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Are Bean Sprouts Good For Diabetes

10 Healthy Snacks For People With Diabetes

10 Healthy Snacks For People With Diabetes

Here are 10 healthy snacks for people with diabetes. World Diabetes Day is celebrated every year on 14th November and is an annual reminder of how this disease is taking over the lives of millions across the globe. The adverse effects of a combination of poor and unhealthy diet, a sedentary lifestyle and long working hours are becoming increasingly worrisome. Diabetes happens to be one of the most dangerous outcomes as it not only puts people at the risk of obesity, heart disease and a stroke, but also triggers an extreme lifestyle change. Diabetes is commonly known as the silent killer and in many cases is diagnosed accidentally. This makes it extremely important that we are aware of the symptoms which can help in an early diagnosis and possible recovery. If you're suffering from diabetes, then it's extremely important to keep a strict watch on your diet. You should eat small and healthy meals through the day in order to keep your blood-sugar levels in check and be sure to not include processed or high fattening food. Instead, find foods that perfectly combine protein, carbohydrates and fats. If you're confused about what to eat or have run out of ideas, then here's a list of 10 super healthy and delicious snacks: 1. Whole grain crackers - Crackers made of cracked wheat, quinoa, rye, oats are healthy as these grains help in lowering blood-glucose levels and cholesterol levels. You can eat crackers with hung curd dressings or cottage cheese to enhance the nutritional value of the snack. It also gives it a more delicious spin. (Recipe by Chef Seema Chandra) 2. Fruits for snacks - Fruits are rich in fiber, vitamins and minerals. So feel free to eat as many as you can. But be sure to select fruits that are relatively low on sugar - like apple, berries and guava. 3.Steamed Continue reading >>

Mung Beans Nutrition & Its Big Benefits!

Mung Beans Nutrition & Its Big Benefits!

Current: Mung Beans Nutrition & Its Big Benefits! Dr. Axe on Facebook1626 Dr. Axe on Twitter26 Dr. Axe on Instagram Dr. Axe on Google Plus Dr. Axe on Youtube Dr. Axe on Pintrest325 Share on Email Print Article Jillian BabcockApril 11, 2015August 10, 2017 Mung beans a type of small, green legume in the same plant family as peas and lentils is a high source of protein, fiber, antioxidants and phytonutrients. Although in most parts of the world theyre less popular than other bean varieties, like chickpeas or black beans , mung beans have some huge health benefits to offer! While mung beans may be new to most people in the U.S, theyve been a part of traditional Ayurvedic diets in India for thousands of years. Mung beans are considered one of the most cherished foods in the ancient Indian practice thats been a traditional form of medicine since roughly 1,500 B.C. These days, mung beans are beginning to pop up in protein powders, canned soups and in restaurant dishes state-side. So heres what you need to know about mung beans: Mung beans are a high source of nutrients including: manganese, potassium, magnesium, folate, copper, zinc and various B vitamins. They are also a very filling food, high in protein , resistant starch and dietary fiber . You can find mung beans in dried powder form, as whole uncooked beans, split-peeled form (just like youd find split green peas), as bean noodles, and also as sprouted seeds (which arethe kind youd see used on sandwiches or salads). Their dried seeds may be eaten raw, cooked (whole or split), fermented, or milled and ground into flour. Because of their high nutrient density, mung beans are considered useful in defending against several chronic, age-related diseases, including heart disease , cancer, diabetes and obesity. Clinical eviden Continue reading >>

Beansprouts/buckwheat

Beansprouts/buckwheat

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Can anyone tell me if these are low carb as I love them and happily have them instead of pasta, potatoes, rice etc - do like zucchini as well but have pain problems with hands so cannot always manage to peel them and slice them up without tears and so beansprouts are an easy option- love them raw and cooked but cannot find anywhere I have looked what carb content they have? Same question about Buckwheat - never had it but have found you can buy crackers in it and wonder if low carb enough if it will help with my terrible bread craving? Sorry am totally new to all this, messed about with Low carb in past but now its serious and my way of life forever so trying to sort out everything I can and cannot eat - I am the type I either love things or hate them and so if its something high carb or even medium carb I have to avoid it for life as I cannot just take a small amount . Thanks, as to the buckwheat I read a article, scientific somewhere ( read so much this past week) bookmarked it but need to find it that said although its high carb as its not a real grain, forget what they called it, the body does not treat it the same and does not convert it to glucose, well not as much. Will keep it on back burner just now. Great about the beansprouts, can eat them any time xxxx You are right,buckwheat is not a grain like wheat or rye but still a seed that is very high indeed in carbs. No gluten though. If you want to try it do so but test thoroughly. I found this article on it: "The nutrients in buckwheat may contribute to blood sugar control. In a test that compared the effect on blood sugar of whole buckwheat groats to bread made from refined wheat flour, buckwhe Continue reading >>

Mung Bean Soaked Water For Diabetes Type Ii

Mung Bean Soaked Water For Diabetes Type Ii

Posted by Stacy (Ghana) on 12/19/2016 Dear P. Raghaven, I am writing to thank you so much on behalf of my sister and myself. Diabetes 2 has ravaged our family, (grandparent & parents)and shortened too many beautiful lives. My sister was told 2 years ago she was pre-diabetic, and struggled with diet restrictions in attempts to lose weight. Despite her efforts, she was unfortunately recently diagnosed with Diabetes 2, I knew we had to get better before it was too late. Seeing your post, I started with the fermented mung beans every morning, although I am not diabetic, I only did this to satisfy my kin that it was safe, and doable. However, I do think this is a very good way to introduce the necessary gut flora which I believe I too am lacking. Then, my sister started it and after one month was dropping weight and clothing sizes as well as drastically reducing her overall body inflammation with only adding this fermented drink each morning, and still eating her usual foods. This is a godsend, thank you thank you, thank you. She has not been back to the doctor and still is taking victoza (sp) but what a transformation. She is determined to continue for the full 12 weeks and tells everyone she knows about this remedy. I only hope we can convince other family members to try it too. Again many blessings to you and other posters here on earth clinic. Continue reading >>

Beans Sprouts & Their Benefits

Beans Sprouts & Their Benefits

Bean sprouts are vegetables that are little-known in Western cuisine. They are often used in Asian dishes such as the traditional Chop Suey dish. Bean sprouts can be used in most of the dishes you cook daily: spaghetti, salad, vegetable stir-fry dishes and so much more. Heres a look at why its a good idea to add sprouts to your daily menu. They help reduce cholesterol levels when eaten every day. They are ideal for people with high cholesterol levels. They help prevent cancer, and more specifically, breast cancer. Bean sprouts are low in sugar, which is good for everyone. One study concluded that after having eaten bean sprouts every day for five weeks, people with type 2 diabetes saw their blood sugar levels drop. They are high in fibre, which helps you stay full. They are very good for people who want to lose weight since they are low in calories, high in fibre, low in cholesterol and high in protein. They provide high vitamin C intake. Vitamin C is a natural antioxidant and provides good eye health. They have a high concentration of iron, which is excellent for people with anemia. Our Oriental bean sprouts are in all supermarkets near you in Quebec and online at Lufa Farms. You will find us mainly in bags like these presented. You will also find us in-store packaging at IGA and Metro. We deploy a lot of energy to market the bags rather than in-store packaging. So we can guarantee that our factory safety will be up to your home. 5 health benefits of mung beans by sequoia Nutritional and health benefits of green mung beans Continue reading >>

What Are Good Foods To Eat On A Diabetic Diet?

What Are Good Foods To Eat On A Diabetic Diet?

Your diabetes-friendly shopping list should include: Vegetables Tip: These nonstarchy veggies can fill the "produce" portion of your plate: Artichokes Asparagus Beets Bell peppers Broccoli Brussels sprouts Cauliflower Carrots Celery Cucumber Eggplant Green beans Jicama Leafy greens Leeks, onions Mushrooms Snow peas Summer squash Tomatoes Zucchini Tip: These starchy veggies can fill the "starch" section of your plate: Corn Green peas Parsnips Potatoes Winter squash Fruit Tip: Opt for fresh, and avoid added sugars if you go with canned or frozen instead. Apples Apricots Berries Bananas Cherries Citrus fruit Grapes Kiwifruit Mangoes Melons Nectarines Peaches Pears Pineapple Plums Seasonings Tip: Research suggests cinnamon, cloves, and allspice may have a stabilizing effect on blood sugar. Fresh herbs (rosemary, basil, mint, cilantro, chives, dill, etc.) Low-sodium spices Vinegars (cider, red wine, rice wine, etc.) For the most part, nutrition guidelines for people with diabetes match what everyone should be doing for their health. You need a balanced diet to get the nutrients you need for good health. (Yes, your mom was right.) Since you have diabetes, this balancing act is even more important -- you need to balance food choices with other parts of your treatment, like your medication and exercise plan. Learning a few basics (like those below) can help you do this. Build a better diet with these 6 basic building blocks: Choose unsaturated fats and oils rather than saturated or trans fats. Include more vegetables and whole fruits in your meals -- they're full of fiber and vitamins. Eat more whole grains like whole-wheat bread, brown rice, and oatmeal. Choose heart-healthy proteins like beans, skinless poultry, and lean meat. Select low-fat dairy products most of the time. L Continue reading >>

Diabetes | Mumm's Sprouting Seeds

Diabetes | Mumm's Sprouting Seeds

The health-relevant functionality of Mucuna pruriens (Fava Bean) was improved by priming the seeds with elicitors of the pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) such as fish protein hydrolysates (FPHs), lactoferrin (LF) and oregano extract (OE) followed by dark germination. FPH elicited the highest phenolic content of 19 mg/g FW on day 1, which was 38% higher than control sprouts. OE enhanced Parkinson's disease-relevant L-DOPA content by 33% on day 1 compared to control sprouts. Anti-diabetes-relevant alpha-amylase inhibition percent (AIP) and alpha-glucosidase inhibition percent (GIP) were high in the cotyledons and decreased following elicitation and sprouting. For potential anti-diabetic applications, low AIP and high GIP with moderate L-DOPA content on day 4 of dark germination could be optimal. Improved L-DOPA concentrations in a soluble phenolic and antioxidant-rich M. pruriens background on day 1 sprouts have potential for Parkinsons disease management. Improved health-relevant functionality in dark germinated Mucuna pruriens (Fava Bean) sprouts by elicitation with peptide and phytochemical elicitors. Bioresour Technol. 2009 Oct;100(19):4507-14. Epub 2009 May 19 Randhir R, Kwon YI, Shetty K. The anti-diabetic effects of Mung bean sprout (MBS) extracts and Mung bean seed coat (MBSC) extracts were investigated in type 2 diabetic mice. Male KK-A (y) mice and C57BL/6 mice were used in this study. In KK-A (y) mice, the blood glucose, plasma C-peptide, glucagon, total cholesterol, triglyceride, and blood urea nitrogen (BUN) levels were significantly higher than those in the C57BL/6 mice ( P < 0.001, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, P < 0.001, P < 0.01, and P < 0.01). In addition, KK-A (y) mice showed an obvious decrease in insulin immunoreactivity in pancreas as well. MBS and MBSC were Continue reading >>

Are Bean Sprouts Good For You?

Are Bean Sprouts Good For You?

Natalie Stein specializes in weight loss and sports nutrition. She is based in Los Angeles and is an assistant professor with the Program for Public Health at Michigan State University. Stein holds a master of science degree in nutrition and a master of public health degree from Michigan State University. Take advantage of bean sprouts to add more vegetables to your diet.Photo Credit: Comstock Images/Stockbyte/Getty Images You can grow any fresh bean until it sprouts, but the most common edible versions are mung bean sprouts, according to the University of Florida. These white-colored beans are essential to many Asian recipes. You can use them cooked or raw in a variety of other dishes, and they can be healthy additions to a balanced diet. Bean sprouts are low in calories. A cup of raw bean sprouts contains only 31 calories. Add raw bean sprouts to wraps, or cook bean sprouts in stir-fry dishes and stews to make each portion bigger and more filling without adding many calories. Eating more calories than you expend can cause unwanted weight gain and lead to obesity, which is a risk factor for cardiovascular, type 2 diabetes and some forms of cancer, according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines. A cup of mung bean sprouts provides 1.9 grams of dietary fiber, making them a potentially significant source of fiber. Healthy adults should consume 14 grams of fiber per 1,000 calories in the diet, or 28 grams of fiber per day on a 2,000-calorie diet. Make a high-fiber chili with kidney and black beans, mung bean sprouts, tomatoes and extra lean ground turkey or soy crumbles. Each cup of raw mung bean sprouts provides 14 milligrams of vitamin C, or 23 percent of the daily value; 34 micrograms of vitamin K, or 43 percent of the daily value; and 63 micrograms of folate, or 16 percent Continue reading >>

Sprouts And Diabetes

Sprouts And Diabetes

You are here: Home > Sprouts and Diabetes Diabetes can be deadly. Please take a look at our research to learn how sprouts can improve the lives of those who suffer from this serious disease. "Antidiabetic activity of Mung bean extracts in diabetic KK-Ay mice." J Agric Food Chem. 2008 Oct 8;56(19):8869-73. Epub 2008 Sep 4. Yao Y, Chen F, Wang M, Wang J, Ren G. Institute of Crop Science, Chinese Academy of Agricultural Sciences, No. 80 South Xueyuan Road, Haidian District, Beijing, People's Republic of China. "Broccoli sprouts powder could improve serum triglyceride and oxidized LDL/LDL-cholesterol ratio in type 2 diabetic patients: A randomized double-blind placebo-controlled clinical trial." Diabetes Res Clin Pract. 2012 Feb 8. Bahadoran Z, Mirmiran P, Hosseinpanah F, Rajab A, Asghari G, Azizi F. Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. "Broccoli sprouts reduce oxidative stress in type 2 diabetes: a randomized double-blind clinical trial" Eur J Clin Nutr. 2011 Aug;65(8):972-7. doi: 10.1038/ejcn.2011.59. Epub 2011 May 11. Bahadoran Z, Mirmiran P, Hosseinpanah F, Hedayati M, Hosseinpour-Niazi S, Azizi F. Obesity Research Center, Research Institute for Endocrine Sciences, Shahid Beheshti University of Medical Sciences, Tehran, Iran. "Cynarin-Rich Sunflower (Helianthus annuus) Sprouts Possess Both Antiglycative and Antioxidant Activities." J Agric Food Chem. 2012 Mar 28;60(12):3260-5. Sun Z, Chen J, Ma J, Jiang Y, Wang M, Ren G, Chen F. Institute for Food and Bioresource Engineering, College of Engineering, Peking University , Beijing 100871, People's Republic of China. "Soaked and germinated Glycine max (soybean seeds) is highly effective blood sugar regulator" Dr. Manju Pathak, B-506 Continue reading >>

Fighting Diabetes – Sprouts Can Help

Fighting Diabetes – Sprouts Can Help

November 14 is World Diabetes Day. On this day 200 diabetic member associations in over 160 different countries observe World Diabetes Day by raising awareness about this disease through meetings and lectures, conferences, sporting events and television and radio programs. Almost 10% of American adults are living with diabetes, and another 86 million are considered pre-diabetic. Diabetes is the 7th leading cause of death in the US, much of it preventable. Developing countries have seen a steady rise in diabetes as they adopt the western diet and lifestyle. Diabetes has become a global problem. There are two main types of Diabetes: Type 1 and type 2. Type 1 occurs when the body fails to produce insulin which is a hormone needed to convert sugar, starches and other foods into energy. This type is usually found in children, and accounts for approximately 5% of diabetics. Type 2 occurs when the pancreas is still capable of making insulin but the body develops an insulin resistance. Eventually the pancreas can’t keep up with the demand for more and more insulin to overcome the body’s resistance. Type 2 diabetes is preventable with lifestyle and dietary changes. This means exercise and a diet rich in healthy foods and lesser amounts of carbohydrates and starches. Sprouts are categorized as a non-starchy vegetable by the American Diabetes Association and are incorporated into some of their suggested recipes for those who are diabetic. These recipes include Mediterranean Roll-ups, Spring Lettuce Rolls, and Fabulous Stir Fry. Besides being part of a healthy diet, sprouts can help in the treatment of disease. A high concentration of medicinal compounds makes sprouts a functional food which can play a part in treating specific diseases. Scientific studies have shown that sprou Continue reading >>

Five Reasons To Add Bean Sprouts To Your Salads

Five Reasons To Add Bean Sprouts To Your Salads

Five reasons to add bean sprouts to your salads Bean sprouts are best known as a topping for dishes like pad Thai and pho, but they have plenty to offer on their own, including bloat-busting fibre Mung beans are small, bright green beans, and bean sprouts are the sprouts that grow from those beans. You may recognize the sprouts from your take-out spring rolls, but they really shine when served raw. The crunchy and delicately sweet bean sprouts are a good source of protein, vitamin C and folic acid. Theyre also high in fibre, making them a great way to add some crunch to your spring salads. Five fantastic reasons to embrace mung beans and bean sprouts 1. They support heart health: Bean sprouts are a great source of potassium, a mineral important for heart muscle contraction and blood pressure regulation . Remember to boost your potassium intake if you are exercising or cleansing to ensure optimal cardiovascular strength. 2. They have vitamin K: The most important role of vitamin K in the body is its ability to assist in blood clotting . This is necessary to prevent excess blood loss, and it is especially important for women of childbearing age in order to avoid anemia. Vitamin K has a regulatory effect, so dont be afraid of bean sprouts even if you suffer from high blood pressure. 3. Theyre a great source of fibre: This includes both the beans and the sprouts. Fibre has been shown in many studies to lower LDL cholesterol levels, even when no other changes are made to the diet! Fibre also promotes hormonal balance and fat loss and is the ultimate cleanser. 4. Theyre high in choline: Choline is in the family of B-vitamins and is necessary for healthy liver detoxification. New studies conducted last year outlined the importance of choline in the brain development of infant Continue reading >>

Why Sprouts Are Good For Diabetics.

Why Sprouts Are Good For Diabetics.

Healthy Recipes > Sprouts > Sprout for Diabetics > Diabetes is known as a silent killer and recently many young adults are also diagnosed with diabetes, the number increasing year by year. For a diabetic, along with medication the diet plays a key role in avoiding its progression. Small and frequent healthy meals which do not raise blood glucose levels rapidly is the main dietary focus. One worthwhile ingredient which is a must addition to a Diabetic meal is SPROUTS. Made by sprouting pulses, they do have some amount of carbohydrate in them. But the process of sprouting them decreases the starch present in them by 10%, thus they contain Low Carbohydrates . Additionally, they are a good source of Fibre which doesnt allow a spike in Blood Sugar Levels . These are the twin reasons for making sprouts a part of diabetic meal plan. However sprouts are often considered boring as they are quote bland. If you are confused about how to cook delicious meals with sprouts to keep a check on your blood sugar levels turn to our well researched recipes like Sprouts Dhokla , Cucumber Bean Sprouts and Apple Salad , Mixed Sprouts and Palak Subzi and many more. To learn how to sprout moong perfectly watch our video. Sprouted and Boiled Moong Continue reading >>

Sprouted Grains

Sprouted Grains

Sprouted grains and foods that contain sprouted grains have been “sprouting up” in grocery and health-food stores lately. Curious about what sprouted grains really are and if you should be eating them? Have you come across “sprouted-grain cereal” or “sprouted-grain bread” in your grocery store and wondered what it is? Food companies that manufacture sprouted-grain products claim that these foods are more nutritious than other grain products and can help improve health. Is there any truth to these claims? What are sprouted grains? First, a bit of background on grains. Grains are the seeds of plants, such as those from cereal grasses. Oats, barley, wheat, corn, and rice are examples of grains. The grain has three edible parts — the germ, endosperm, and bran. The germ is the plant embryo that feeds on the starchy endosperm. The bran layer provides nutrients and some protection, along with the outer husk (that we don’t eat). There are special growth-inhibitors in the grain that keep it from sprouting and turning into a plant until the conditions are just right. When the germ, or embryo, is ready to start sprouting, enzymes kick in and turn the starch of the endosperm into more easily “digested” molecules to help the plant grow. The outer bran of the seed splits open and you can see a small shoot poking out. This is what a sprouted grain looks like! What are the health benefits of sprouted grains? Easier digestion. One of the claims about sprouted grains is that they are easier to digest (at least, for some people) than regular grains. There may be some truth to this. A young plant that still is growing is more easily able to “digest” the endosperm, thanks to those enzymes mentioned above. So, not surprisingly, sprouted grains may be a little easier o Continue reading >>

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

The 15 Best Superfoods For Diabetics

beats1/Shutterstock Chocolate is rich in flavonoids, and research shows that these nutrients reduce insulin resistance, improve insulin sensitivity, drop insulin levels and fasting blood glucose, and blunt cravings. But not all chocolate is created equal. In a 2008 study from the University of Copenhagen, people who ate dark chocolate reported that they felt less like eating sweet, salty, or fatty foods compared to volunteers given milk chocolate, with its lower levels of beneficial flavonoids (and, often, more sugar and fat, too). Dark chocolate also cut the amount of pizza that volunteers consumed later in the same day, by 15 percent. The flavonoids in chocolate have also been shown to lower stroke risk, calm blood pressure, and reduce your risk for a heart attack by 2 percent over five years. (Want more delicious, healthy, seasonal foods? Click here.) Jiri Vaclavek/Shutterstock Broccoli is an anti-diabetes superhero. As with other cruciferous veggies, like kale and cauliflower, it contains a compound called sulforaphane, which triggers several anti-inflammatory processes that improve blood sugar control and protect blood vessels from the cardiovascular damage that’s often a consequence of diabetes. (Heart disease is the leading cause of death for people with diabetes, so this protection could be a lifesaver.) Sulforaphane also helps flip on the body’s natural detox mechanisms, coaxing enzymes to turn dangerous cancer-causing chemicals into more innocent forms that the body can easily release. Blueberries funnyangel/Shutterstock Blueberries really stand out: They contain both insoluble fiber (which “flushes” fat out of your system) and soluble fiber (which slows down the emptying of your stomach, and improves blood sugar control). In a study by the USDA, peopl Continue reading >>

Why Sprouts Are Good For Diabetics.

Why Sprouts Are Good For Diabetics.

Healthy Recipes > Sprouts > Sprout for Diabetics > Diabetes is known as a silent killer and recently many young adults are also diagnosed with diabetes, the number increasing year by year. For a diabetic, along with medication the diet plays a key role in avoiding its progression. Small and frequent healthy meals which do not raise blood glucose levels rapidly is the main dietary focus. One worthwhile ingredient which is a must addition to a Diabetic meal is SPROUTS. Made by sprouting pulses, they do have some amount of carbohydrate in them. But the process of sprouting them decreases the starch present in them by 10%, thus they contain Low Carbohydrates . Additionally, they are a good source of Fibre which doesnt allow a spike in Blood Sugar Levels . These are the twin reasons for making sprouts a part of diabetic meal plan. However sprouts are often considered boring as they are quote bland. If you are confused about how to cook delicious meals with sprouts to keep a check on your blood sugar levels turn to our well researched recipes like Sprouts Dhokla , Cucumber Bean Sprouts and Apple Salad , Mixed Sprouts and Palak Subzi and many more. To learn how to sprout moong perfectly watch our video. Sprouted and Boiled Moong Continue reading >>

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