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Are Diabetics At Higher Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer?

Risk Factors For Pancreas Cancer

Risk Factors For Pancreas Cancer

Patient Education / Basics of Pancreatic Cancer What are risk factors for pancreatic cancer? There are some factors which can increase the risk of acquiring the genetic mutations that may potentially result in pancreatic cancer. These risk factors are outlined in the table below. You will notice that coffee and alcohol are not listed. Currently there is not strong evidence to suggest that consumption of either substance will increase your risk for developing cancer of the pancreas. Cigarette smoking doubles the risk of pancreatic cancer. In fact, some scientists have estimated that one in four, or one in five cases of pancreatic cancer are caused by smoking cigarettes. Smoking is also associated with early age at diagnosis. Very importantly, the risk of pancreatic cancer drops close to normal in people who quit smoking. Simply put, cigarette smoking is the leading preventable cause of pancreatic cancer. Age: The risk of developing pancreatic cancer increases with age. Over 80% of pancreatic cancers develop between the ages of 60 and 80 years. Race: Studies in the United States have shown that pancreatic cancer is more common in the African American population than it is in the white population. Some of this increased risk may be due to socioeconomic factors and to cigarette smoking. Gender: Cancer of the pancreas is more common in men than in women. Men are more likely to smoke than women. Religious background: Pancreatic cancer is proportionally more common in Ashkenazi Jews than the rest of the population. This may be because of a particular inherited mutation in the breast cancer gene (BRCA2) which runs in some Ashkenazi Jewish families. Chronic pancreatitis: Long-term (chronic) inflammation of the pancreas (pancreatitis) has been linked to cancer of the pancreas. D Continue reading >>

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

The Relationship Between Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Go to: Review The early symptoms of pancreatic cancer, such as abdominal pain, weight loss, fatigue, jaundice, and nausea, are nonspecific and may occur late in the course of the disease [1,2]. As a result, pancreatic cancer is usually diagnosed at an advanced stage, frequently after the tumor has already metastasized. Pancreatic cancer is insensitive to pharmacological and radiological intervention and often recurs after apparently curative surgery. All these factors contribute to the dismal prognosis of the disease [3]. About 80% of pancreatic cancer patients have glucose intolerance or frank diabetes [4,5]. This observation has led to the following two hypotheses: i. pancreatic cancer causes diabetes and ii. diabetes is a risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer. Numerous studies have been performed in order to elucidate the relationship between these two diseases. Evidence suggesting that pancreatic cancer causes diabetes The majority of diabetes associated with pancreatic cancer is diagnosed either concomitantly with the cancer or during the two years before the cancer is found [6]; 71% of the glucose intolerance found in pancreatic cancer patients is unknown before the cancer is diagnosed [5]. These suggest that recently-developed glucose intolerance or diabetes may be a consequence of pancreatic cancer and that recent onset of glucose intolerance or diabetes may be an early sign of pancreatic cancer. Several studies have demonstrated that diabetes in pancreatic cancer patients is characterized by peripheral insulin resistance [4,5,7]. Insulin resistance is also found in non-diabetic or glucose intolerant pancreatic cancer patients, though to a lesser degree [7]. Insulin sensitivity and overall diabetic state in pancreatic cancer patients who undergo t Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Go to: INTRODUCTION As a consequence of the obesity epidemic, the incidence of diabetes is increasing globally, with an estimated 285 million people, or 6.6% of the population from 20 to 79 years of age, affected. Type 2 diabetes mellitus accounts for more than 95% of the cases. Type 2 diabetes mellitus has been associated with an increased risk of several human cancers, such as liver, pancreatic, endometrial, colorectal, breast, and bladder cancer. After cigarette smoking and obesity, type 2 diabetes mellitus is likely the third modifiable risk factor for pancreatic cancer. However, the relationship between diabetes and pancreatic cancer is complex and intertwined. On one hand, diabetes can be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer. On the other, diabetes has been implicated as a predisposing factor for pancreatic cancer [1-3]. An improved understanding of the association between diabetes and pancreatic cancer and the mechanism underlying this association would aid the development of novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of this cancer. Epidemiological Evidence of Diabetes as a Risk Factor for Pancreatic Cancer Diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance is present in 50-80% of patients with pancreatic cancer [4-6]. More than 85% of the diabetes cases in patients with pancreatic cancer are diagnosed fewer than 2 years before the cancer diagnosis or during the cancer course. Patients with new-onset diabetes, in other words, those in whom diabetes was diagnosed no more than 2 years before cancer was diagnosed, are usually considered as having “secondary diabetes” caused by the cancer under the assumption that pancreatic cancer is a rapidly fatal disease: a person with pancreatic cancer-caused diabetes would not live for many years without his or her cance Continue reading >>

Diabetes Correlates With Increased Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes Correlates With Increased Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer

Background and Aim: This study investigated whether diabetes mellitus (DM) increased the risk of pancreatic cancer and whether anti-diabetic drugs reduced the risk in Taiwan. Methods: We designed a population-based cohort study using the Taiwan National Health Insurance Database, which consisted of 49 803 patients aged 20 years and older with newly diagnosed DM as the diabetic group and 199 212 people without DM as the non-diabetic group during 19982007. Results: The incidence of pancreatic cancer was higher in patients with diabetic duration less than 2 years, as compared to the non-diabetic group (27.81 vs 6.96 per 10 000 person-years, 95% confidence interval = 2.117.54). Age (aged 4064, hazard ratio [HR] = 5.22, and aged 65 and older, HR = 7.59, respectively), chronic pancreatitis (HR = 19.40), gallstones (HR = 2.56), and hepatitis C infection (HR = 3.08) were also significant factors predicting pancreatic cancer. Patients with concurrent DM and chronic pancreatitis had an appreciably elevated risk of developing pancreatic cancer (HR = 33.52), as compared with subjects without these comorbidities. The association was not statistically significant between use of anti-diabetic drugs and the risk of pancreatic cancer. Conclusions: Diabetes < 2 years' duration is associated with pancreatic cancer and could be an early manifestation of pancreatic cancer. Long-standing diabetes was not found to be a risk factor for pancreatic cancer in Taiwan's patients. Old age, chronic pancreatitis, gallstones and hepatitis C infection are other risk factors for pancreatic cancer. These high-risk patients should undergo close follow-up programs for pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is a relatively fatal disease with a poor prognosis and a high mortality rate because it is usually dia Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer: Risk Factors

Pancreatic Cancer: Risk Factors

ON THIS PAGE: You will find out more about the factors that increase the chance of developing this type of cancer. To see other pages, use the menu. A risk factor is anything that increases a person’s chance of developing cancer. Although risk factors often influence the development of cancer, most do not directly cause cancer. Some people with several risk factors never develop cancer, while others with no known risk factors do. However, knowing your risk factors and talking about them with your doctor may help you make more informed lifestyle and health care choices. A person with an average risk of pancreatic cancer has about a 1% chance of developing the disease. Generally, most pancreatic cancers (about 90%) are considered sporadic. Also called somatic mutations, this means the genetic changes develop by chance after a person is born. There is no risk of passing these genetic changes on to one’s children. Inherited pancreatic cancers are less common (about 10%). They occur when gene mutations or changes are passed within a family from 1 generation to the next (see below). These are also called germ-line mutations. Often, the cause of pancreatic cancer is not known. However, the following factors may raise a person’s risk of developing pancreatic cancer: Age. The risk of developing pancreatic cancer increases with age. Most people who develop pancreatic cancer are older than 45. In fact, 90% are older than 55 and 70% are older than 65. However, adults of any age can be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Gender. More men are diagnosed with pancreatic cancer than women (see Statistics). Race/ethnicity. Black people are more likely than Asian, Hispanic, or white people to develop pancreatic cancer. People of Ashkenazi Jewish heritage are also more likely to develo Continue reading >>

Diabetes Is A Major Risk Factor Of Cancer Of The Pancreas

Diabetes Is A Major Risk Factor Of Cancer Of The Pancreas

In 2014 about 25 million people had diabetes in the US. About another estimated 60 million are borderline diabetic when blood glucose levels are not quite high enough for an actual diagnosis of diabetes. Most medical research conclude that diabetes is a definite pancreatic cancer risk factor although studies differ on the degree of risk. Some studies show that almost 30% of pancreatic cancer cases are caused by diabetes. Types and Causes of Diabetes One of the roles of the pancreas is producing insulin which balances levels of blood sugars. Diabetes is a disease in which the pancreas fails to either produce sufficient levels of insulin, or the body does not efficiently use the insulin to maintain normal blood glucose levels. Insulin permits glucose to enter cells as a required source of energy. With diabetes, glucose will remain in the blood instead of entering cells. This results in high blood glucose levels which can lead to cell damage creating major health problems including a higher risk of developing cancer of the pancreas. Diabetes can either be a risk or a symptom of pancreatic cancer. Some studies show that 1% of patients diagnosed with diabetes after the age of 50 will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within 3 years of their diagnosis of diabetes. Therefore, new onset of diabetes after the age of 50 may be an early warning sign of pancreatic cancer. Sudden changes in blood sugar levels in patients who previously had well-controlled diabetes could also be a sign of pancreas cancer. Those symptoms must be discussed with a physician. Type 1 Diabetes (Insulin-Dependent). Also known as “juvenile diabetes” because it primarily is diagnosed at childhood although it can occur in adults. It results when the pancreas either does not produce insulin or not enough Continue reading >>

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer?

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer?

Rapid Diabetes Deterioration -- Sign of Pancreatic Cancer? AMSTERDAM Patients with type 2 diabetes whose condition deteriorates rapidly soon after diagnosis may have asymptomatic pancreatic cancer, say European investigators. In a study of more than 550,000 diabetes patients, researchers found that patients who received glucagonlike peptide-1 (GLP-1) receptor agonists, or incretin mimetics, were at significantly increased risk of developing pancreatic cancer. However, the researchers observed that the increased risk diminished rapidly after diagnosis. Given that they also found that the risk for pancreatic cancer was markedly increased after starting insulin therapy, they suggested that "reverse causation" may be in play, with asymptomatic pancreatic cancer initially causing diabetes before progressing to a symptomatic stage. The new findings were presented here at the inaugural meeting of the European CanCer Organisation (ECCO) Congress 2017. Alice Koechlin, from the International Prevention Research Institute (IPRI) in Lyon, France, said in a statement: "Doctors and their diabetic patients should be aware that the onset of diabetes or rapidly deteriorating diabetes could be the first sign of hidden pancreatic cancer, and steps should be taken to investigate it." She cautioned that investigating the possibility of undiagnosed pancreatic cancer is "difficult," as there is currently no good, noninvasive method for detecting asymptomatic pancreatic cancer. "We hope that our results will encourage the search for blood markers indicating the presence of pancreatic cancer, which could guide decisions to perform a confirmation examination like endoscopy," she said. Peter Naredi, MD, PhD, chair of the Congress, president of ECCO, and professor of surgery at the Sahlgrenska Ac Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer

Pancreatic Cancer

Tweet Pancreatic cancer, or cancer of the pancreas, is one of the more dangerous forms of cancer. Diabetes is listed as a risk factor and also a potential consequence of pancreatic cancer. Famous people that have been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer include Steve Jobs, co-founder of Apple Inc. What is pancreatic cancer? The pancreas is an organ that sits close behind the stomach and plays an important part in digestion as well as in keeping our blood sugar levels at safe levels. Pancreatic cancer is when cells start being produced in the pancreas in an uncontrolled fashion by the body. This can lead to a number of health risks which can include diabetes in some cases. How common is pancreatic cancer? Cancer research reports that pancreatic cancer accounts for about 3% of all cancer cases. In 2010, around 8,500 people in the UK were diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Survival rates from pancreatic cancer are low. In 2005-2009, only 4% of people diagnosed with pancreatic cancer survived for 5 years or more. Pancreatic cancer is relatively rare in younger people. Diabetes and pancreatic cancer Type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer have been shown to be linked but researchers have found it difficult to work out which may have the biggest influence on the other. Higher than normal levels of circulating insulin and increased pressure on the pancreas to produce insulin have been suggested as possible reasons for diabetes leading to a higher risk of pancreatic cancer. Looking at the other side of the coin, pancreatic cancer may lead to insulin resistance by increasing the amount of insulin produced by the pancreas and pancreatic cancer can also lead to a loss of insulin producing capacity. Both of these situations can therefore lead to increased risk of diabetes. If the pancrea Continue reading >>

The Link Between Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes

The Link Between Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes

The Link Between Pancreatic Cancer and Diabetes Jaundice, weight loss, diminished appetite, back pain. Theyre vague symptoms that can point to many things, including advanced pancreatic cancer. And though its not as widely known, so, too, can a sudden diagnosis of diabetesparticularly for those over 50, whove never dealt with diabetes before. For 150 years, doctors have known about the link between pancreatic cancer and diabetes, says Suresh Chari, M.D., head of the Pancreas Interest Group in the Division of Gastroenterology and Hepatology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minn. Only recently, however, has that link become better understood. In 1998, during a fellowship at the Mayo Clinic, Dr. Chari was introduced to a 1994 New England Journal of Medicine article suggesting that a hormone secreted by the pancreas caused diabetes in patients with pancreatic cancer. The paper was intriguing, he remembers. Dr. Chari and colleagues tried to replicate the findings, without success. But what they witnessed during the course of their research startled him. Half of the pancreatic cancer patients he worked with were found to have diabetes. It was a serendipitous discovery and it made me wonder if the diabetes was happening before the cancer, and if so, how long before, Dr. Chari says. For the next several years, the doctor set out to find out. His work and the studies of others confirmed that in pancreatic cancer patients with diabetes, changes in blood sugar tended to appear two to three years before the diagnosis of cancer. The utility of that two-year window was immediately obvious. If diabetes came first, and the cancer followed two or so years later, the intervening time could be used to monitor patients and to learn more about how cellular changes in the pancreas can lead Continue reading >>

Diabetes May Be Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes May Be Warning Sign Of Pancreatic Cancer

A presentation to the European Cancer Congress in Amsterdam reports that 50% of people in two sample groups who had been diagnosed with pancreatic cancer had been diagnosed with type 2 diabetes in the previous year and been given their first medication to control it. Fewer than 5 out of 100 people can expect to be alive 5 years after being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer. Survival rates are poor because the cancer doesn't usually cause any symptoms until late in the disease. The American Cancer Society estimates more than 53,000 people will be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer in 2017. "Although it has been known for some time that there is an association between type 2 diabetes and pancreatic cancer, the relationship between the two conditions is complex," Alice Koechlin, from the International Prevention Research Institute in Lyon, France, told the conference. The pancreas contains cells that make insulin. Type 2 diabetes happens when these cells are unable to make enough insulin or the insulin doesn't work properly. The study involved 368,377 people with type 2 diabetes in Belgium and 456,311 in Italy. Among these patients over a 5-year period, there were 885 and 1,872 cases of pancreatic cancer diagnosed respectively. The researchers found that patients had a 3.5 times higher risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer compared to those on other non-insulin, non-incretin diabetes treatments in the first 3 months after their first prescription for a class of diabetes medications known as incretins. The risks decreased with time. These are hormones that stimulate the pancreas to produce more insulin. Among patients who already had type 2 diabetes, the need to switch to injecting insulin because their condition got worse was associated with a seven-times-higher risk Continue reading >>

Diabetes As A Risk Factor Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes As A Risk Factor Of Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes as a Risk Factor of Pancreatic Cancer Department of Gastrointestinal Medical Oncology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, Texas 77030 Pancreatic cancer and diabetes have a complex bidirectional relationship. A large proportion (varied between 50%80% by studies) of pancreatic cancer patients have concurrent diabetes or impaired glucose tolerance (15, 54). It has been debated for a long time whether diabetes is a predisposing risk factor for the development of pancreatic cancer or a consequence of disease onset (24, 37, 66). Because of the relatively low incidence of pancreatic cancer compared to other common cancers and the rapid fatality of this aggressive malignancy, epidemiological investigations faced many challenges. For example, early studies conducted by single institution often have limited study power. Population based case-control studies are easily subject to selection bias or information bias due to the rapid loss of patients with the most advanced disease. Misclassification bias seems unavoidable because there is no current clinical or laboratory methods to distinguish the type 2 diabetes from the pancreatic cancer caused type 3c diabetes (15). As a consequence of the obesity epidemic, the incidence of diabetes is increasing globally, which may have a significant impact on the pancreatic cancer burden. A better understanding of the association between diabetes and pancreatic cancer and the mechanism underlying this association would aid the development of novel strategies for the prevention and treatment of this cancer. Up to date, more than 20 case-control studies (9, 11, 16, 20, 23, 28, 31, 37, 38, 44, 46, 48, 50, 56, 59, 65, 67, 93, 101) and the same number of cohort or nested case-control studies (1, 3, 5, 6, 13, 14, 27 Continue reading >>

Diabetes Tied To Higher Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer In Study

Diabetes Tied To Higher Risk Of Pancreatic Cancer In Study

But it's not always clear which disease comes first, researchers say Please note: This article was published more than one year ago. The facts and conclusions presented may have since changed and may no longer be accurate. And "More information" links may no longer work. Questions about personal health should always be referred to a physician or other health care professional. HealthDay Reporter FRIDAY, April 4, 2014 (HealthDay News) -- People with diabetes have double the risk of pancreatic cancer compared to people who don't have diabetes, according to a new analysis of 88 previous studies. Diabetes has been considered a risk factor for pancreatic cancer, but what's not clear is which condition comes first. This new analysis suggests that at least for some people, pancreatic cancer might be responsible for diabetes. Experts note, however, that the overall risk for pancreatic cancer remains low among people with diabetes. "Our study demonstrated that there is an overall two-fold increased risk of pancreatic cancer in patients with diabetes mellitus," said Dr. Mehrdad Nikfarjam, a senior lecturer and transplant surgeon at the University of Melbourne, in Australia. Diabetes mellitus includes type 1 and type 2 diabetes. "The study also demonstrates that diabetes mellitus itself may be an early indicator of the development of pancreatic cancer in certain cases," Nikfarjam said. "Patients with diabetes mellitus that were analyzed had a seven-fold increased risk of being diagnosed with pancreatic cancer within the first year of being diagnosed with diabetes." "Studies have demonstrated that pancreatic cancer can produce certain substances that influence the way the body handles insulin and blood sugar, resulting in diabetes," he said. "In some patients with pancreatic cancer Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes – A Cellular Case Of Chicken And Egg

Pancreatic Cancer And Diabetes – A Cellular Case Of Chicken And Egg

We’ve all heard the age-old question about the chicken and the egg. Well scientists studying the link between diabetes (a condition where the amount of glucose in your blood is too high because the body cannot use it properly) and pancreatic cancer are facing a similar conundrum. It seems there’s a link between the two conditions, but it’s not clear which one comes first. While the majority of people with diabetes will never develop pancreatic cancer, the question of whether diabetes could be a cause or a consequence of pancreatic cancer is an important one. Answering this could help scientists better understand the biology of these two conditions, and might help spot people at higher risk of pancreatic cancer. So, as it’s pancreatic cancer awareness month, we’ve dug into the evidence to see what is known about these links, and which questions remain unanswered. We know there’s a link Doctors first started exploring the possibility of a link between diabetes and pancreatic cancer in the 1940s and 1950s. Several reports had come out saying that patients with pancreatic cancer were more likely to also have diabetes than other people. This has been shown for type 2 diabetes as well as type 1 and young onset diabetes. Since then, many studies have shown a link between the two conditions. Overall, it seems that people with diabetes are around twice as likely to be diagnosed with pancreatic cancer than the general population. And this makes sense, given that diabetes and pancreatic cancer are diseases that both affect the pancreas. The next big question is: how does this work? Does diabetes increase a person’s risk of pancreatic cancer or is it the cancer that causes diabetes? Or is there something else increasing the risk of both conditions? How pancreatic canc Continue reading >>

Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

Pancreatic Cancer Risk Factors

A risk factor is anything that affects your chance of getting a disease such as cancer. Different cancers have different risk factors. Some risk factors, like smoking, can be changed. Others, like a person’s age or family history, can’t be changed. But having a risk factor, or even many risk factors, does not mean that you will get the disease. And many people who get the disease may have few or no known risk factors. Several factors can affect a person’s chance of getting cancer of the pancreas. Most of these are risk factors for exocrine pancreatic cancer. Risk factors that can be changed Tobacco use Smoking is one of the most important risk factors for pancreatic cancer. The risk of getting pancreatic cancer is about twice as high among smokers compared to those who have never smoked. About 20% to 30% of pancreatic cancers are thought to be caused by cigarette smoking. Cigar and pipe smoking also increase risk, as does the use of smokeless tobacco products. Overweight and obesity Being overweight is a risk factor for pancreatic cancer. Very overweight (obese) people are about 20% more likely to develop pancreatic cancer. Carrying extra weight around the waistline may be a risk factor even in people who are not very overweight. Workplace exposure to certain chemicals Heavy exposure at work to certain chemicals used in the dry cleaning and metal working industries may raise a person’s risk of pancreatic cancer. Risk factors that can’t be changed Age The risk of developing pancreatic cancer goes up as people age. Almost all patients are older than 45. About two-thirds are at least 65 years old. The average age at the time of diagnosis is 71. Gender Men are slightly more likely to develop pancreatic cancer than women. This may be due, at least in part, to highe Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Diabetes And Pancreatic Cancer

Approximately 25.8 million people in the United States, approximately 8.3% of the population, have diabetes. It is estimated that 18.8 million have been diagnosed, but unfortunately, 7.0 million people, or over one fourth, are unaware that they have the disease. Diabetes is a disease in which the body does not make or properly use a pancreatic hormone called insulin. Insulin helps the body utilize glucose (sugar) efficiently. Normally, insulin allows glucose to enter cells to be used for energy. In the case of diabetes, either the body does not produce enough insulin or the amount that is produced is not fully effective. Instead of entering cells, the glucose remains in the blood resulting in high blood glucose levels. Diabetes can cause major health problems, such as high-blood pressure, blindness, kidney disease and neuropathy. Long-term high blood glucose levels can lead to cell damage and long-term complications. There are several types of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes results from the bodys inability to produce insulin and accounts for approximately 5% of those diagnosed with the disease. Type 2 diabetes results from the bodys failure to properly use insulin combined with insulin deficiency and accounts for most diagnosed cases of diabetes in the United States. Pre-diabetes occurs when a persons blood glucose levels are higher than normal, but are not high enough to be diagnosed as type 2 diabetes. Approximately 79 million Americans are pre-diabetic. Other types of diabetes result from specific genetic conditions, surgery, medications, infections, pancreatic diseases and other illnesses. How does diabetes relate to pancreatic cancer? Diabetes may be either a risk factor or a symptom of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer is more likely to occur in people who have lon Continue reading >>

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