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Are Butternut Squash Good For Diabetics?

Can Diabetics Eat Yellow Squash?

Can Diabetics Eat Yellow Squash?

A large pile of yellow crookneck squash.Photo Credit: JannHuizenga/iStock/Getty Images Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University. Yellow squash is a general term for a variety of summer squashes that come in shapes that include crookneck, zucchinilike and patty pan. A source of vitamin C, vitamin A, lutein and zeaxanthin, yellow squash can be a regular component of a healthy diet for people with diabetes to control blood sugar levels. Many individuals with diabetes should consume 45 to 60 grams of carbohydrates per meal to reduce unhealthy fluctuations in blood sugar levels. A cup of cooked yellow squash contains 6.8 grams of carbohydrates. For breakfast, you could have egg whites scrambled with yellow squash, a whole-grain English muffin and a small pear. Lunch could include soup made with low-sodium beef broth, yellow squash and other vegetables, and 1/2 cup of kidney beans. Have a container of plain, fat-free yogurt and some berries for dessert. For dinner, serve grilled chicken breast with one-half of a large baked potato, yellow squash and a slice of whole-wheat bread. Yellow squash can be healthy for individuals with diabetes because each cup of cooked crookneck squash provides 2 grams of dietary fiber. Dietary fiber helps lower blood sugar levels after you eat a meal, and you should try to consume 14 grams of fiber per 1,000 calories in your diet, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans. Make a high-fiber side dish with yellow squash, black beans, red bell peppers, chili power and cumin. Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Butternut Squash - Good Or Bad?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I eat quite a bit of butternut squash tonight, because I thought it was low-carb (it is in the Collins carb book), but when I found it in the Fat, Calorie and Carb Bible, it said it was much higher. I've googled it, but every site seems to have a different carb value for it. Can anyone give me a definitive carb content for 100g? As far as its effect on me, my BGs were in single figures (just) after 2 hours and on their way down within three, so not ideal, but certainly not the worst thing I've eaten recently! I guess I'll try a smaller portion in future, but it would be good to know the carb value so I can work out my insulin better. Collins carb counter gives 2 g carb per 100 g - negligible. What do you eat with it to raise your BG ????????????? I would stick with the Calorie Carb & Fat Bible. (2010) Butternut Squash. Baked. Average........7.4g carbs per 100g. Fairly high for a Veg. This one similar......8.3g per 100g. (2011) We have had too many examples of the Collins Gem Books having glaring mistakes in them over the years. I no longer trust them as they don't even answer e-mails asking about the discrepancy...seems they want your money but after that you are on your own ! Very poor customer service....... So....CC&FB for me every time, it's one I trust. Google "nutrition info" for a food and you'll usually find the FDA site which is pretty good. You jst have to know to remove the fibre from your calculation. Americans have it in with the carbs[which chemically it is, but it's not digestible] Butternut squash is a good source of fiber and potassium too, my wife makes a mean soup and its absolutely delicious. I like them sliced and drizzled with Ol Continue reading >>

Recipe - Butternut Squash Soup - Recipes For Diabetics

Recipe - Butternut Squash Soup - Recipes For Diabetics

1. Place the ginger and wine in a small pot. Bring to a simmer. Remove from heat and steep while you prepare the soup. 2. In a large pot, cook the onions, celery, and garlic in 1/2 cup of the stock until the onion is wilted. 3. Add the remaining stock and squash and bring to a simmer. Continue to simmer until the squash is tender adding more stock or water as needed. 4. Using a food processor or blender, puree squash mixture until smooth. If using a food processor do this in batches so the machine does not overflow. 6. Drain the wine and discard the ginger. Add the wine to the soup. 7. Reheat (do not allow to boil to avoid curdling) and serve with a dollop of yogurt and a sprinkling of chives. Per serving: 93 calories (0% calories from fat), 4 g protein, 0 total fat (0 saturated fat), 18 g carbohydrates, 4 g dietary fiber, 0 cholesterol, 43 mg sodium Diabetic exchanges: 1 carbohydrate (bread/starch) There are no reviews for this recipe. Log in or register to review this recipe. Continue reading >>

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

The 10 Best Carbs For Diabetics

Forget what you've been told—a diabetes diagnosis does not mean you've been sentenced to a life without carbs. Well, doughnuts may be off the list, but the right carbs can and should be part of a balanced diet for everyone, explains Anna Taylor, RD, a registered dietitian at Cleveland Clinic. In fact, for those with (type 1 or 2) diabetes, getting enough good-for-you carbs is essential for keeping blood sugar levels under control. The key is to pick carb-containing foods that are also rich in fiber and/or protein, nutrients that actually slow the digestion and absorption of carbohydrates, resulting in a more gradual rise and fall of blood sugar levels. Here are Taylor's top 10 diabetes-friendly carb picks, all of which pack additional nutrients that can help prevent chronic conditions or diabetes complications down the line. Lentils and Beans gettyimages-84763023-lentils-zenshui-laurence-mouton.jpg Lentils and beans are excellent sources of protein and fiber. The 19 grams of carbs from a half cup serving of cooked lentils come with 9 grams of protein and 8 grams of fiber (3 grams per serving is considered a "good" source of fiber; 5 and up is considered an "excellent" source, per FDA guidelines). One thing to note: You get the same benefits from canned beans as you do from cooked, dried beans—but you may want to rinse them first, which can eliminate more than 40% of the sodium. (Diabetes doesn't have to be your fate; Rodale's new book, The Natural Way To Beat Diabetes, shows you exactly what to eat and do to prevent the disease—and even reverse it.) Peas Black-eyed, split, and classic green peas have protein and fiber benefits similar to those of beans and lentils. One cup of green peas (before cooking) packs 8 grams of protein, 7 grams of fiber, and 21 grams of c Continue reading >>

Is Squash Good For You Or Not?

Is Squash Good For You Or Not?

The subject who is truly loyal to the Chief Magistrate will neither advise nor submit to arbitrary measures. The question: Is squash a vegetable or a starch? I was told it was off limits because it's high carb. The answer: Squash is a vegetable and, in my opinion, it's a vegetable you shouldn't declare off limits. Yes, it's true that winter squashes such as acorn, butternut, buttercup, hubbard and pumpkin are starchy vegetables and, as such, they contain more carbohydrates than vegetables like leafy greens, cauliflower and bell peppers. (Zucchini and other summer squashes are non-starchy vegetables and are low in carbohydrate.) One-half cup of cooked butternut squash, for example, has 11 grams of carbohydrate and 41 calories while the same sized serving of cooked broccoli has 5.6 grams of carbohydrate and 27 calories. But those extra carbs shouldn't stop you from eating winter squash. For starters, an extra 5.5 grams of carbohydrate isn't much it's the carb equivalent of 1/8 cup of cooked pasta (1 cup of cooked pasta has 44 grams of carbohydrate). In terms of nutrition, winter squash is a far cry from refined starchy foods (the type of carbohydrate foods you should limit). Unlike white bread and other refined flour products, winter squash is a good source of potassium and fibre. What's more, some types are packed with beta- and alpha-carotene, antioxidants thought to help prevent heart disease and certain types of cancer. Higher intakes of alpha-carotene have also been linked to a lower risk of dying from upper digestive tract cancers, type 2 diabetes and chronic lower respiratory disease. There's no official recommended intake for beta-carotene (or alpha-carotene for that matter) but experts contend that consuming 3 to 6 milligrams per day will maintain blood levels o Continue reading >>

What Are Good Vegetable Choices If I Have Diabetes?

What Are Good Vegetable Choices If I Have Diabetes?

What are good vegetable choices if I have diabetes? Looking for a diabetes-friendly food? Follow Popeye's example. Spinach, kale, chard, and other leafy greens are loaded with vitamins, such as folate; minerals, such as magnesium; a range of phytonutrients; and insoluble fiber -- all of which have virtually no impact on your blood sugar level. Mark Hyman, MD, author of The Blood Sugar Solution, calls leafy greens "free foods," which means you should eat as many of them as you can. Bonus: The fiber in leafy greens will slow absorption of any carbohydrates (e.g., potatoes or bread) they're paired with, resulting in a healthier overall glycemic load. Asparagus is a good vegetable choice because it is high in vitamins A and C, low in fat, and a good source of fiber. Another great option is any type of squash. Squash can be eaten year-round because there are winter varieties as well as summer ones. Summer squash has soft outer rinds (like zucchini). Winter squash has hard outer rinds (like pumpkin). Squash contains vitamin A, vitamin C, some B vitamins, iron, and calcium. Winter squash is especially high in vitamin A. Whether you serve steamed or grilled zucchini (squash) as a side dish or as a main part of your meal, it's a very nutritious addition to your menu planning. Diabetes mellitus (MEL-ih-tus), often referred to as diabetes, is characterized by high blood glucose (sugar) levels that result from the bodys inability to produce enough insulin and/or effectively utilize the insulin. Diabetes ... is a serious, life-long condition and the sixth leading cause of death in the United States. Diabetes is a disorder of metabolism (the body's way of digesting food and converting it into energy). There are three forms of diabetes. Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disease that a Continue reading >>

Is Butternut Squash A Complex Carbohydrate?

Is Butternut Squash A Complex Carbohydrate?

Is Butternut Squash a Complex Carbohydrate? Butternut squash is a starchy vegetable rich in complex carbohydrates. The tough, beige rind covering butternut squash protects the sweet, nutritious vegetable inside for up to three months when stored in a cool area of your kitchen. This bright orange, heart-healthy vegetable provides beta-carotene to your meal plan, as well as vitamin C, fiber and complex carbohydrates. Benefit from the nutrition in butternut squash by freezing it after cooking and adding it to your meals all year long. Not all carbohydrates are equal as far as nutrition goes. Simple carbohydrates contain refined sugars that have no nutritional value and, generally, a high calorie count, such as candy, soda and sweetened desserts. On the other hand, complex carbohydrates provide your diet with nutritional fiber, vitamins and minerals from whole grains and starchy vegetables. The recommended daily allowance of carbohydrates is 130 grams for both men and women. One cup of cubed butternut squash contains more than 16 grams of complex carbohydrates. One cup of butternut squash, cut into cubes, has less than 0.15 grams of total fat, making it a healthy choice to help prevent heart disease. The zero cholesterol in butternut squash can help lower your risk of stroke and heart attack. High cholesterol is a major factor in heart disease caused by diet, age and family medical history, according to the American Heart Association. Not only is butternut squash heart-healthy, it is low in calories with 63 in 1 cup. The beta-carotene in butternut squash converts the pigments in the squash into vitamin A. Butternut squash provides almost 750 micrograms of vitamin A to your diet, which is more than the recommended daily intake of 700 micrograms. Vitamin A is essential for h Continue reading >>

What's In Season: Butternut Squash

What's In Season: Butternut Squash

Perfect for adding some colour to your plate, butternut squash is aversatile ingredient that goes a long way whether roasted, mashed or blended. Technically a fruit, in the same family as courgettes and pumpkins, it's the most common winter squash. Although it varies in shape and size, it tends tobe a large pear shape with a tan exterior and a creamy, sweet orange flesh. A good source of vitamins A and C, butternut squash is at itsbest in the UK from September to December. It can also help you increase your daily dietary fibre intake. Here are our top tips on buying, storing, preparing and cooking this seasonalfavourite... How a squash looks will tell you a lot about how its going to taste. Look for onethats a matt tan/beige colour all over, with firm and unbroken skin. Weight is alsoimportant it should be heavy for its size, as this indicates a high moisture content. If you want to extend the life of your squash, keep it in a cool, dry, well-ventilatedarea, where itll keep for at least three months. If you store it in a fridge or at roomtemperature, use it within a couple of weeks. With its awkward shape and tough skin, it can be difficult to peel a butternutsquash, so take care. If your knife isnt sharp enough, try piercing the squasha couple of times with a fork and microwaving it for two minutes to softenthe skin. How to peel and deseed: Cut off the stem and bottom end of the squash sothat both ends are flat, then slice it in half (ideally at the point where thethinner end of the squash begins to widen). Place each half of the squash ona chopping board, flat side down, and peel with a knife or peeler. Keeppeeling until all of the green lines which can be tough have disappearedand all that remains is the orange flesh. Cut the fatter piece of squash in halflengthways Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash Soup

Butternut Squash Soup

2 packages (10 ounces each) frozen pured butternut squash, thawed 1 can (10 3/4 ounces) condensed reduced-sodium chicken broth, undiluted Heat oil in large saucepan over medium-high heat. Add onion and bell pepper; cook 5 minutes, stirring occasionally. Add squash, broth, nutmeg, and white pepper; bring to a boil over high heat. Reduce heat; cover and simmer 15 minutes or until vegetables are very tender. Pure soup in saucepan with hand-held immersion blender or in batches in food processor or blender. Return soup to saucepan. Stir in half-and-half; heat through. Add additional half-and-half, if necessary, to thin soup to desired consistency. Serving Suggestion: Garnish with a swirl of fat-free half-and-half or a sprinkling of fresh parsley. Tip: Butternut squash is a type of winter squash, and is an excellent source of beta-carotene. Its also a very good source of vitamin C, potassium, and dietary fiber. Yield: 4 servings. Serving size: 1 1/2 cups soup. Calories: 152 calories, Carbohydrates: 28 g, Protein: 6 g, Fat: 3 g, Saturated Fat: 1 g, Cholesterol: 13 mg, Sodium: 155 mg, Fiber: 3 g Exchanges per serving: 2 Bread/Starch, 1/2 Fat. Disclaimer Statements: Statements and opinions expressed on this Web site are those of the authors and not necessarily those of the publishers or advertisers. The information provided on this Web site should not be construed as medical instruction. Consult appropriate health-care professionals before taking action based on this information. Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash: Health Benefits, Uses, And Possible Risks

Butternut Squash: Health Benefits, Uses, And Possible Risks

Butternut squash is one of the most common varieties of winter squash. It also offers a good supply of vitamin A, potassium, and fiber. Contrary to the name, winter squash is grown in the summer and harvested in the fall. Its thick, tough exterior and firm flesh make it suitable for storing over several months. This means it can be eaten during the winter season. This is one of a collection of articles on the health benefits of popular foods. Here are some key points about butternut squash. More detail is in the main article. Butternut squash, or winter squash, is harvested in the fall but it keeps well for several months. It is a good source of fiber, potassium , and several other key nutrients. The nutritional content of squash makes it beneficial for digestion, blood pressure , and for healthy skin and hair, among others. Squash can enhance or form the basis of a range of sweet and savory dishes. The butternut squash packs some great health benefits and can fit into a wide range of meals. According to the United States Department of Agriculture (USDA) National Nutrient Database, one cup of cooked, cubed butternut squash, containing around 205 grams, contains: The recommended daily allowance of vitamin A is 900 mcg for men and 700 mcg for women. For vitamin C is it 90 mg for men and 75 mg for women. Butternut squash is also a good source of vitamin E, thiamin, niacin, vitamin B-6, folate , pantothenic acid, and manganese. A cup of cubed butternut squash also provides 582 mg of potassium, more than the amount available in a banana . Fruits and vegetable consumption has been associated with a reduced risk of many adverse health conditions. Consuming plant foods, such as butternut squash, decreases the risk of obesity , diabetes , heart disease , and overall mortality. Continue reading >>

Buttercup Vs Butternut Squash | Diabetic Connect

Buttercup Vs Butternut Squash | Diabetic Connect

Just thought I'd share thisThanksgiving is only a few months away! :) My husband actually found out about this squash online, and I wanted to share it with you. Buttercup squash has about 1/2 the calories and 1/2 the sugar of buttercup squash. It tastes just like butternut squash, ( a favorite in the North East, as least), cooks the same way, is just as filling, has fiber, and is good for you. It is locally grown here in NY. If your grocer doesn't carry it, feel free to ask him to do so! I love this food, and don't have to feel guilty about eating it. Enjoy! :) I have prediabetes so Im trying to change my diet a bit and lose 10 pounds.Ive always enjoyed making buttercup soup from buttercup squash.I liked having it quite regularly,3 times a week for lunch but then a friend tell me to avoid it beacuse its too starchy and sugary so i switched to lentil soup which i make with lentils.I always get these squashes mixed upbutternut and buttercup.. :) Ive never tried accorn squash,,,Ive seen it in the stores..I havent had any buttercup since i was told I had prediabetes..but I may go back to it or some other squash According to the nutritional info i just provided, you'd be way better off with the lentils. Praying success to you in you beating back your prediabetes. "Buttercup squash has about 1/2 the calories and 1/2 the sugar of buttercup squash." Sorry, Jameslet me re-phrasebutterCUP has less calories and sugar than butterNUT. Sorry for the confusion. :( I was so anxious to share this find that I forgot to check my spelling. I will be more careful in the future. :) I believe that was a typo, as the comparison was between butter nut and buttercup squashes. I looked at Self nutrition Data for info on Butternut squash, and for 1 cup mashed (240 g) the carb count is 24 g. Calor Continue reading >>

Butternut Squash Gratin

Butternut Squash Gratin

This rich side dish is oh-so-creamy and satisfyingly cheesy but 1 serving is still less than 100 calories. Prep Time: 15 minutes Cook Time: 70 minutes Serving Size: 1/8 of casserole (3 1/4 x 4 1/2-inch rectangle) 1/2 cup shredded Parmesan cheese, divided Preheat the oven to 375 degrees F. Cut the squash in half lengthwise and place it face down in a 9x13-inch baking dish. Pour the water over the squash and bake for 45 minutes. Remove the squash from the pan and drain the water. Coat the baking dish with cooking spray. Remove the seeds and scoop the flesh of the squash out of the skin. Add the squash flesh back to the prepared baking dish, breaking it up into even sized pieces. Add oil to a saut pan over medium heat. Add the flour and stir to combine. Cook the oil and flour mixture for two minutes then whisk in the fat-free half and half. Bring to a boil, whisking frequently. Stir in 1/4 cup of the parmesan cheese, the ground black pepper and the thyme. Stir until cheese is melted. Pour the sauce over the butternut squash and sprinkle the remaining 1/4 cup of cheese over the top. Bake for 25 minutes or until golden brown and bubbling. Choices: 1/2 Starch 1/2 Fat-Free Milk, 1/2 Fat Continue reading >>

Spicy Butternut Squash Soup

Spicy Butternut Squash Soup

This spicy winter warmer is delicious served with crusty bread. Each 606g serving contains (excludes serving suggestion) slice chilli and coriander leaves, to garnish Heat the oil in a saucepan. Add the onion, chilli and garlic, and fry for 4-5 minutes until softened. Add the squash and continue to fry for 5 minutes. Stir in the curry paste and fry for a further minute. Pour 500ml boiling water over the squash, crumble in the stock cube and bring to the boil. Cover and simmer for 15-20 minutes, until the squash is tender. Transfer to a food processor or blender and blend until smooth. Return to the pan, add the coconut milk and coriander. Heat through and serve sprinkled with black pepper. Garnish with a slice of chilli and torn coriander leaves. If you don't like things too spicy, omit the chilli and use a mild curry paste or powder instead. You could make this soup with sweet potato instead of butternut squash. Freezing instructions:Freeze in portions then defrost in the fridge, or defrost in a microwave taking care to stir regularly. Someone is diagnosed with diabetes every two minutes. Your donation can change lives. Continue reading >>

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

What Should I Eat If I Have Type 2 Diabetes?

Q. Newly diabetic (Type 2). What can I eat and what shouldn’t I eat? Will one day matter? — risa59, Upstate N.Y. A. With all forms of diabetes, the goal is consistent management of your blood sugar to prevent the long-term damage to nerves, blood vessels and organs that can result from uncontrolled diabetes. When you have Type 2 diabetes, your body does not make enough insulin or is unable to use it well. Overeating, particularly high carbohydrate foods like many of those served at Thanksgiving, will cause your blood sugar to rise. Even in the short-term, this can cause headaches, fatigue and leave you feeling generally lousy. Thanksgiving is just one day, but you will feel better and enjoy the holiday more if you pay attention to what and how much you eat. This doesn’t mean you have to miss out on your favorite foods. Hopefully, you are working with your doctor or a dietitian and learning about monitoring your blood sugar, counting carbohydrates in foods and staying active. For Thanksgiving, feel free to taste everything, but pay attention to portion size and limit your intake of high-carbohydrate foods. Remember that drinks like alcoholic beverages and eggnog are loaded with sugars, so it’s often a good idea to skip these and drink water since the table is likely to be filled with many of your favorite high-carb foods. Many diabetes educators advise patients to use a plate strategy during holiday time. Fill half of your 9-inch plate with nonstarchy vegetables — this includes salad, broccoli, cauliflower, Brussels sprouts, turnips, carrots and others. (You can find list of nonstarchy vegetables here.) Reserve a quarter of your plate for the turkey, but leave off the skin. The remaining quarter of your plate can include dollops of your favorite starchy foods l Continue reading >>

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

The 16 Best Foods To Control Diabetes

Figuring out the best foods to eat when you have diabetes can be tough. The main goal is to keep blood sugar levels well-controlled. However, it's also important to eat foods that help prevent diabetes complications like heart disease. Here are the 16 best foods for diabetics, both type 1 and type 2. Fatty fish is one of the healthiest foods on the planet. Salmon, sardines, herring, anchovies and mackerel are great sources of the omega-3 fatty acids DHA and EPA, which have major benefits for heart health. Getting enough of these fats on a regular basis is especially important for diabetics, who have an increased risk of heart disease and stroke (1). DHA and EPA protect the cells that line your blood vessels, reduce markers of inflammation and improve the way your arteries function after eating (2, 3, 4, 5). A number of observational studies suggest that people who eat fatty fish regularly have a lower risk of heart failure and are less likely to die from heart disease (6, 7). In studies, older men and women who consumed fatty fish 5–7 days per week for 8 weeks had significant reductions in triglycerides and inflammatory markers (8, 9). Fish is also a great source of high-quality protein, which helps you feel full and increases your metabolic rate (10). Fatty fish contain omega-3 fats that reduce inflammation and other risk factors for heart disease and stroke. Leafy green vegetables are extremely nutritious and low in calories. They're also very low in digestible carbs, which raise your blood sugar levels. Spinach, kale and other leafy greens are good sources of several vitamins and minerals, including vitamin C. In one study, increasing vitamin C intake reduced inflammatory markers and fasting blood sugar levels for people with type 2 diabetes or high blood pressure Continue reading >>

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