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Are Dairy Products Bad For Diabetics?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

What Are The Best Milk Options For People With Diabetes?

Many people have childhood memories of parents urging them to drink lots of milk. When you’re a child, you typically have to drink whatever milk your parents provided for you. It may have been a more traditional option such as whole milk or a sweet alternative such as almond milk. Now that you’re the one doing the choosing, you can pick the best type of milk for you. If you have diabetes, you should know that not all types of milk are beneficial for you. Although you need the nutritious calcium and protein found in milk, it’s important to note the saturated fats, carbohydrates, and sugar levels in each. This information will help you pick the best milk for your dietary needs. People with diabetes are not able to make, or use, insulin effectively. Insulin is a hormone that helps regulate blood sugar. When insulin isn’t doing its job efficiently, blood sugar levels can spike. There are two kinds of diabetes: type 1 and type 2. No matter which type you have, managing your sugar intake is important. Sugar is a type of carbohydrate, which is why carb counting is often recommended for people with diabetes. People with diabetes may also have high cholesterol or triglycerides in their blood. Triglycerides are a type of fat, which can increase the risk for a heart attack. Keeping an eye on the saturated and trans fat content in your diet is important. Diabetes can also make some people more susceptible to bone fractures. A diet high in calcium can help keep bones strong. One way to do this is by drinking milk daily. Adding calcium-rich milk into your diet may take a bit of planning. Creating a meal plan specifically designed for people with diabetes can be a good place to start. The American Diabetes Association recommends several meal plans geared toward keeping blood s Continue reading >>

Dairy, Diabetes, And Your Heart

Dairy, Diabetes, And Your Heart

My wife’s grandfather passed away two weeks ago. At 94, he'd lived an amazing life. He grew up in a family that owned large areas of land near Farmington, New Mexico, and Durango, Colorado. He served as a pilot in World War II, married a wonderful woman, and had seven children. His wife died in her late fifties of ovarian cancer, and he lived another 40 years alone as a widower. He worked hard his entire life and continued to farm and ranch into his nineties. His legacy is left through his family, and through the many people he touched with small acts of kindness. He was a loving man of few words, but when we spoke, the words he chose were always uplifting. He lived his long, active life on a diet rich in meat and dairy products, which we’re often advised to avoid for heart health. The first few years I knew him, I think my wife’s grandfather had whole milk and a steak for at least two of his daily meals. You'd think that such a diet could be harmful, but he remained independent in his home, still working, until a stroke suddenly took his life. When I see patients in the clinic, one of the first things they mention when we discuss diet is that they intend to cut out all dairy products. Because nutritional guidelines often recommend a low-fat diet, most people believe this means they should consume less dairy fat. But is this a good idea? Are milk, cheese, butter, and other dairy products really harmful to your health, and should you avoid them? Personal experience and new clinical research sheds light on this question. The Facts on Dairy Products and Your Health First, whole-fat or low-fat dairy products have not been associated with an increase in heart disease risk factors when they’re consumed in moderation, shows a study review published in October 2013 in P Continue reading >>

Dairy & Diabetes Risk: New Thinking?

Dairy & Diabetes Risk: New Thinking?

Dec. 5, 2014 -- Some intriguing new research shows that dairy foods, perhaps even high-fat ones, may play a role in type 2 diabetes prevention. Although experts say it’s too soon to draw clear conclusions, the findings seem to run counter to current advice to people with diabetes, who are generally told to pick low- or non-fat dairy products. Recent studies on how dairy products might lower diabetes risk don't all reach the same verdict. Nor do they agree about exactly which types of dairy and which fat contents are best. Some studies have found that yogurt has a strong effect on cutting diabetes risk, but not other dairy products. What's clear is that dairy products benefit more than our bones, says Michael Tunick, PhD. He's a research chemist at the Agricultural Research Service at the U.S. Department of Agriculture. He reviewed recent research on dairy goods and health in a report published in November in the Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry. Besides preventing diabetes, lowering blood pressure, and reducing heart disease risk, he found research showing dairy products can even prevent tooth decay, obesity, and cancer. ''Diabetes prevention may be an added benefit that is unexpected," he says. Last year, researchers pooled the results of 17 different studies that had looked at dairy foods and type 2 diabetes. Those who ate dairy products, including low-fat dairy and cheese, had a lower diabetes risk than those who did not. More recently, Harvard researchers looked at the diet habits of more than 289,000 health professionals, including nurses and doctors. They also checked the results of 14 published studies looking at dairy and diabetes risk. In this research, yogurt emerged as the star. While other types of dairy were not linked with a substantial drop in Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Diabetes And Yogurt: The Do’s And Don’ts

Yogurt can be a great nutrient-dense breakfast option or an easy snack. It is low in carbohydrates, meaning it won’t cause blood sugar spikes in people with diabetes. There may even be additional benefits for people with diabetes. What Research Shows Fermented foods, such as yogurt, contain good bacteria called probiotics. Probiotics have been shown to improve gut health. Research on gut health is ongoing, but gut bacteria and overall health could play a factor in a number of health conditions, including obesity and diabetes. What Do I Need to Know About Probiotics? Recent research shows that yogurt consumption might be associated with lower levels of glucose and insulin resistance, and lower systolic blood pressure. Another study found a potential link between regular yogurt consumption and a reduced risk for type 2 diabetes. These studies are encouraging, but more research is needed to determine what link, if any, exists between yogurt and type 2 diabetes. What Makes Yogurt Great Most dairy products are low on the glycemic index. This makes them ideal for people with diabetes. To get the most out of your yogurt, check the labels before you purchase. If you want the gut benefits from the probiotics, choose a yogurt that contains live and active cultures. Also pay attention to the nutrition facts. Many yogurts have added sugars. Look for yogurts with high protein content and low carbohydrates, such as unflavored Greek yogurt. Sugar content among brands, and even among flavors within the same brand, can vary drastically, so check labels closely. Carbohydrates By Yogurt Type Yogurt Type (6 ounces) Carbohydrates Sugar plain Greek yogurt 6-8 grams 4-8 grams flavored Greek yogurt 16-22 grams 12-18 grams plain yogurt 11-15 grams 10-12 grams vanilla yogurt 22-33 grams 21-28 Continue reading >>

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

Milk Products And Type 2 Diabetes: An Update

The relationship between milk product consumption and type 2 diabetes has been examined in several meta-analyses. Evidence to date suggests that milk product consumption is associated with a reduced risk of developing type 2 diabetes. Highlights Milk product consumption is associated with a decreased risk of developing type 2 diabetes; Total dairy and low-fat milk products are largely associated with a reduced risk of type 2 diabetes; High-fat dairy/dairy fat is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Fermented dairy, including cheese and yogurt, is either not associated or inversely associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; There appears to be an inverse dose-response relationship between yogurt and cheese and the risk of type 2 diabetes. Synopsis Several meta-analyses of numerous prospective cohort studies have examined the role of milk products in the development of type 2 diabetes. The totality of the evidence to date suggests that there is an inverse association between milk product consumption, including specific milk products such as yogurt and cheese, and the risk of developing type 2 diabetes. The Evidence A meta-analysis published in 2014 investigated the association between the consumption of different types of dairy products and the risk of type 2 diabetes. The analysis consisted of data from 14 prospective cohort studies (N = 459,790), including the Health Professionals Follow-Up Study, the Nurses’ Health Study and the Nurses’ Health Study II.1 Total, high-fat and low-fat dairy intake were not associated with the risk of type 2 diabetes; Yogurt consumption (both plain and flavoured) was associated with an 18% decreased risk of type 2 diabetes (pooled relative risk of 0.82 per one serving of yogurt/day, 95% CI: Continue reading >>

Dairy Products And Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Implications For Research And Practice

Dairy Products And Prevention Of Type 2 Diabetes: Implications For Research And Practice

Go to: Introduction Diabetes is a global epidemic with major health, social, and economic implications. Over the last three decades, the prevalence of diabetes has more than doubled, and more than 371 million people worldwide now have diabetes (1). In 2012, diabetes was the cause of 4.8 million deaths and the estimated health care cost of diabetes was $471 billion worldwide (1). Type 2 diabetes (T2D) accounts for at least 90% of all diabetes cases and its rates have been increasing at an alarming rate in every country (2). Lifestyle has been identified as playing a major role in the development and prevention of T2D. T2D usually develops during adulthood and is associated with obesity, physical inactivity, and unhealthy diets (2). A growing body of scientific evidence has linked dairy products to a reduced risk of T2D. Potential underlying mechanisms remain to be fully elucidated but may include a beneficial role of dairy products in obesity and metabolic syndrome (MetS), two important risk factors for T2D, as well as a beneficial role of certain dairy components such as calcium, vitamin D, dairy fat, and specifically trans-palmitoleic acid. Unfortunately, dairy products remain largely under-consumed by all age groups. An astonishing number of Americans (more than 80% men and 90% women) do not meet the minimum dairy requirements of the Dietary Guidelines for Americans (DGA) (3). A large proportion of Canadians also do not meet the minimum daily recommendations established by Health Canada, with an average intake for adults being 1.52 servings, which is well below the 2–4 recommended daily servings (4). Under-consumption of dairy products has also been reported in many other parts of the world (5–7). Given the increasing amount of evidence on the beneficial role of d Continue reading >>

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

Top 10 Worst Foods For Diabetes

These foods can can cause blood sugar spikes or increase your risk of diabetes complications. Whole Milk For those with diabetes, a diet high in saturated fat can worsen insulin resistance. Keep whole milk out of the fridge, and pick up 1% (low-fat) or skim (non-fat) milk instead. Also, try your best to avoid other whole-milk dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, regular cheese and cream cheese; instead, choose their reduced-fat counterparts whenever possible Previous Next More Photos Bacon White Bread Continue reading >>

The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes With A Dairy-free Diet

The Cheese Trap: Fighting Diabetes With A Dairy-free Diet

Have you ever felt pulled to a certain food? Maybe it’s chocolate, potato chips, a hamburger, or a bowl of ice cream. For some people, it’s cheese. After 30 years of conducting clinical research studies and prescribing the same approach—a low-fat vegan diet—to participants eager to lose extra weight, lower blood pressure, improve cholesterol, alleviate headaches and joint pain, and feel great again, I always get pushback about the same food: cheese. Parting ways with this ultra-processed substance, which smells like the bacteria it is, seems harder than eliminating chicken, turkey, yogurt, fish, and milk, which collectively don’t have the same gravitational pull as cheddar, mozzarella, feta, and baked brie. Part of this habitual preference is neurological. As cheese digests it may release tiny molecules, casomorphins, that can bind to dopamine receptors in our brain.[1][2][3] This “feel good” chemical reaction looks similar to any other dopamine trigger, from alcohol and drug use to exercise or listening to music. The casomorphins in cheese may be what drives pizza, along with its hyperpalatable state, to the No. 1 spot on the Yale Food Addiction Scale.[1] While this neurological tangle isn’t as potent as alcohol, drugs, and tobacco, it’s still present and lingers in our minds. It’s also entrenched in our society. We consume 37 pounds of cheese, per person, each year.[5] This is nearly twice the amount of cheese we consumed, per person, in 1975.[6] The dairy industry’s marketing wizards do a good job: they sell their products, keep us coming back, and maintain a strong foothold in American homes. It’s hard to compete. They even have the U.S. government hooked. In return for $140 million, Uncle Sam works with Dairy Management Inc. to promote dairy Continue reading >>

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

The Best And Worst Drinks For Diabetics

Drinks for Diabetics iStock When you have diabetes, choosing the right drink isn’t always simple. And recent studies may only add to the confusion. Is coffee helpful or harmful to insulin resistance? Does zero-calorie diet soda cause weight gain? We reviewed the research and then asked three top registered dietitians, who are also certified diabetes educators, what they tell their clients about seven everyday drinks. Here’s what to know before you sip. Drink More: Water iStock Could a few refreshing glasses of water assist with blood sugar control? A recent study in the journal Diabetes Care suggests so: The researchers found that people who drank 16 ounces or less of water a day (two cups’ worth) were 30 percent more likely to have high blood sugar than those who drank more than that daily. The connection seems to be a hormone called vasopressin, which helps the body regulate hydration. Vasopressin levels increase when a person is dehydrated, which prompts the liver to produce more blood sugar. How much: Experts recommend six to nine 8-ounce glasses of water per day for women and slightly more for men. You’ll get some of this precious fluid from fruit and vegetables and other fluids, but not all of it. “If you’re not in the water habit, have a glass before each meal,” recommends Constance Brown-Riggs, MSEd, RD, CDE, CDN, a spokesperson for the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics and author of The African American Guide to Living Well with Diabetes. “After a few weeks, add a glass at meals too.” Drink More: Milk iStock Moo juice isn’t just a kids’ drink. It provides the calcium, magnesium, potassium, and vitamin D your body needs for many essential functions. Plus, research shows it may also boost weight loss. In one study of 322 people trying to sl Continue reading >>

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

20 Foods To Avoid If You Have Diabetes

A large part of keeping your diabetes in control is about making the right food choices. If you have diabetes, a general rule to follow is to stay off foods that are high in sugar. However, some foods and drinks may appear to be healthy options but might contain hidden sugar and fats. And it’s not just sugar you need to watch out for as increased carbs and fats in your diet may also contribute to higher blood sugar levels. Too confusing? Here’s a list of 20 foods that you need to avoid if you have diabetes. 20 Foods To Stay Away From 1. Dried Fruit The high fiber content and nutrients might make dried fruit look like a healthy option but you might want to reconsider if your have Type 2 diabetes. Dried fruit undergoes dehydration which causes it’s natural sugars to get very concentrated. Though it’s a better snacking option when compared to cookies, it will still send your blood sugar soaring. Just have some fresh fruit like strawberries or grapefruit instead. 2. White Rice, Bread, And Flour While most diabetics are wary of sugar, they usually don’t keep a tab on eating carbs. Low quality carbs like rice and foods made with white flour, like bread and pasta, act similar to sugar once the digestive process begins. This means that they with interfere with body’s glucose levels. Switching to whole grains such as oatmeal, barley, and brown rice will help in keeping the bad carbs in check. 3. Full-Fat Dairy Most people know that full-fat dairy products contain saturated fat that can increase your bad cholesterol (LDL) and increase the risk of heart disease. As a diabetic, you should also avoid dairy products like cream, full-fat yogurt, ice-cream, and cream cheese that’s made with whole milk. The reason being saturated fats have also been found to increase insul Continue reading >>

The Dairy Connection: Type 2 Diabetes And Lactose

The Dairy Connection: Type 2 Diabetes And Lactose

The subject of this article offers a few different scenarios: 1. to determine your risk of developing type 2 diabetes when you are lactose intolerant. 2. If you already have Type 2 diabetes what is your chance/ risk of developing lactose intolerance. Dairy reduce the risk of developing Type 2 diabetes as well as managing glucose levels in those who have Type 2 diabetes. Along with helping to control glucose levels, dairy products contain many nutrients that are vital to developing healthy bones and teeth. However, there are individuals who are not able to consume dairy products in the recommended amounts because their bodies are not able to break down lactose. Lactose is found in milk and milk products and someone who is lactose intolerance finds it difficult to consume dairy products. This intolerance can be managed by working with a dietitian to properly limit dairy intake or possibly taking a supplement. Benefits of a Diet that Includes Dairy Products Dairy is an important part of a nutritious diet because it often offers healthy sources of protein, calcium, potassium, and vitamin D. Each of these nutrients plays a significant role in maintaining a healthy body. Calcium is required for healthy teeth and bones. In most American diets, dairy products are the main source of calcium. Potassium is important because it is helpful in maintaining a healthy blood pressure. Further reading: Vitamin D allows the body to maintain the appropriate levels of calcium which makes it an essential vitamin in the diet. When dairy products are consumed regularly, there is a reduced risk of osteoporosis, cardiovascular disease, high blood pressure, and Type 2 diabetes. Full Fat Dairy vs Low Fat When choosing dairy products at a grocery store, you will find that there are many different ch Continue reading >>

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

What Is The Best Milk For People With Diabetes?

Whether served with cereal or an afternoon snack, milk is a dairy product that's a common part of many people's diets. But for those with diabetes, milk's carbohydrate count can impact blood sugar. Milk contains lactose, a natural sugar or carbohydrate the body uses for energy. An 8-ounce serving of milk has 12 grams of carbohydrate. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommend eating between 45 and 60 grams of carbohydrate per meal. A standard glass of milk will then represent one-third to one-fourth of a recommended carbohydrate intake for a meal. While cow's milk offers calcium and taste benefits to those with diabetes, its impact on blood sugar may make other choices better ones. Milk nutrition facts for people with diabetes Many milk options can be found at the grocery store. These include varying percentages of cow's milk to rice milk to almond milk. Consider the nutrition facts for some of the following milk options (all serving sizes are for one cup, or 8 ounces, of milk): Calories: 149 Fat: 8 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 276 milligrams Calories: 91 Fat: 0.61 grams Carbohydrate: 12 grams Protein: 8 grams Calcium: 316 milligrams Calories: 39 Fat: 2.88 grams Carbohydrate: 1.52 grams Protein: 1.55 grams Calcium: 516 milligrams Calories: 113 Fat: 2.33 grams Carbohydrate: 22 grams Protein: 0.67 grams Calcium: 283 milligrams While these aren't the only milk options for those with diabetes, they show how there are many different types of milk. Each milk type has its own qualities, from more to less calcium and more to fewer carbohydrates. For example, almond milk has nearly zero carbohydrates while both whole and skim milk have 12 grams of carbohydrates. Some varieties of almond milk also have more calcium per cup than dairy milk does. So Continue reading >>

Dairy Products And Type 2 Diabetes: Protective Or Harmful?

Dairy Products And Type 2 Diabetes: Protective Or Harmful?

It is recommended that we should eat dairy products such as milk, cheese and yoghurt as part of a healthy diet. Because these foods are high in protein and calcium, moderate consumption of low-fat dairy products is thought to be important for growth, repair and strong bones. However, some recent studies have suggested that eating dairy products might not be as good for us as previously thought. A study published last week suggested that drinking three or more glasses of milk a day may be linked to increased fracture risk, and a Swedish investigation found a lower incidence of lung, breast and ovarian cancer in those with lactose intolerance – people who avoid consuming dairy products – compared with their lactose-tolerant relatives and the general population. Evidence from a recent meta-analysis suggests that overall dairy product intake protects against the development of type 2 diabetes, but contrasting findings have been reported on the effect of saturated fat found in dairy products on diabetes risk. A high level of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol in the diet is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, but recent findings suggest that the specific type of saturated fatty acid – “odd chain” or “even chain” – may be important in determining risk. Can yogurt prevent diabetes? The relationship between dairy products and type 2 diabetes is indeed complex, and in a study published today in BMC Medicine, Frank Hu and colleagues from Harvard School of Public Health addressed the question of which specific dairy products are linked to diabetes risk. The authors analyzed data from three large cohort studies, HPFS, NHS and NHS II, and carried out an updated meta-analysis. Overall, the authors found no association between total dairy consumption and type 2 d Continue reading >>

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

Can I Drink Milk If I Have Diabetes

One of the most controversial issues in the nutrition community is whether milk consumption is healthy or an agent of disease. And what if you have diabetes – should you steer clear of milk? Short answer: it depends. This article will help you determine whether to consume milk or not and how to make the best choices if you decide to include dairy products in your diet. What is milk made of? Before we get started on the factors to consider before consuming milk, it can help to understand the composition of milk. In a nutshell, cow’s milk contains water and about 3 to 4% of fat, 3.5% of protein, 5% of a natural sugar called lactose as well as various minerals and vitamins. The following table shows the nutritional composition of various types of milk. As you can see from the table above, compared to human milk, animal milk contains a significantly higher amount of protein. That’s because calves need to grow much faster than babies and thus require much more protein. Is consuming milk from another species an issue? Keep reading to find out. Milk consumption and Type 1 diabetes – is there a link? There have been some controversial studies that have associated cow’s milk consumption with juvenile onset diabetes, more commonly known as type 1 diabetes. Scientists have found that the protein composition of cow’s milk, especially the A1 beta-casein molecule, is radically different from that of human milk and can be extremely hard to digest for humans. Although more research is needed, studies suggest that this A1 beta-casein along with bovine insulin present in cow’s milk can trigger an autoimmune reaction in genetically susceptible children who have a particular HLA (human leukocyte antigen) complex. This autoimmune reaction causes the body to produce antibodies Continue reading >>

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Can People With Type 2 Diabetes Eat Dairy Products?

Not particularly but the fat in whole milk may contribute to obesity which will complicate diabetes. If you must drink milk, drink skim or 1%. By the way, whole (cow's) milk contains 4% fat so 2% is not that much better -- it's not 2% of 4%. Low-fat cheeses and plain yogurt (with or without real fruit) is ok in moderation. Yes. In fact, you can pretty much eat any food if you have diabetes. But you need to know how much of that food you can eat and how often you can eat it. Dairy foods, such as milk and yogurt, contain carbohydrate, along with protein and maybe some fat. Carbohydrate has the most effect on blood glucose, compared to protein and fat. One cup of milk and six ounces of light-style yogurt each contain about 15 grams of carb, about as much as in a slice of bread or a piece of fruit. So if you want to drink milk or eat yogurt, you need to "count" them in your meal plan as one of your carb choices. Other dairy foods, like cheese, eggs and butter are mostly protein and/or fat, so they're counted differently in your meal plan. Cheese and butter tend to be high in saturated fat, a type of fat that can raise cholesterol levels, so it's wise to limit your intake of these foods, and choose lower fat cheeses and trans-fat free tub margarine, instead. Of course, if you have a lactose intolerance or a milk allergy, you may need to avoid some dairy foods. A dietitian can help you figure out how much of any food you can eat, as well as give you guidance on how much carbohydrate, protein and fat to aim for at your meals. Continue reading >>

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