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Are Diabetes And Hypoglycemia The Same Thing

Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia

Print Overview Hypoglycemia is a condition characterized by an abnormally low level of blood sugar (glucose), your body's main energy source. Hypoglycemia is commonly associated with the treatment of diabetes. However, a variety of conditions, many of them rare, can cause low blood sugar in people without diabetes. Like fever, hypoglycemia isn't a disease itself — it's an indicator of a health problem. Immediate treatment of hypoglycemia involves quick steps to get your blood sugar level back into a normal range — about 70 to 110 milligrams per deciliter, or mg/dL (3.9 to 6.1 millimoles per liter, or mmol/L) — either with high-sugar foods or medications. Long-term treatment requires identifying and treating the underlying cause of hypoglycemia. Symptoms Similar to the way a car needs gas to run, your body and brain need a constant supply of sugar (glucose) to function properly. If glucose levels become too low, as occurs with hypoglycemia, it can cause these signs and symptoms: Heart palpitations Fatigue Pale skin Shakiness Anxiety Sweating Hunger Irritability Tingling sensation around the mouth Crying out during sleep As hypoglycemia worsens, signs and symptoms may include: Confusion, abnormal behavior or both, such as the inability to complete routine tasks Visual disturbances, such as blurred vision Seizures Loss of consciousness People with severe hypoglycemia may appear as if they're intoxicated. They may slur their words and move clumsily. Many conditions other than hypoglycemia may cause these signs and symptoms. A blood sample to test your blood sugar level at the time of these signs and symptoms is how to know for sure that hypoglycemia is the cause. When to see a doctor Seek a doctor's help immediately if: You have what may be symptoms of hypoglycemia an Continue reading >>

Dka In Hypoglycemia

Dka In Hypoglycemia

#2 0 They are two different entities. While they will both cause acidosis the mechanism of acidosis is different. DKA is from ketosis and acidosis from Hypoglycamia is lactic acid. Is this what you are asking? Diabetic ketoacidosis (DKA) results from dehydration during a state of relative insulin deficiency, associated with high blood levels of sugar level and organic acids called ketones. Diabetic ketoacidosis is associated with significant disturbances of the body's chemistry. Diabetic ketoacidosis occurs when a person with diabetes becomes dehydrated. As the body produces a stress response, hormones (unopposed by insulin due to the insulin deficiency) begin to break down muscle, fat, and liver cells into glucose (sugar) and fatty acids for use as fuel. These hormones include glucagon, growth hormone, and adrenaline. These fatty acids are converted to ketones by a process called oxidation. The body consumes its own muscle, fat, and liver cells for fuel. In diabetic ketoacidosis, the body shifts from its normal fed metabolism (using carbohydrates for fuel) to a fasting state (using fat for fuel). The resulting increase in blood sugar occurs, because insulin is unavailable to transport sugar into cells for future use. As blood sugar levels rise, the kidneys cannot retain the extra sugar, which is dumped into the urine, thereby increasing urination and causing dehydration. Commonly, about 10% of total body fluids are lost as the patient slips into diabetic ketoacidosis. Significant loss of potassium and other salts in the excessive urination is also common. Diabetic Ketoacidosis Causes, Symptoms, and Treatment by eMedicineHealth.com An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sug Continue reading >>

What`s The Difference Between Diabetic And Insulin Comas?

What`s The Difference Between Diabetic And Insulin Comas?

Dear Dr. Johnson: What is the difference between a diabetic coma and an insulin coma? A diabetic coma is the result of hyperglycemia--too much blood sugar --and typically develops slowly over a matter of hours or days as blood sugar and other unwanted blood products build up in the body. Diabetic coma is treated with insulin administered intravenously. This lowers the blood sugar level. Insulin shock is caused by too much insulin, a state that leads to hypoglycemia--too little blood sugar. This condition can come on very rapidly in a person taking insulin for diabetes; therefore, diabetics are instructed to recognize hypoglycemia`s early warning symptoms (mental changes, sweating, etc.) and then to take action to raise their blood sugar levels. When a person with diabetes is found in an unconscious state, it is often difficult to know whether it is the result of a blood sugar level that is too high or too low. Therefore, the usual course of action is to raise the blood sugar level until testing confirms the nature of the problem. There will be little danger in giving added blood sugar to an individual with an already high level, and it might be lifesaving if the problem is low blood sugar. Dear Dr. Johnson: What is your opinion on the current debate on whether restaurants and fast-food joints should list the ingredients of the foods they prepare? I personally favor a simple form of ingredient listing that would give the percentages of fat, carbohydrates and protein as well as the calorie and salt content of foods. I don`t think all ingredients have to be listed, though I do believe the information should be made available if someone requests it. I think we all would be well served by having the major items of nutritional interest for public view. Continue reading >>

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

Insulin Resistance Syndrome

A Common Cause of Carbohydrate Cravings, Fatigue, Depression and Obesity Many people with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, overweight, or sugar/starch cravings are suffering from dysglycemia, which is a disruption in blood sugar metabolism caused primarily by diet. Other conditions that can also be linked to this problem include high blood pressure, some types of high cholesterol, metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, adult onset diabetes, and polycystic ovarian syndrome (PCOS). Blood sugar problems occur on spectrum of disease with fatigue, depression, hypoglycemia, and cravings at one end, insulin resistance and metabolic syndrome in the middle, and prediabetes and adult-onset diabetes at the other end. ---------|-----------------------|----------------------|---------------------|---------------------|----------------------|---- Hypoglycemia Fatigue Depression Weight gain Insulin resistance Metabolic syndrome Prediabetes Diabetes All of these conditions are caused by the same basic problem, dysglycemia, with where you are on the spectrum indicating the severity of your disease. It is important to point out here that not everyone with fatigue, depression, high cholesterol or high blood pressure has dysglycemia or insulin resistance, but many of them do. Virtually everyone with metabolic syndrome, prediabetes, or adult-onset diabetes, however, does have insulin resistance. Insulin Resistance Insulin resistance occurs when cells which would normally take sugar out of the blood, and hence lower blood sugar, become resistant to the action of insulin. It therefore takes more insulin to keep a person’s blood sugar in check. People with insulin resistance syndrome will consequently have normal blood sugar levels and elevated insulin levels. People with insulin resistance tend Continue reading >>

Difference Between Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

Difference Between Diabetes And Hypoglycemia

People often get diabetes and hypoglycemia confused with one another, believing that they are two difference names for the same condition. In actuality, they could not be more opposite. As we eat, our food is converted over to glucose, which is used for fuel in our cells and organs. As long as glucose levels remain balanced, the body runs efficiently. Anything over the recommended level and the body is called being pre-diabetic because you are dangerously close to developing diabetes. Diabetes is a condition that originates when the body does not process sugar in the blood correctly. This sugar is known as glucose. When diabetes is present, the body is suffering from one of two situations: either it is not producing insulin for the body's needs or the insulin that is being produced is not adequate to meet the body's needs. In response, the amount of glucose continues to rise to dangerously high levels. While diabetes addresses the problem of sugar levels being too high, hypoglycemia is when blood sugars are too low (hypo means low and glycemia means the sugar in our blood). There are several reasons why an individual's blood sugar levels would dip too low. One has to do with the foods that they are consuming. Not balancing out foods correctly will cause glucose to drop. Not only will the types of foods cause hypoglycemia, but when you eat them can also create this condition. If an individual is going too long between meals, this is a prime opportunity for sugar levels to fluctuate too low. This is why it is imperative for diabetics to always include healthy snacks between their meals. But according to statistics, the number one reason for hypoglycemia is not food-related. It is triggered by their medication. Type 2 diabetes is different from type 1 diabetes in many ways Continue reading >>

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Differences Between Type 1 And Type 2

Tweet Whilst both type 1 and type 2 diabetes are characterised by having higher than normal blood sugar levels, the cause and development of the conditions are different. Confused over which type of diabetes you have? It's not always clear what type of diabetes someone has, despite what many people think. For instance, the typical assumption is that people with type 2 diabetes will be overweight and not inject insulin, while people with type 1 diabetes will be, if anything, underweight. But these perceptions just aren't always true. Around 20% of people with type 2 diabetes are of a healthy weight when diagnosed, and many of them are dependent on insulin. Similarly, people with type 1 diabetes will in some cases be overweight. Because both types of diabetes can be so varied and unpredictable, it's often difficult to know which type of diabetes someone has. It's not safe to assume that an overweight person with high blood glucose levels has type 2 diabetes, because the cause of their condition might in fact be attributable to type 1. In some cases, when the type of diabetes is in doubt, your health team may need to carry out specialised tests to work out which type of diabetes you have. This way, they can recommend the most appropriate treatment for your diabetes. Common differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes Despite the uncertainty that often surrounds a diagnosis of diabetes, there are a few common characteristics of each diabetes type. Please note that these differences are based on generalisations - exceptions are common. For instance, the perception of type 1 diabetes isn't strictly true: many cases are diagnosed in adulthood. This table should be seen as a rough guide to the differences between type 1 and type 2 diabetes, rather than hard and fast rules. Co Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms But Normal Levels

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms But Normal Levels

High blood sugar usually feels bad. Kerri Sparling of the blog Six Until Me said, “It’s a thick feeling in the base of your brain, like someone’s…replaced your gray matter with sticky jam.” Other people report physical symptoms such as fatigue, weakness, headaches, blurry vision, thirst, and frequent urination. These symptoms often drive people to seek help, which is a good thing. Other people can get used to high sugars. They may feel few or no symptoms. That’s not good, because blood vessel damage is still going on, even if you can’t feel it. If your body gets comfortable with higher blood sugars, normal sugars may start to feel bad. A woman named Angela posted to Diabetes Daily, “I feel so crappy when my [blood sugar] is in the 90s…. That seems to be about 50% of the time. Sometimes I test when I’m feeling GOOD and it’s [much higher]…. I want a low A1C, but I don’t want to feel ‘fuzzy’ all the time either.” What is happening is that Angela’s body adjusted to higher sugars. Now she’s getting tighter control, but she’s not used to it. On another site, diabetes educator Janet Mertz explained, “Because your body is accustomed to the higher levels, the lower numbers may now be perceived as too low…. Your body reacts like you’re having low blood sugar (hypoglycemia)…. It generally takes a couple of weeks for the body to adjust to the new, healthier numbers.” Another person wrote on Yahoo! Answers, “When I was diagnosed, my sugar was over 350. I started metformin and eating very little carbohydrate. My levels dropped to the 150s by the end of the week. I wasn’t anywhere near hypoglycemic, but I felt like I was. I had all the signs — dizziness, shakiness, and weakness. Within a couple of weeks, the symptoms disappeared. Continue reading >>

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 Diabetes Low Blood Sugar Symptoms

Type 1 diabetes in an autoimmune disease where a person’s pancreas doesn’t produce insulin—a hormone needed to convert food into energy. It affects children and adults, comes on suddenly, and it cannot be prevented or cured. Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is a common and dangerous occurance with type 1 diabetes. If your blood sugar gets too low it may lead to insulin shock, which is life-threatening if not cared for. Low blood sugar can happen when your body has too little food—or glucose—or when it produces too much insulin. Type 1 diabetes hypoglycemia symptoms So what are the low blood sugar symptoms you should look out for? It’s important to realize that the signs of low blood sugar will vary depending on the person. However, people with type 1 diabetes—whether it’s been diagnosed or not—may experience one or more of the following: -Sweating and shaking -Blurry vision -Poor coordination -Dizziness or feeling lightheaded -Difficulty concentrating -Feeling anxious or irritable -Hunger or nausea -Erratic changes in behavior What to do if you experience low blood glucose symptoms Severely low blood-sugar levels can lead to hypoglycemic seizures, unconsciousness, coma, and death if left untreated. That’s why it’s important to see a doctor if you think you have low blood sugar so he or she can check your blood-glucose levels—look into whether type 1 diabetes may be a cause—and provide the necessary treatment. Your support is more critical than ever Continue reading >>

The Truth About Hypoglycemia

The Truth About Hypoglycemia

I’ve received this question a number of times over the years: “I have episodes of hypoglycemia that make me really tired, foggy, and shaky. My doctor says to drink a glass of orange juice or eat some candy immediately and it works. But what should I do on the Wheat Belly lifestyle?” First of all, let’s put aside hypoglycemia–low blood sugars, generally 70 mg/dl (3.8 mmol/L) or less–that occurs in people with diabetes. In diabetics, it is a matter of making adjustments in insulin or other medications, or avoiding blood sugar drops during exercise, sleep, or prolonged periods of not eating. I’m not talking about this kind of hypoglycemia. I’m also not talking about very rare causes of hypoglycemia, such as insulinoma (a form of pancreatic cancer), binge drinking, antibodies against insulin or the insulin receptor in people with lupus, people who have undergone gastric bypass surgery, or have rare inherited carbohydrate metabolism defects such as glycogen storage diseases. Put all of that aside. I’m talking about the common, everyday form of hypoglycemia that plagues non-diabetic people and is responsible for symptoms such as fatigue, mental “fogginess,” confusion, slurred speech, trembling, rapid heart beat, irritability, and sweating. This form of hypoglycemia–“reactive hypoglycemia”–typically occurs about 90 minutes to 3 hours after eating (varying depending on the composition of the meal and the vigor of your insulin response). The conventional “solution,” as in the question above, is to consume some source of sugar, usually 15 to 25 grams worth. Once you understand why hypoglycemia develops, however, you will understand how knuckleheaded that solution is. Outside of diabetes, some diabetes drugs, and the rare causes of hypoglycemia me Continue reading >>

What Is Hypoglycemia?

What Is Hypoglycemia?

About Glucose — Your Body’s Energy Source Three of the many important parts that make up your body are cells, tissues, and organs. All three of these things need fluid, oxygen and energy to sustain life. Cells get energy from food we eat that contains protein, fat, and carbohydrates. But before our bodies can use the foods we eat it, food must be broken down and converted into glucose, a form of sugar our bodies can use for energy. and then be able to get that usable energy into cells, tissues and organs. The way the body moves energy from food (that has been converted into blood glucose) into cells and tissues is through a hormone called insulin. Insulin makes cells receptive to receiving glucose; acting like a key to open cells so that they can be nourished. If a person does not make enough insulin, or their bodies resist the affect of insulin, they may begin to suffer from an abnormally high level of glucose in the blood stream (hyperglycemia) because cells cannot get glucose from the blood stream. People who have type 1 diabetes do not produce insulin on their own. This is why all people with type 1 diabetes (and many people with type 2 diabetes) must take insulin each day to live. Without insulin, no matter how much you ate, cells in your body would begin to die. About Glucose (Sugar) in Your Bloodstream The main form of energy used by your body is called glucose. Some people simply refer to glucose in the body as “sugar.” For example, you may hear a person with diabetes say they are testing their blood sugar or, that their blood sugar is too high. What they are really referring to is blood glucose levels. Glucose is just one a many forms of sugar. It is not the same thing as the granulated sugar you buy in stores, which is another form of sugar called “s Continue reading >>

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low Blood Sugar Symptoms And Ranges

Low blood sugar (hypoglycemia) definition and facts Hypoglycemia is the medical term for low blood sugar. It typically occurs as a side effect of medications for diabetes. The normal range of blood glucose is from 70 to 100 mg/dL in an individual without diabetes, Most people will feel the effects and symptoms of low blood sugar when blood glucose levels are lower than 50 mg/dL. Low blood sugar is treated by giving a readily absorbed source of sugar, including soft drinks, juice, or foods containing sugar. If the hypoglycemia has progressed to the point at which the patient cannot take anything by mouth, an injection of glucagon may be given. Glucagon is a hormone that causes a fast release of glucose from the liver. Hypoglycemia or low blood sugar is syndrome that results from low blood sugar. The severity and symptoms of hypoglycemia can vary from person to person. Blood tests can diagnose low blood sugar, and symptoms resolve when the levels of sugar in the blood return to the normal range. The medical term for blood sugar is blood glucose. What can cause low blood sugar? Despite advances in the treatment of diabetes, low blood sugar episodes occur as a side effect of many treatments for diabetes. In fact, these episodes are often the limiting factor in achieving optimal blood sugar control, because many medications that are effective in treating diabetes carry the risk of lowering the blood sugar level too much, causing symptoms. In large scale studies looking at tight control in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes, low blood sugars occurred more often in the patients who were managed most intensively. This is important for patients and physicians to recognize, especially as the goal for treating patients with diabetes becomes tighter control of blood sugar. While peopl Continue reading >>

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

Must Read Articles Related To Insulin Reaction

A A A Insulin Reaction An insulin reaction occurs when a person with diabetes becomes confused or even unconscious because of hypoglycemia (hypo=low + glycol = sugar + emia = in the blood) caused by insulin or oral diabetic medications. (Please note that for this article blood sugar and blood glucose mean the same thing and the terms may be used interchangeably.) The terms insulin reaction, insulin shock, and hypoglycemia (when associated with a person with diabetes) are often used interchangeably. In normal physiology, the body is able to balance the glucose (sugar levels) in the bloodstream. When a person eats, and glucose levels start to rise, the body signals the pancreas to secrete insulin. Insulin "unlocks the door" to cells in the body so that the glucose can be used for energy. When blood sugar levels drop, insulin production decreases and the liver begins producing glucose. In people with diabetes, the pancreas is unable to produce enough insulin to meet the body's demand. Treatment may include medications taken by mouth (oral hypoglycemics), insulin, or both. The balance of food intake and medication is not automatic, and a person with diabetes needs to be aware that too much medication or too little food may cause blood sugar levels to drop. Interestingly, brain cells do not need insulin to access the glucose in the blood stream. Brain cells also cannot store excess glucose, so when blood sugar levels drop, brain function is one of the first parts of the body to become affected. In an insulin reaction, the blood sugar levels are usually below 50 mg/dL (or 2.78 mmol/L in SI units). Continue Reading A A A Insulin Reaction (cont.) Insulin reactions occur when there is an imbalance of food intake and the amount of insulin in the body. The oral hypoglycemic mediat Continue reading >>

The Life-or-death Difference Between Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

The Life-or-death Difference Between Insulin Shock Vs Diabetic Coma

Today over 10.9 million seniors over age 65, or 26.9% of the aging population suffers from diabetes. Diabetics face a number of challenging health complications, including eye, foot, skin, and hearing problems as well as neuropathy, kidney disease, mental health issues, and much more. Two commonly misunderstood diabetic emergencies are insulin shock and diabetic coma. The terminology is confusing, and is mistreated or misdiagnosed, these conditions could result in death. If someone you know is a diabetic or you live with diabetes yourself, its critical to have a grasp on the differing symptoms that insulin shock and diabetic coma present with. Here’s how to properly identify the difference between insulin shock versus a diabetic coma. What is Insulin Shock? Insulin shock is the result of hypoglycemia, a sudden drop in blood sugar, which leads to unconsciousness. A person experiencing acute insulin shock may exhibit early symptoms such as dizziness, hunger, and shakiness that may progress to tingling sensation throughout the body, physical weaknesses, rapid heartbeat, and labored breathing. This condition can cause seizures and permanent brain damage. What is Diabetic Coma? A diabetic coma is a serious, but reversible, condition that has a longer onset. While insulin shock happens quickly, it can take days for a diabetic coma to set in, and happens frequently to those who do not realize they are diabetic yet. In many cases, patients experience symptoms such as excess thirst or urination, several weeks prior to diagnosis. Diabetic comas can come as the result of both extremely high blood sugar (hyperglycemia) and very low blood sugar (hypoglycermia) and are most common among seniors. Older adults may have an altered sense of thirst and are more likely to become dehydrat Continue reading >>

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

4 Clues You Have Non-diabetic Hypoglycemia

Hypoglycemia, or low blood sugar, is often thought about as part of diabetes, but there is also non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia is just as equally problematic. When blood sugar is too low, the cause is not as important as realizing the impact. Some of the effects of hypoglycemia are immediate while others take time to manifest, resulting in long term deficits in your health. What is Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia? Hypoglycemia, which again is the same as low blood sugar, is most often thought about in diabetics. This group of individuals often uses medications, including insulin, to lower their glucose, which is often high. When their glucose drops too low as a result of the medication, they are considered in a hypoglycemic state. However, an entire different segment of the population deals with non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs for reasons that are almost the exact opposite of why someone would develop diabetes. While diabetes arises as a result of excess carbohydrates in the diet, non-diabetic hypoglycemia occurs from a lack of carbohydrates in the diet. Carbohydrates are essential as the preferred energy source for our body. Yes, the total amount of carbohydrate and the source should factor in, but carbohydrates are necessary. In addition to not eating enough carbohydrates, insufficient production of hormones and neurotransmitters (nervous system communicators) can lead to non-diabetic hypoglycemia. Contrary to common medical thought, this does not require the presence of a named disease of the glands that produce the chemicals that helps us keep glucose balanced. 4 Clues that You May Have Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Fatigue: The Number One Symptom of Non-Diabetic Hypoglycemia Hypoglycemia is the same as low blood sugar. Blood Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

Prediabetes Warning: Hypoglycemia Vs Diabetes

A prediabetes warning can be characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, and more. This phenomenon, despite how common it is, is not normal, nor is it healthy. It’s the classic sign of what is known as reactive hypoglycemia and an early symptom of the prediabetes-related condition known as insulin resistance. Refined Carbs Can Cause Wild Mood Swings If you eat a meal loaded with sugar and refined carbs, you will experience wild swings in blood sugar that make you feel tired, anxious, irritable, and hungry for more quickly absorbed sugars. When you repeat this process day in and day out, eating a diet full of empty calories, refined carbohydrates (bread, pasta, rice, potatoes), sugars, and sweetened beverages (sodas, juices, sports drinks), your cells start to become resistant or numb to insulin. You end up needing more and more insulin to keep your blood sugars down. This is insulin resistance, a pre-diabetic condition that has become an epidemic. What is Reactive Hypoglycemia? Reactive hypoglycemia is characterized by low blood sugar symptoms like fatigue, weakness, tiredness, dizziness, sweating, shakiness, palpitations, anxiety, nausea, a sensation of hunger, and difficulty with concentration which occur after eating an abundance of sugar or refined carbs. These reactive hypoglycemia symptoms occur in the early stages of insulin resistance. Take a typical breakfast these days: swigging a large sweetened coffee drink and grabbing something from the Starbucks pastry case will give you a big energy surge as your sugar and insulin levels spike. What follows, however, are inevitable sugar crash symptoms as your blood sugar plummets. With this comes the low blood sugar fatigue. Insulin Levels May Be the First Sign That Something is Wrong Continue reading >>

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