diabetestalk.net

Are Brazil Nuts Good For You With Diabetes?

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

INTRODUCTION Tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts are packed full of beneficial nutrients for people with diabetes. Eating nuts regularly may even help prevent the onset of diabetes later in life! If you have diabetes, individualised advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian is recommended. WHY ARE NUTS SO GOOD FOR YOU? Nuts are high in so many different vitamins, minerals and nutrients: 1. Healthy fats People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. This risk can be reduced by replacing unhealthy saturated fats in the diet with healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, such as those found in nuts. Some people with diabetes also benefit from replacing some of the carbohydrate rich foods in their diet with foods rich in monounsaturated fats. Nuts have also been shown to improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels of those with diabetes. Nuts high in monounsaturated fat include macadamias, cashews, almonds, pistachios, and pecans. Nuts high in polyunsaturated fat include walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts and Brazil nuts. One type of polyunsaturated fat that is particularly beneficial for the heart is omega-3 – nuts high in omega-3 include walnuts and pecans. 2. Low Glycemic Index Cashews, chestnuts and pecans have a low glycaemic index (GI), which means the carbohydrate they contain is broken down slowly by the body. This results in a slow, steady rise in blood glucose levels, which is beneficial for people with diabetes. While the GI of other nuts has not been tested, all nuts, with the exception of chestnuts, are low in carbohydrate and high in protein. This means they are likely to have a low GI but further research is required t Continue reading >>

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Nuts Will Change Your Life

Last year everyone was talking about how good nuts are for diabetes. This year they’re just as good, and new research shows it. If you aren’t eating lots of nuts yet, I’m going to try to get you started. Nuts are great because they are seeds and fruit combined. They are literally full of life. According to Wikipedia, while fruit seeds are separate from the fruit itself, in nuts (according to the botanical definition of the term), the seeds and fruit (which the seed will use to grow if planted) are bound up together, making them among the most nutritious foods on the planet. New research from Louisiana State University found that people who regularly eat tree nuts — including almonds, macadamias, pistachios, walnuts, and cashews — have lower risks for Type 2 diabetes and heart disease. Their C-reactive protein (a major marker of inflammation) levels were lower. Their HDL (“good cholesterol”) levels were higher. According to The Huffington Post, the study was funded by the International Tree Nut Council Nutrition Research & Education Foundation. Study results often show what the funders wanted them to show, but I tend to believe this one. It appeared in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition and was based on analyzing data from NHANES, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey, the gold standard for this kind of study in the US. This research confirms dozens of other studies. As Web Editor Diane Fennell wrote in 2011, “Nuts are well known for their nutritional benefits, including their high levels of heart-healthy fats, protein, antioxidants…, plant sterols (natural substances found in plants that can help lower cholesterol), fiber, and minerals.” Nutritionist Amy Campbell explained in this article that nuts are good because they h Continue reading >>

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Nuts And Seeds Address 4 Problems | Reverse Diabetes

Author Sidebar: I didn't really care that much for nuts (or seeds) as a snack. I preferred potato chips or pretzels; or, a piece of fruit such as an apple or some grapes. But, after I recovered from my coma and returned to work, I realized that I needed something healthier than potato chips for a snack. :-) I started with salted, roasted peanuts; but, after doing some research, I discovered that roasted nuts tended not to be healthy because the heat caused damaged to the healthy fats within the nuts. In addition, I discovered that peanuts were one of the least healthy nuts. So, I gradually transitioned to raw nuts (no salt, not roasted), mainly almonds, pecans and walnuts; and, sometimes macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, and pumpkin seeds. Beyond helping with blood pressure, cholesterol, weight gain, and other health issues, there are 4 major problems that nuts and seeds help address to have them quality as super fats that help reverse your diabetes. 1. Healthy Snacks: is key to help diabetics maintain proper glucose control, especially between major meals. Eating nuts and seeds make it a lot easier to prepare quick and healthy snacks. 2. Healthy Fats: is one of the areas where many diabetics are lacking from a nutrient content perspective. Nuts and seeds provide monounsaturated fats, oleic acid and Omega-3 fats to help address inflammation, oxidation, weight gain, blood glucose levels and insulin levels. 3. Cravings: is a problem area that nuts and seeds can help with because of their macronutrient and micronutrient content, especially the fat, protein and minerals. 4. Eating Fruits: can be better tolerated when eaten with a handful of nuts and seeds. Why? Because the protein and fat in the nuts and seeds offset the carbs in the fruit. Nuts and Seed | Reverse Diabetes| Othe Continue reading >>

Problem Foods: Should Diabetics Eat Nuts?

Problem Foods: Should Diabetics Eat Nuts?

Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a master’s degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. All nuts can be part of a healthy diet. Nuts are made up of protein, vitamins, minerals, fiber, phytochemicals, and fat—the healthy kind of fat. Approximately 50 to 80 percent of a nut is fat, and most of it is healthy monounsaturated and/or polyunsaturated fat. The Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics recommends the healthy adult population should get 20 to 35 percent of their food intake from dietary fat, with increased consumption of polyunsaturated fats and limited intake of saturated fats and trans fats. Regular consumption of nuts and seeds that contain polyunsaturated fats, in particular, can provide health benefits that foods containing saturated and trans fats can’t. The quality of the fat in your diet is just as important as the quantity of fat in your diet. Because nuts are high in fat, they are also high in calories. You can eat nuts (and seeds) to replace servings of meat and poultry, and/or consume nuts in small portions. A good serving size would be equal to a single layer on a square sticky note. Several studies have reported the benefits of walnuts and a variety of other nuts in the diet in relation to cardiac health. Nuts appear to lower lipid levels, decrease inflammation, and decrease blood pressure in those with elevated cholesterol. All of these results translate into a healthier heart. Examples of nuts that are a good source of polyunsaturated fats are walnuts, dried pine nuts, cashews, almonds, pecans, macadamia nuts, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pistachios, and peanuts (peanuts are technically not a nut, but a member of the legume family) Continue reading >>

Brazil Nut Nutrition: 9 Facts About This Healthy Nut

Brazil Nut Nutrition: 9 Facts About This Healthy Nut

Medically reviewed by Peggy Pletcher, MS, RD, LD, CDE on August 3, 2015 Written by Sagan Morrow Nuts and seeds are an important part of many diets. Usually when people plan to supplement their diet with nuts or seeds, they think of walnuts, almonds, chia seeds, or flax seeds. What about the Brazil nut? Does that one come to mind? Dont worry youre not alone! Even though many of us dont think of Brazil nuts as a go-to snack, they can be a tasty and nutritious choice. Here are a few reasons why Brazil nuts should be a staple in your kitchen. The calcium, magnesium, and potassium in Brazil nuts can help to regulate blood pressure, without providing much sodium (as long as they are unsalted). As observed by the Mayo Clinic , this means that Brazil nuts make for a heart-healthy snack! If you want to be healthier, Brazil nuts can support that goal. 2. They can help to lower your cholesterol. The fiber in Brazil nuts can help you lower your cholesterol. This is important, since high cholesterol is associated with heart disease and other heart problems. The Mayo Clinic notes that several studies show a cholesterol-lowering effect from eating nuts regularly. 3. They're a good source of disease-fighting antioxidants. Brazil nuts are a good source of an antioxidant called selenium. According to the Cleveland Clinic , antioxidants help to keep disease at bay, and are specifically linked to a lower risk of heart disease. Its important to note that taking antioxidant supplements does not provide the same benefits as eating foods high in antioxidants which is another good reason to choose Brazil nuts! 4. They decrease your risk for cardiovascular disease. The high quantity of monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats and relatively low saturated fat content can help to decrease your ri Continue reading >>

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

11 Superfoods For Your Diabetes Diet

Getty Images What to Eat to Beat Type 2 Diabetes What makes a food “super”? When it comes to type 2 diabetes, it’s not just about foods that pack lots of nutrients. For a diabetes-friendly diet, you also need foods that will help keep your blood sugar levels in check. “Look for items that contain healthy fats and are high in vitamins, minerals, and fiber,” says Sue McLaughlin, RD, a certified diabetes educator at Burgess Health Center in Onawa, Iowa. It’s also crucial to eat a wide variety of foods to make sure you’re getting a healthy mix of phytochemicals and essential fatty acids. Add these 11 superfoods to your grocery cart to keep your diet diabetes-friendly. Continue reading >>

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Which Nuts Can A Diabetic Eat

Managing diabetes requires a number of lifestyle changes, including becoming more active and making changes in your diet. Often that means saying goodbye to foods you enjoy, but nuts aren't one you need to worry about. Not only can diabetics eat nuts, but they may actually help minimize the impact of some other health issues that often come along with diabetes. Depending on your condition and circumstances, there are several techniques you might use to manage your meals and their impact on your blood sugars and overall health. The American Diabetes Association favors counting the grams of carbs in your diet, while some people with diabetes monitor the glycemic index, or GI, of the foods they eat. If you're trying to lose weight, you might also be on a calorie-restricted plan. Nuts can play a role in your diet, whichever of these strategies you follow: Carb Counting: Most nuts have a low impact on your carb count. An ounce of walnuts contains only 4 grams of carbohydrates, almonds and peanuts have 6 grams, and cashews have 9 grams. Glycemic Index: The Glycemic Index, or GI, measures how quickly a food raises your blood sugar, and the lower the number the better, with any GI below 55 considered "low." Most nuts are very low: The GI of peanuts is 13, for example, and even cashews – relatively high in carbs, for a nut – have a GI of 22. * Calorie Counting: Nuts are more problematic in a weight-loss scenario, because they're high in calories. An ounce of walnuts contains 185 calories, for example, and almonds contain 170. However, their combination of protein, healthy fats and fiber make them a filling and healthful snack, and may help you stay away from less-virtuous foods. Nuts and Health Benefits "First, do no harm" is a fundamental principle in medicine, but nuts go Continue reading >>

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels

54 Grams Of Tree Nuts Per Day Can Drastically Improve Type 2 Diabetes Patients' Blood Sugar Levels Adding nuts to our diet is already considered a good strategy for lowering the risk of heart disease by reducing low-density lipoprotein (LDL), also known as bad cholesterol levels. A recent study conducted at St. Michaels Hospital in Toronto suggests eating tree nuts such as almonds, cashews, and hazelnuts can improve the results of both HbA1c tests and fasting glucose tests for type 2 diabetes patients. "Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern," Dr. John Sievenpiper, physician and researcher in the Clinical Nutrition and Risk Factor Modification Centre of St. Michael's Hospital, said in a statement . Sievenpiper and his colleagues recruited 450 type 2 diabetes patients to participate in 12 clinical trials. People in North America generally consume less than one serving of tree nuts a day, equaling a quarter of a cup or 30 grams. Adding tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, coconuts, hazelnuts, pecans, macadamia nuts, walnuts, pine nuts, and pistachios to our diets could lead to further metabolic benefits. Study participants were asked to consume 54 grams of tree nuts per day. Overall, adding tree nuts to the diets of type 2 diabetes patients improved HbA1c test results, the measurement of blood sugar levels over a period of three months, and fasting glucose levels, which tests blood glucose levels after a patient hasnt eaten or drank anything except water for eight hours. Even though tree nuts can be high in calories and fat, albeit healthy unsaturated fat, the studys participants did not gain weight. The research team identified better results when tree nuts replaced refi Continue reading >>

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating Just Two Servings Of Nuts A Day May Combat Type 2 Diabetes (but Peanuts Won't Help, Say Experts)

Eating nuts may help to combat type 2 diabetes, new research suggest. Two servings of tree nuts a day appears to lower and stabilise blood sugar levels in people with the disease, according to evidence collected from 12 clinical trials. Tree nuts cover most types including walnuts, cashews, hazelnuts and pecans, but exclude peanuts. A single serving was defined as 30 grams. Nut consumption improved two key markers of blood sugar, the results from analysing data on 450 trial participants showed. One, the HbA1c test, measures blood sugar levels over three months. The other, the fasting glucose test, assesses blood sugar after the patient has not eaten for eight hours. The best results were seen when nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. A single serving of tree nuts was defined as about a quarter of a cup, or 30 grams. Participants in the clinical trials were given 56 grams of nuts a day on average. Dr John Sievenpiper from St Michael’s Hospital in Toronto, who led the study, said: ‘Tree nuts are another way people can maintain healthy blood sugar levels in the context of a healthy dietary pattern.’ While nuts are high in fat, it is of the healthier unsaturated variety. Although nuts can be high in calories, trial participants did not gain weight. Continue reading >>

Nuts Good For Fighting Obesity And Diabetes

Nuts Good For Fighting Obesity And Diabetes

The development of obesity and type 2 diabetes can be controlled by a special amino acid, arginine, which is found in nuts. This sensational discovery has just been made by a group of Danish researchers, who have studied how food, especially nuts, containing arginine affects the body. “Our studies show that arginine has a number of positive effects, including removing stomach fat and increasing sensitivity to insulin,” says one of the researchers, Christoffer Clemmensen, a PhD student at the Department of Molecular Drug Research at the University of Copenhagen. Amino acid intake varies with diet The proteins in our food are made up of almost 20 different amino acids, so the composition of amino acids entering our bodies differs according to the foods we eat – from yoghurt to pork crackling to nuts. Arginine is found in many foods, and especially in nuts such as coconuts, pecans, cashews, walnuts, almonds, Brazil nuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts and peanuts. “Together with other amino acids, the arginine we get from our food contributes to the positive impact that arises from eating a diet with the correct protein composition,” says Clemmensen. “But it would be very difficult to eat the arginine quantities that we used in our tests without adding food supplements to our diets.” Transferring the studies to an everyday situation would mean we must eat almost 20 g of arginine – or 800 g of nuts – every single day, he says. “In time, this discovery can lead to drugs aimed at combating obesity and type 2 diabetes.” Mice lost stomach fat Since it is almost impossible to use humans in tests where researchers study how a single amino acid such as arginine affects the body, Clemmensen’s group used mice in two groups, each with ten mice. Over a period of ten week Continue reading >>

The Top 9 Nuts To Eat For Better Health

The Top 9 Nuts To Eat For Better Health

Written by Ruairi Robertson, PhD on December 5, 2016 While they are high in fat, in most cases, it's healthy fat. They're also a good source of fiber and protein. Many studies have shown that nuts have a number of health benefits , especially in regards to reducing risk factors for heart disease. This article discusses different types of nuts and evidence of their health benefits. In general, nuts are good sources of fat, fiber and protein . Most of the fat in nuts is monounsaturated fat, as well as omega-6 and omega-3 polyunsaturated fat. However, they do contain some saturated fat. Nuts also contain a number of vitamins and minerals, including magnesium and vitamin E. Many studies have investigated the health benefits of increased nut intake. One meta-analysis of 33 studies found that diets high in nuts do not significantly affect weight gain or weight loss ( 1 ). But despite having little effect on weight, many studies have shown that people who eat nuts live longer than those who don't. This may be due to their ability to help prevent a number of chronic diseases ( 2 , 3 , 4 , 5 ). For example, nuts may reduce risk factors for metabolic syndrome, such as high blood pressure and cholesterol levels ( 6 , 7 , 8 , 9 ). In fact, one study of over 1,200 people found that eating a Mediterranean diet plus 30 grams of nuts per day decreased the prevalence of metabolic syndrome more than a low-fat diet or a Mediterranean diet with olive oil ( 10 ). Furthermore, nuts may also reduce the risk of other chronic diseases. For example, eating nuts may improve blood sugar levels and even reduce the risk of certain cancers ( 11 , 12 ). This article discusses the nutrient contents of commonly consumed nuts and the evidence for some of their health benefits. Bottom Line: Eating nuts m Continue reading >>

Will Brazil Nuts Raise Risk Of Diabetes?

Will Brazil Nuts Raise Risk Of Diabetes?

Q. I saw a report citing a study published in the Annals of Internal Medicine that tracked 1202 people for 8 years. It showed there was a 50 percent increase in type 2 diabetes in the people taking a supplement of 200 micrograms of selenium. My multivitamin has 100 micrograms, so if I ate just two Brazil nuts, I’d be over the limit. How much should I worry about this? A. The research you refer to was published on Aug. 21, 2007. It did find an increased risk of type 2 diabetes: 58 cases in the selenium-supplemented group compared to 39 cases in the placebo group during the study. The scientists had expected to find a protective effect of selenium supplementation instead of greater risk. A smaller study did not find a link between selenium supplementation and risk of type 2 diabetes, but it lasted only six months (PLoS One, Sept. 19, 2012). In addition, it looked at an intermediate marker, the blood chemical adiponectin, instead of cases of diabetes. There’s no evidence we know of that selenium in your diet will raise your risk of diabetes. To be on the safe side, though, we suggest limiting your Brazil nut consumption; they are quite high in selenium. You should ask your doctor to monitor your blood sugar levels periodically. You can learn a bit more about selenium toxicity (and Brazil nuts) in this earlier People’s Pharmacy post. Continue reading >>

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Eat Nuts To Control Blood Sugar & Fat

Nuts contain unsaturated fats, protein and a range of vitamins and minerals that lower cholesterol, inflammation and insulin resistance. A recent study suggests that you should include at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet to control blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars - two of the five markers for metabolic syndrome. The study was published in the journal BMJ Open. Tree nuts tend to healthier than others. Family of tree nuts includes almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, hickory nuts, macadamia nuts, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios, and walnuts amongst others. A person develops metabolic syndrome if he or she has three of the following risk factors - low levels of "good" cholesterol, high triglycerides, high blood pressure, high blood sugar and extra weight around the waist. By including at least 50 grams of almonds, cashews, chestnuts, walnuts or pistachios in your diet, blood fats (triglycerides) and sugars can be controlled effectively. "Eating tree nuts is good for lowering risk for heart disease and other health problems such as diabetes and strokes," said John Sievenpiper, a physician at St Michael's Hospital in Toronto. However, the greatest benefit can be reaped only if they are consumed daily. The study found a "modest decrease" in blood fats known as triglycerides and blood sugars among people who added tree nuts to their diets compared to those who ate a control diet. To reach this conclusion, Sievenpiper screened 2,000 articles published in peer-reviewed journals and found 49 randomised control trials with 2,000 participants. Sievenpiper says that the largest reductions in triglycerides and blood glucose were seen when tree nuts replaced refined carbohydrates rather than saturated fats. He also a Continue reading >>

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

Foods That Lower Blood Sugar

This is a short list of foods that lower blood sugar. Since controlling blood sugar is one of the most important things you can do to remain healthy and live a long life, you need to learn how to lower a high blood sugar level, and what kind of foods and diet can help you do that. Nuts – Although these tend to be high in fat, it is the good kind of fats, which can actually lower insulin resistance, which means your cells will be more sensitive to the insulin your body produces which will more effectively lower your blood sugar. Also, nuts because of their fat content help in controlling blood sugar by preventing you from becoming hungry between meals, and thus you avoid the sugary snacks that tend to raise your blood sugar. Examples of healthy nuts are: Peanuts Walnuts Almonds Cashews Pecans Brazil Nuts Macadamia Nuts This of course is dependant on whether you have food sensitivities or allergies to certain nuts. If so, do not eat them. However if you do not have any allergies to nuts, make them a regular part of your daily diet. Avocado – This is actually a fruit and contains the healthy fats that raise your insulin sensitivity and is thus another of the foods that lower blood sugar. It is can be used in dips, sauces, and spreads, or as a garnish. Avocados contain fiber to help slow down blood sugar increases when added to a meal. It’s a convenient, tasty, and healthy food that will help in lowering a high blood sugar level. Sweet Potatoes – These are much lower on the glycemic index than regular potatoes due to their higher fiber content. They contain carotenoids, which are powerful antioxidants and are thought to have a positive affect on insulin, and chlorogenic acid, which combats insulin resistance. Don’t negate their value by using sugary sauces or topp Continue reading >>

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Are Nuts Good Or Bad For Diabetes?

Nuts! Can nuts help prevent diabetes? Can nuts help control diabetes? Are nuts a healthy snack or just another fad? Should you include nuts in your diet? The simple answer is yes—though, read on, because there are some caveats (aren’t there always…) to the simple “yes” answer. What are Nuts? Nuts are seeds in a hard shell and are the seeds of various trees. These nuts are commonly called tree nuts. Botanically, nuts are also those where the shell does not break apart to release the nuts—these shells have to get broken to free the nut. However, for the sake of this article, the more general use of nuts—those in hard shells that need to be broken (chestnuts and hazelnuts) and other nuts that technically are legumes (like the peanut) and seeds (eg. Pecans, Almonds) are included. Some of the more common nuts are:[1] Hazelnuts/Filberts Brazil nuts Almonds Cashews Chestnuts Peanuts Pine nuts Walnuts Macadamia nuts Pistachios Coconuts Acorns The USDA’s “Choose My Plate” program designed to help people make healthy eating choices included nuts in the Protein Foods Group, but nuts are high in a number of other nutrients as well, including fiber, the heart healthy monounsaturated and polyunsaturated fats, healthy omega-3 fats, vitamins and minerals. Nuts are also high in anti-oxidants. One thing to note is that nuts are also high in calories. However, while noting that, it is also important to remember that while you DO want to watch your calories, you are getting an awful lot of healthy nutrition along with those calories and are NOT getting a lot of sugars, cholesterol or unhealthy fats (the sorts of unhealthy saturated fats that can clog up arteries). The way you can get the health benefits of nuts without paying a large “calorie price” is to use nuts a Continue reading >>

More in diabetes