar to be as normal as possible because thats whats going to facilitate healing, says Judy Gilman, CDE, a nurse practitioner in Missoula who specializes in wellness and diabetes management. When your blood sugar rises in response to contracting a virus, you are also at risk for a serious complication called ketoacidosis . If your body cant draw in enough sugar from the blood to use for energy, as is sometimes the case when youre sick, it tries to get the fuel it needs using an alternate route. This process produces ketones, a type of acid. Ketones accumulate in your blood and spill into your urine, and high levels can poison your system. Excessive ketones, or ketoacidosis, is more common in people with type 1 diabetes and can result in a coma if not treated. Very high b Continue reading >>

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways To Manage Diabetes In Cold Weather

Eight Ways to Manage Diabetes in Cold Weather Cold weather can throw off your diabetes management. Here are eight ways winter can present a challenge, and what you can do to maintain your blood sugar control. 1. Be aware that cold environments can raise your A1C A1C levels (a measure of average glucose over the previous 23 months) often increase in cold weather. To some degree, bodies seem to do this on their own, perhaps as an evolutionary adaptation that helps raise their freezing point to survive the cold , according to Sharon Moalem, MD, PhD. Pharmacist and diabetes educator Susan B. Sloane says that higher sugars may make you feel warmer in the cold, but they are still unhealthy. Sloane says, Remember not to stay out long in extreme cold, especially if you have any cardiac issues or neuropathy. The cold weather can make blood thicker and more prone to clotting. Diabetes may reduce circulation to feet, leaving them less able to keep warm in cold weather. Winter may increase your chances of infection and nerve pain in your feet. Wear the warmest socks and well-fitting shoes or waterproof boots you can get. Pay extra attention to your foot care ; inspect your feet carefully every day and use moisturizer if the skin is drying (except between the toes). Wear warm gloves or mittens. 4. Keep your diabetes supplies at the right temperature Like extreme heat, extreme cold can affect your insulin and cause your blood glucose monitor to stop working properly. Joslin Diabetes Center advises not leaving supplies in the car in very cold weather. The same applies to insulin vials, pens, and pumps. Cool is generally OK; very cold or freezing is not . Some experts advise keeping a Thermos of warm tea in your diabetes supply case you have one of those, dont you? to keep supplies wa Continue reading >>

Planning Ahead For Sick Days

Planning Ahead For Sick Days

Having a bad cold or the flu can make anyone want to crawl into bed and stay there until it’s over. But when you have diabetes, hiding under the covers and sleeping until you feel better isn’t the best option (although getting plenty of rest is still a good idea). That’s because any illness or infection can make your blood glucose more difficult to control, which increases the risk of serious acute complications. So just when you’re feeling your worst is when it’s most important to stay vigilant about your diabetes care and to take good care of yourself to help your body heal. What happens when you’re sick Your body may know it’s sick even before you feel any symptoms, and a good clue can be an unexplained steady rise in blood glucose. Everybody has a high release of stress hormones when they’re battling or about to battle an illness. Typically, stress hormones cause a rise in blood glucose level because they cause the liver to release more glucose than normal into the bloodstream. People who don’t have diabetes can compensate by releasing more insulin, but people who have diabetes may produce no insulin, or their bodies may not use insulin efficiently, so blood glucose levels stay high unless something is done (such as taking insulin) to lower them. The release of stress hormones and consequent rise in blood glucose level is why people with diabetes are advised to continue taking their diabetes medicines (insulin or oral medicines) when they are sick, even if they’re vomiting. Monitoring blood glucose levels every 2–4 hours and sipping liquids every 15 minutes to stay hydrated are also important. Not taking diabetes medicines during an illness raises the risk of developing diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA), a medical emergency characterized by high bloo Continue reading >>

Cold Weather And Type 1 Diabetes

Cold Weather And Type 1 Diabetes

Note: This article is part of our Daily Life library of resources. To learn more about the many things that affect your health and daily management of Type 1, visit here. Were you diagnosed during winter? Have you noticed that your CGM seems to resemble a rollercoaster when the weather gets cold? It turns out that you may not be just imagining things: climate and temperature are suspected to affect diabetes at nearly every stage, from a Type 1 diagnosis to a typical day in the life of someone who’s had the condition for years. Diagnosis of Type 1 Remember that notorious “environmental trigger” component we’ve all heard about? Factors like viruses along with genetic predisposition are important to consider in a Type 1 diagnosis. According to the NCBI, viruses may be triggering Type 1 “[…] via a direct cytolytic effect, or by triggering an autoimmune process leading gradually to β-cell destruction.” And viruses are more rampant in cold weather because they have a better chance of surviving when our immune system is slower to respond to their presence (Smithsonian). Type 1 diagnoses occur more frequently in colder places, too. According to the International Diabetes Federation, Finland and Norway lead the world in the highest rates of incidence of Type 1 in children (aged 0-14). It appears that cold weather may be putting us at a higher risk of contracting Type 1. Managing Type 1 Cold weather continues to affect after a Type 1 diagnosis and can interfere with management of the chronic illness. If you love winter activities like skiing, skating and snow-angel-making, and you just can’t wait for those first flakes to fall, make sure you’re prepared. Here are some tips on managing Type 1 when it’s chilly outside: Bring adequate snacks and water when embar Continue reading >>

More Susceptible To Colds And Virus's

More Susceptible To Colds And Virus's

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have been diagnosed type 2 for about a fortnight and was starting to feel better. I have however today got a really bad chest and feel a cold coming big time - maybe 'man flue' I can't remember the last cold I had - I have always been meticulous with cleanliness etc. Does diabetes make us more susceptible to stuff like colds? Do we need to take better care of ourselves in that regards and what on earth can I take for a cold - presumably lemsips, honey and lemon etc are way too high in sugar? I was diagnosed in May, this winter I have observed as my wife and three adult kids, son in law and various other family members have suffered from flu and other colds. My sister had swine flu. Throughout, I have been A1!!. (Though I did have both of the flu injections). Having said that, we are supposed to be more prone to such ailments... I'm not sure about being more susceptible, and I remain totally unconvinced about the very existence of "man flu", but I think the effect or impact of colds/flu can be worse than for a non-diabetic. I've had seasonal flu just once about 10 years ago, I was off work for a month, it was the most horrible experience that I would never wish to repeat, so line up religiously for the jab(s) every year. I've been type 1 for 27 years, and in this time I rarely had in problems with colds and flu. About 6 years back I had flu which confined me to bed for a week, wasn't well at all, but apart from that nothing much really. Like Kegstore, I get the seasonal flu jab each year, which is recommended for diabetics regardless of type. I have been told that we are supposedly susceptible to colds and flu, I know from when I had flu it certainly Continue reading >>

Coughs, Colds And Diabetes

Coughs, Colds And Diabetes

Save for later For many people, the chilly month of January brings winter bugs. If you’re ill you may not feel like eating, but, if you've got diabetes, it’s really important to try to get adequate nutrition, particularly carbohydrate and fluids. Try these top tips for eating well when you're under the weather. Eating well Keep to your normal meal pattern if at all possible, but if this is too difficult, eat smaller meals, more frequently. You’ll find this easier than three larger meals, and it will also help to increase your appetite. If you’re off your food or can’t eat properly, you can replace your meals with carbohydrate-containing drinks such as soup, milk or fruit juice. Your dietitian may suggest high-energy supplement drinks between meals, too. Staying hydrated It’s important to drink plenty of sugar-free drinks, particularly water, and keep drinking as much as your can. If you’re being sick and can’t keep anything down, take regular sips of sugary drinks such as fruit juice, cola or lemonade, which can help to regulate your blood glucose levels. Keep taking your insulin and/or other diabetes medications even if you’re not eating, and speak to your healthcare team if you aren’t able to keep food and drinks down. Remember, your blood glucose level naturally goes up during illness and you need to keep it under control. Managing your health and your diabetes You may need to change your dose of insulin and/or other diabetes medications. If you check your blood glucose levels at home, you might have to do it more often when you are ill. Your results will help you and your healthcare professional to decide the changes you need to make to your medications. Contact your GP or a member of your diabetes healthcare team if you are concerned about anyth Continue reading >>

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