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Are Bananas Ok For Diabetics To Eat?

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas?

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas?

If you have diabetes, you may have heard that bananas are too sweet or too high in sugar to fit into your diet. This common belief is related to the fact that bananas are high in carbohydrates, which the body converts into sugar, and because they are rumored to have a high glycemic index, a measure of a food’s impact on blood sugar levels. However, bananas actually have a low glycemic index and are a nutritious food that can be an asset to a healthy diet. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) recommends fruit be included in a diabetes meal plan. As with any fruit, bananas can fit as long as the carbohydrates are factored into the plan. Video of the Day Carbohydrates converted to glucose during digestion, and with the help of insulin, glucose provides energy and fuels your cells for action. However, people with diabetes either have sluggish insulin, or don’t make enough insulin, and as a result, have high levels of glucose circulating in the blood. To best manage blood sugar or blood glucose levels, it’s helpful to eat moderate portions of carbohydrate-containing foods and to spread these foods throughout the day. Fruit contains carbohydrate, and a medium banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrate -- the same as a sandwich made of 2 slices of bread. If you know your carbohydrate goals, you can decide which carbohydrate foods to eat at your meals and snacks. For example, if your goal is 45 grams per meal, and you want to eat a banana with your sandwich at lunch, you can either eat a whole sandwich at 30 grams plus one-half banana at 15 grams, or you can choose to eat one-half of the sandwich so you can eat the whole banana. In addition to being a carbohydrate-rich fruit, bananas are often rumored to have a high glycemic index (GI), which is a measure of a food Continue reading >>

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

7 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Type 2 Diabetes

Cooking with less fat by using nonstick pans and cooking sprays and avoiding fat- and sugar-laden coffee drinks will help ensure that you're eating a healthy breakfast. For many people, breakfast is the most neglected meal of the day. But if you have type 2 diabetes, breakfast is a must, and it can have real benefits. “The body really needs the nutrients that breakfast provides to literally ‘break the fast’ that results during sleeping hours,” says Kelly Kennedy, MS, RD, an Everyday Health dietitian. “Having a source of healthy carbohydrates along with protein and fiber is the perfect way to start the morning.” Eating foods at breakfast that have a low glycemic index may help prevent a spike in blood sugar all morning long — and even after lunch. Eating peanut butter or almond butter at breakfast, for example, will keep you feeling full, thanks to the combination of protein and fat, according to the American Diabetes Association. And a good breakfast helps kick-start your morning metabolism and keeps your energy up throughout the day. Pressed for time? You don't have to create an elaborate spread. Here are seven diabetes-friendly breakfast ideas to help you stay healthy and get on with your day. 1. Breakfast Shake For a meal in a minute, blend one cup of fat-free milk or plain nonfat yogurt with one-half cup of fruit, such as strawberries, bananas, or blueberries. Add one teaspoon of wheat germ, a teaspoon of nuts, and ice and blend for a tasty, filling, and healthy breakfast. Time saver: Measure everything out the night before. 2. Muffin Parfait Halve a whole grain or other high-fiber muffin (aim for one with 30 grams of carbohydrates and at least 3 grams of fiber), cover with berries, and top with a dollop of low- or nonfat yogurt for a fast and easy bre Continue reading >>

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Banana Good Or Bad | Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. I have an age old habit of having 1-2 bananas in breakfast. Now that I have been diagnosed with Type-2, is it advisable to continue with this habit? I have banana has lots of carbs and is not good but many people say it is healthy to eat banana even as a diabetic. Our ears must of been burning as I'm interested in knowing if I can continue to eat Bananas, as I enjoy Toasted Wholemeal Bread with a Banana on it, as an alternative to porridge on some mornings. So after seeing the add advising us not to eat bananas, I became concerned and decided to ask why there not recomended, but you beat me to it, so I hope we get a response soon. Just googled that banana has 92% carb- one medium banana has 27g carb so i guess having 2 in the morning will leave little budget for carb for the rest of the day..and god knows what will happen to the blood sugar level with such a high dump of carb So I guess there is more to it than I am getting, i will have to get rid of bananas VinnyJames Type 2 (in remission!) Well-Known Member Some will say that bananas are the devils work but I love them. I wouldn't eat them every day but I have one occasionally and usually just before I hit the gym so I can work off the carbs that way. I think most of us would consider bananas a no-no. The best way to find out for sure is to test before and after eating them to see how you personally are with them. But as you say, 2 nanas i Continue reading >>

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

8 Best Fruits For A Diabetes-friendly Diet

1 / 9 What Fruit Is Good for High Blood Sugar? When you're looking for a diabetes-friendly treat that can help keep your blood sugar within a healthy range, look no farther than the produce drawer of your refrigerator or the fruit basket on your kitchen table. Believe it or not, the notion that fruit is not safe when you need to watch your A1C is a popular diabetes myth that has been debunked again and again. Indeed, according to the American Diabetes Association (ADA), many types of fruit are loaded with good-for-you vitamins and minerals, as well as fiber — a powerful nutrient that can help regulate blood sugar levels and decrease your risk of developing type 2 diabetes, according to the Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health. Fiber — which can also be found in some of the best vegetables for diabetes, as well as whole grains — can further benefit your health because it promotes feelings of fullness, curbing unhealthy cravings and overeating, research shows. Healthy weight maintenance can increase your insulin sensitivity and help in your diabetes management. So, how do you pick the best fruit for diabetes? While some forms of fruit, like juice, can be bad for diabetes, whole fruits like berries, citrus, apricots, and yes, even apples — can be good for your A1C and overall health, fighting inflammation, normalizing your blood pressure, and more. But as with any food in your diabetes diet, you have to be smart about counting carbohydrates and tracking what you eat. Portion size is key. Consume fruit in its whole, natural form, and avoid syrups or any processed fruits with added sugar, which have the tendency to spike your blood sugar. Stick to the produce aisle and the freezer section of your grocery store. If you're using the glycemic index (GI) or glycemic Continue reading >>

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

9 Foods To Avoid When You Have Type 2 Diabetes

1 / 10 Know What to Avoid Diabetes requires daily maintenance, including monitoring your blood sugar, eating a healthy diet, exercising, and of course staying on top of any complications with your heart, eyes, and other organs. Controlling your weight is another key aspect of managing type 2 diabetes. If you’re overweight, losing some weight — even just 10 to 15 pounds — can help improve insulin sensitivity and glycemic control, reduce triglycerides and LDL cholesterol, and lower your blood pressure. A healthy diet for diabetes will help you manage your weight and lead you toward foods that have a positive effect on your glucose levels, while guiding you away from those foods that are likely to cause dangerous spikes in your blood sugar. Learn which nine foods you should steer clear of if you have type 2 diabetes. Continue reading >>

Is Banana Healthy For Pre Diabetes Patients?

Is Banana Healthy For Pre Diabetes Patients?

Yes, banana is healthy for pre-diabetics and is one of the recommended fruits for them. Apart from carbohydrates (sugar), banana contains dietary fiber, protein, vitamin B3, vitamin B6, manganese, vitamin C, vitamin A, iron, folate, and potassium. Banana even has a very a low amount of saturated fats and cholesterol. American Diabetes Association suggests that bananas of various sizes provide a range of carbohydrates, a small banana gives 23 grams of carbohydrates, a medium banana gives 27 grams of carbohydrate, whereas a large banana gives 31 grams of carbohydrate, which is a large quantity of sugar and might be risky for pre-diabetics. Since it also has dietary fiber that holds the sugar in the intestines and prevents it from getting immediately absorbed, it prevents sharp spikes in blood sugar levels, which makes it safe to consume. Being a rich source of dietary fiber, potassium and Vitamin B6 with Vitamin C, bananas are considered to be a good mid-meal fruit for pre-diabetics, but it should be taken in moderate quantities, i.e., 1–2 servings of a medium sized banana per day would be sufficient. By Dr. Varun Gupta (The Editorial Team, 1mg) I am going to repeat the same thing I said for honey because fruits too contain fructose sugar but with added benefits of vitamins, minerals and fibre. It is difficult to say fruits are healthy or otherwise when it is for diabetes or pre diabetes. Due to high fibre content and the fructose from fruit, banana and other fruits do not cause any problem on normal people. But it is difficult to say how a pre-diabetic will react to fruits. In my personal experience, Banana is a no no. But, YMMV (your mileage may vary). I don't even remember when was the last time I ate a Banana - must have been at least 6 months before. For pre-diabet Continue reading >>

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas For Diabetes: Good Or Bad?

Bananas for diabetes. Are you curious to know whether they are a good or bad fruit to include in your diet? Glad you asked. Because while eating bananas are commonly thought of as being a “healthy,” when you have type 2 diabetes or prediabetes, there's a bit more to the story. Let's explore bananas together now. JUMP TO: Bananas as a common fruit | Nutrition facts | The downfalls of fructose | Green vs. ripe bananas | Glycemic index | Potassium sources comparison | Conclusion Bananas: a popular common fruit As we all know, bananas are a popular fruit, well known for their bright yellow peel and unique boomerang shape. People from all across the world consume bananas. And as suggested above, bananas are often considered a health food because they are relatively low in calories and rich in minerals like potassium, plus they’re an easy snack to grab on the go. Still, while they may provide various health benefits for the general population, the question still remains: are they really a healthy choice for people with type 2 diabetes and prediabetes? To find out, let’s start by taking a peek at the nutrition facts. Banana Nutrition Facts For one medium-sized ripe banana: Calories: 105 Total carbohydrates: 26.9g Protein: 1.20g Fat: 0.39g Fiber: 3.1g With only about 1 gram of protein and less than a gram of fat, it’s pretty easy to see that the dominant macronutrient in a banana is… carbohydrates. The carbohydrate content of one medium banana is a whopping 26.9 grams (beware of the oncoming blood sugar spikes)! Foods with a higher carb count can sometimes be “balanced out” if they also contain a high amount of dietary fiber, which reduces the overall net carbs of a food (the available carbs for digestion). But unfortunately, bananas aren’t rich in fiber. Just Continue reading >>

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Can A Diabetic Eat Bananas

Even diabetics should eat at least two servings of fruit per day, and bananas are one healthful way of filling that requirement. One extra-small banana contains 8 percent of the daily value for potassium, a mineral that can help you control your blood pressure. It also provides you with 2 grams of fiber and 12 percent of the daily value for vitamin C. As long as you're careful to eat them with meals, and account for their carbohydrate content in your daily meal plan, they can remain a part of your diet. Carbohydrate Counting The recommended serving size for bananas for diabetics is one extra-small banana, which is a banana that is no more than 6 inches long. A banana of this size contains 19 grams of carbohydrates, which is about a third of the 45 grams to 60 grams of carbohydrates most diabetics can consume in each meal. Glycemic Index Foods that are low on the glycemic index cause less of a rise in blood sugar levels than foods that are higher on the glycemic index. A banana that is a bit green is lower on the glycemic index than a riper banana. If you eat a banana, which is a medium glycemic index food, eat it along with foods that are low on the glycemic index or with foods that contain little or no carbohydrate, as this will help keep your blood sugar from spiking. Foods low on the glycemic index include nuts, non-starchy vegetables and beans. Meat, fish, poultry, cheese and eggs are examples of foods that contain very little carbohydrate. Fruits that have a lower glycemic index include raw apples, cherries and grapefruit, and those that have a higher glycemic index include dried dates and watermelon. Create Your Plate The American Diabetes Association's Create Your Plate method allows you to control your blood sugar without worrying about counting carbohydrates. Y Continue reading >>

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Can I Eat Bananas If I Have Diabetes?

Knowledge is power. But, it can be dangerous too. The wrong kind of knowledge, I mean. The wrong information – when you think something is true, but, in fact, the truth lies elsewhere. Like the case of bananas and diabetes – can diabetics eat bananas? A case of gross misinterpretation and lack of proper knowledge. But worry not, we are here to take care of that. Banana – A Brief A fruit so ‘everyday’ (and delicious) that there wouldn’t be a soul that doesn’t like it. Botanically speaking, banana is a berry. In certain nations, the bananas that are used for cooking are called plantains. Usually elongated and curved, the soft flesh is rich in starch and is covered with a rind that can be yellow, green or brownish-red. Banana is grown in over 135 countries worldwide. The fruit is also cultivated for its fiber, banana wine, and banana beer. There is no distinct difference between bananas and plantains, except that plantains tend to be a little firmer and starchier. Yes, banana is a lip-smacking fruit that improves any dish that you add it to. It has superb benefits and helps prevent numerous diseases. But… …is that the case with diabetes too? Let’s find out. Diabetes And Bananas – The Connection Why bananas? The fruit is considered to be one of the healthiest and most potent. What does it have to do anything with diabetes? Why the link? Let’s have a glance at diabetes – it is a condition where your body cannot efficiently use the insulin that it produces. This ultimately leads to the accumulation of glucose in your blood, resulting in high blood sugar. And now, for the link – the average banana contains about 30 grams of carbohydrates. And most of these carbs come from sugars. Hence, the connection. The larger the banana, the more the sugars. So, Continue reading >>

Fruit And Diabetes

Fruit And Diabetes

Everyone should be eating more fruit and vegetables. You're probably aware of the five a day target, and this is equally important if you’re living with diabetes or if you’re not. You might think you think that the sugar content of fruit means that you can’t eat it. But, the sugar in fruit is natural, and is not this type of sugar we need to cut down on. This is different to the added sugar in drinks, chocolate, cakes and biscuits, as well as in fruit juices and honey. The amount of carbohydrate you eat has the biggest effect on your blood glucose levels and considering a portion of fruit contains about 15–20g carbs, a chocolate muffin has 55g carbs and a small bar of chocolate has 30g carbs it is better to reduce your intake of the chocolate, cakes and other snacks than the fruit itself to help manage your blood glucose levels. It is very unlikely that you need to reduce your fruit intake but you could keep a food diary to check how often and how much fruit you are eating. Some people find that it is easy to overdo the dried fruit, grapes and tropical fruits. If you consider a serving of dried fruit is a tablespoon and packs in 20.8g carbs, 20.8g total sugar and 82 calories you can see how easily this happens. An apple on the other hand, which takes a while to eat, contains only 11.8g carbs, 11.8g sugar and 47 calories. Be mindful of your serving sizes too – bananas in supermarkets now seem to be supersize with a large banana containing 27.8g carbs, 25.1g sugar and 114 calories. But, most people need to cut down on foods with added sugars rather than fruit – a large banana is still better for you than a a standard chocolate bar, which contains 27.9g carbohydrate, 27.8g sugars and a staggering 260 calories. Why do I need to be careful about fruit juices and Continue reading >>

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Should You Eat Bananas If You’re Diabetic?

Diabetics have to be careful about what they eat, and too many carbs or high glycemic index foods are usually a no-no. On the other hand, fresh fruit and vegetables are supposed to have a beneficial effect on the condition. So where does that leave you when it comes to fruit like the humble banana? When you have Type-2 diabetes, your body can’t produce adequate insulin, causing glucose to get pulled out of the blood for storage in cells. As a result, your sugar levels go through dips and spikes. This means your diet has a vital role to play in helping regulate the sugar levels. Very high glycemic foods can exaggerate the spikes and the sudden dips after the sugar is burnt through quickly. What’s In A Banana? Bananas are a rich source of dietary fiber as well as vitamin C, vitamin B6, and potassium, making them a great healthy snack or ingredient in a meal. While the B6 keeps you in a good mood, vitamin C does wonders for your immune system, potassium helps regulate blood pressure, and the fiber keeps you feeling satiated for longer. One study even indicated that native banana starch (24 g per day) could be beneficial for increasing insulin sensitivity and may help lower body weight in obese Type-2 diabetics.1 It is no wonder then that they are also one of the most popular fresh fruits in the United States.2 What diabetics need to keep in mind though, is that bananas also contain carbohydrates and this must be factored in when planning your meals for the day. Diabetics Can Have Bananas Too The American Diabetes Association encourages the consumption of fruit by diabetics and says eating bananas as part of a healthy diet is absolutely okay.3 In fact, one study showed that a banana is actually among the best whole fruit (along with blueberries and grapefruit) you can h Continue reading >>

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

How Bananas Affect Diabetes And Blood Sugar Levels

When you have diabetes, it is important to keep blood sugar levels as stable as possible. Good blood sugar control can help prevent or slow the progression of some of the main medical complications of diabetes (1, 2). For this reason, avoiding or minimizing foods that cause big blood sugar spikes is essential. Despite being a healthy fruit, bananas are pretty high in both carbs and sugar, the main nutrients that raise blood sugar levels. So, should you be eating bananas if you have diabetes? How do they affect your blood sugar? If you have diabetes, being aware of the amount and type of carbs in your diet is important. This is because carbs raise your blood sugar level more than other nutrients, which means they can greatly affect your blood sugar control. When blood sugar rises in non-diabetic people, the body produces insulin. It helps the body move sugar out of the blood and into the cells where it's used or stored. However, this process doesn't work as it should in diabetics. Instead, either the body doesn't produce enough insulin or the cells are resistant to the insulin that is made. If not managed properly, this can result in high-carb foods causing big blood sugar spikes or constantly high blood sugar levels, both of which are bad for your health. 93% of the calories in bananas come from carbs. These carbs are in the form of sugar, starch and fiber (3). A single medium-sized banana contains 14 grams of sugar and 6 grams of starch (3). Bananas are high in carbs, which cause blood sugar levels to rise more than other nutrients. In addition to starch and sugar, a medium-sized banana contains 3 grams of fiber. Everyone, including diabetics, should eat adequate amounts of dietary fiber due to its potential health benefits. However, fiber is especially important for p Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

Five Diabetes Myths, Busted

David Kendall, M.D., is the chief scientific and medical officer of the The American Diabetes Association. The group’s 71st Scientific Sessions begin Friday in San Diego, California, with presentations of the latest research, treatment recommendations and advances toward a cure for diabetes. Each year diabetes accounts for more deaths than breast cancer and AIDS combined. While diabetes (both type 1 and type 2) is ever more manageable because of advances in medication, a better understanding of blood glucose monitoring and new technologies for delivering insulin, uncontrolled or undiagnosed diabetes still remains the leading cause of blindness in adults, kidney failure and amputation. There are many myths about diabetes - myths that can do much harm. Many believe that diabetes is “just a touch of sugar,” or only something we develop in later life. Although diabetes is manageable, the diabetes epidemic continues to grow; every 17 seconds someone is diagnosed with diabetes and at the current rate, one in three people in the U.S. will have diabetes by the year 2050. Knowing the facts (and your own risk) can help all of us fight the misconceptions associated with this awful disease and ultimately stop diabetes. So take a minute to learn the facts about diabetes. The more we know, the better equipped we are to detect, prevent and treat diabetes and its deadly complications. 1) Myth: Diabetes is really no big deal. Fact: As I’ve already noted, diabetes causes more deaths a year than breast cancer and AIDS combined. The risk of heart problems is more than twice as high in people with diabetes and two out of three people with diabetes die from heart disease or stroke. Uncontrolled diabetes also leads to a host of other complications. 2) Myth: Eating too much sugar cause Continue reading >>

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Diabetic Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? | Diabetic Connect

Problem Foods: Can Diabetics Eat Bananas? By Amy Reeder, Registered Dietitian and CDE No Comments Amy Reeder is a Certified Diabetes Educator with a masters degree in nutrition from the University of Utah. She has worked in the diabetes field since 2005 and has been a Certified Diabetes Educator since 2007. Bananas are a healthy way to get nutrients such as vitamin C, potassium, and fiber. However, bananas sometimes tend to get a bad rap, even from doctors. In an internet search, you might frequently run into informational advertisements with bananas as part of the list of the five foods you should never eat. Never eat? That seems a little extreme, especially if you know your nutrition facts about this fruit. Bananas are fat free, sodium free, and cholesterol free. But it is important to understand that bananas are NOT carbohydrate free! And figuring the carbohydrate content of a banana can be tricky because the content varies with size. Use this chart when calculating the carb content of the bananas you eat (measure once and eyeball thereafter): From small to large bananas in that scale, you will get anywhere from two to four grams of fiber per serving, depending on the size. Obviously the larger the banana, the higher the fiber, potassium, and vitamin C content, but that also comes with higher carbohydrate content. Of the 30 grams of carbohydrate in a medium banana, 19 grams are sugar and the other 11 grams are starch, including three grams of fiber. A fully ripe banana has a glycemic index of 51this would be considered a low-glycemic index food, as the cutoff is 55. In addition, the ripeness of a banana changes its glycemic index. An under-ripe banana with visible green sections on the peel would have a glycemic index of approximately 42, while an over-ripe banana w Continue reading >>

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