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Are Apples And Oranges Good For Diabetics

Type 2 Diabetes - Are Apples Really The Best Fruit For Diabetics?

Type 2 Diabetes - Are Apples Really The Best Fruit For Diabetics?

People with type 2 diabetes always want to know if fruit is OK for diabetics to eat. Unfortunately, newly diagnosed type 2 diabetics need to absorb so much information that this simple question becomes impossible for them to answer. On top of that, there is a lot of information on the internet about fruit and diabetes that's downright false. Fortunately, there are quite a few types of fruits that have excellent benefits for people with type 2 diabetes. Among them are citrus fruits, such as oranges and grapefruits, all type of berries... strawberries, blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, cherries, and apples. Even bananas can fall into the good fruit category, although they tend to have a little more sugar than some fruits. Apples: The Perfect Fruit For Diabetics? As long as you monitor your blood sugar levels and don't overdo it with too many servings of fruit, you can enjoy nutrients, such as vitamins, minerals, antioxidants and fiber in lots of fruits. Let's take a look at the apple as it might just be the the perfect fruit for diabetics. Apples are so good for diabetics that research done on people with pre-diabetes found that apples could even keep people from developing diabetes. In the twenty-four hours after "apple consumption", pre-diabetes symptoms were fewer. It seems that an apple a day can really be as good at keeping the doctor away as the old saying says it is. Apples Are Loaded With Fiber: Apples are an excellent source of dietary fiber. Eating one medium-size apple has the same effect as eating a bowl of bran cereal. In fact, just one apple contains 20% of the daily recommendation for fiber. Because an apple has so much fiber, it is good at controlling blood sugars by releasing them more slowly into the blood. This can give you energy over the long-te Continue reading >>

Can Diabetics Eat Apples And Oranges?

Can Diabetics Eat Apples And Oranges?

Diabetics should always follow a suitable diet program in order to sustain the right glucose amount of the body. Because of these unbalanced level of glucose, the foods, containing significant sugar are usually avoided. However, the good fact is that the sugar content in many fruits is often satisfactory in the proper diabetic diet, and two common fruits are apples and oranges. Perhaps, everyone knows the fact apples have the potentials to prevent many diseases. However, most of the diabetics remain concerned on whether this fruit may negatively affectively their physical condition. Those, who are diabetics, must not feel hesitant in eating apples, together some other fruits. Nutrition and its presence in apples The average amount of calorie in one apple is about eighty to ninety; just a few of them are derived from fat. Only one apple has almost dietary fiber of four grams, while vitamin C is about 8 gram. The unfortunate fact is that apples do not have an outstanding source of other minerals or vitamins. But, they contain large amounts of flavanoids and antioxidants. Health benefits that you can get from apples compensate your increasing blood sugar for diabetes. Indeed, apples are the most preferable fruits just as grapes and blueberries because these fruits are extremely advantageous for lessening the danger of mainly type 2 diabetes. It is already said that apples are full of high antioxidants’ amounts, flavanoids and fiber, and all of them save the general fitness of your heart. Though more extensive research is needed, apples are found to promote the proper function of lung and reduce possibility of asthma. Are there carbohydrates in apples? As there is a presence of very low level of carbohydrates, you may easily depend on this fruit, if you are one of the dia Continue reading >>

What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat?

What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat?

Question Originally asked by Community Member jesse perez What Fruits Can A Person With Type Ii Diabetes Eat? Is eating a cantaloupe bad for person with Type II Diabetes? What fruits are best? Answer Specifically, eating cantaloupe isn’t bad for a person with Diabetes. However, you do have to eat fruit in moderation. Fruit has a lot of sugar and counted as a carbohydrate in your diabetic exchange list count. Sugars (and therefore fruit) should not be more than 10 percent of your daily carbohydrate intake. Fructose, the sugar found in fruits, may produce a slower increase in blood sugar than sucrose. Dark-colored fruits are rich in important vitamins and other nutrients. Other fruits, such as apples and grapes also have important beneficial food chemicals. People with diabetes should avoid products listing more than 5 grams of sugar per serving, and some doctors recommend limiting fruit intake. If specific amounts are not listed, patients should avoid products with either sucrose or fructose listed as one of the first four ingredients on the label. The best thing to do is test your bg’s before and after you eat fruit to determine how much you should eat. The key is moderation, and to maintain a well-rounded diabetes diet. You should know Answers to your question are meant to provide general health information but should not replace medical advice you receive from a doctor. No answers should be viewed as a diagnosis or recommended treatment for a condition. Answered By: Cherise Nicole Continue reading >>

Diabetic? The 7 Worst (and 10 Best) Fruits You Can Eat

Diabetic? The 7 Worst (and 10 Best) Fruits You Can Eat

Whether you just got diagnosed with diabetes or have been dealing with it for years, figuring out your diet can get complicated quickly. You can easily find out which kinds of food can help prevent diabetes. But if you already have diabetes, there are more rules and restrictions you need to know. Need an example? We all think fresh fruits and veggies are safe and healthy. But if you have diabetes, some fruits are safer to eat than others. The Cleveland Clinic names berries one of the best foods for diabetics because they have a low glycemic index. The glycemic index measures how much a carbohydrate-containing food raises your blood glucose. But a separate measurement, called the glycemic load, does a better job of telling you a food’s real impact on your blood sugar. A glycemic load of 10 or below is low, and 20 or above is high. Watermelon, for instance, has a high glycemic index, at 80. But a serving of watermelon has few carbohydrates — just 6 grams — so its glycemic load is just 5. So some foods that are high on the glycemic index can have a low glycemic load. Confused yet? We’ve done the hard work for you and found out which fruits nutritionists say are the worst (and the best) for people with diabetes. You might never look at fruit salad the same way again. 1. Dates: worst According to the international table of glycemic index and glycemic load index values, published by the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition, dried dates have a high glycemic load of 42. Livestrong notes with super-sweet fruits, such as dates and raisins, “portion control is crucial.” The publication adds, “In general, people with diabetes should aim for fruit servings that don’t exceed 15 grams of carbohydrates. For that reason, you can usually eat more juicy fresh fruit than Continue reading >>

Eating With Gestational Diabetes

Eating With Gestational Diabetes

By Geetha Desai, MS, RD, CDE and Leona J. Dang-Kilduff, RN, MSN, CDE Use this plan to keep your blood sugar under control and minimize the impact of gestational diabetes on you and your baby. Gestational diabetes (GD) is now more common among pregnant women than before. If you’ve been told by your care provider that you have GD, use this plan to get adequate nutrition and maintain normal weight gain during pregnancy with good control of your blood sugars. Your healthcare provider or perhaps a dietitian will help you establish and meet your meal plan goals for managing GD in pregnancy. Most women with GD will be able to cope with their condition just by following this plan and with exercise. On this plan, you’ll be eating three meals with 2-3 snacks per day, the bedtime snack being important as it prevents your blood sugar levels from being too low overnight. Counting Carbs Carbohydrates in your food become glucose in your body, which is a major energy source for you. Carbohydrates come from starchy foods such as bread, pasta, potatoes, rice and other grains. They are also found in fruits, dairy foods, vegetables, sugar and sweets. When you’re pregnant, eating the right balance of carbohydrates, protein and fat is best for you and your baby. Eating the same amount of carbohydrates at the same time each day will keep your blood sugar within the normal range. One serving of carbohydrate food contains 12–15 grams of carbohydrates. Breakfast and most snacks are targeted at 15-30 grams of carbohydrates. Lunch and dinner should be 30-60 grams of carbohydrates. Managing your Carbohydrates Fruit Milk Starches A typical serving is a small, baseball-size piece. One serving is equal to 12 grams of carbohydrates: One serving is equal to 15 grams of carbohydrates: One serving Continue reading >>

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

What Juices Can Diabetics Drink?

Along with a diabetes-healthy diet, diabetics may consume certain fruit juices, but in moderation. Whole fruits, however, are a better and healthier choice than juices. Juice and Diabetes Juices, such as grapefruit juice, pineapple juice and orange juice, if taken in moderation, are considered appropriate for diabetics. All types of citrus fruit juices are superfood for diabetics as they are nutrient-rich, says American Diabetes Association (ADA). Apart from citrus juices, diabetics may also drink apple juice for it is rich in fibre, lemon juice as it is low on carbs, tomato juice as it is low on sugar content and carrot juice as it is juiced raw. All fruit juices, however, also contain significant amount of sugar, which can cause blood sugar levels to spike. Therefore, moderate consumption of fruit juices is advised. Carbs from juices also adds to your total intake of carbohydrates for the day. Having juice along with the meal can surely reduce the effects of sugar content of the juice. While citrus juices are low on Glycemic Index table, pineapple and orange juice is rated 46 and grapefruit juice is rated 48. Factors Diabetics should Consider Consumption of carbs present in the juices results in increased blood sugar levels, though the impact varies from individual to individual. Here are a few points that diabetics should consider if they wish to consume juices or other beverages. The recommended amount of a fruit or any other drink is 4 oz. per day. Drinking juices separately can lead to quicker spike in blood glucose level. Added sugar in the juices is a major concern for the diabetic’s well-being. Fruit and vegetable juice prepared with the original pulp is a good choice for diabetics. Two of the best juices for diabetics include apple and carrot juice. Recommen Continue reading >>

Fruit List For Diabetics

Fruit List For Diabetics

Often people suffering from diabetes avoid fruits out of fear that the sugar present in fruits could push up their blood sugar level. However, this is a false conception. Most fruits, specifically fruits rich in fibers, are beneficial for reducing the blood sugar level. Sugar present in fruits is usually in the form of fructose. Unlike other forms of sugar, such as sucrose, fructose has low glucemic index. Minimal insulin is needed for the metabolism of fructose. Intake of this fruit sugar is not associated with sudden surge of the blood sugar level. Studies have shown that by reducing cholesterol and triglyceride production, fructose could protect us from diseases such as arteriosclerosis, which leads to heart diseases and stroke. Diabetes bad food includes those that have high glycemic indexes for glucose- which includes those foods that are high in saturated fats and uncontrollably high amounts of sugar in any of its forms- especially sugar from milk. Which brings us back to our main concern- what kinds of fruits can a diabetic eat? Fruits for diabetics are usually those fruits that have high fiber content and have low sugar content. If we take these criteria and apply it, the first fruit that would come to mind would be the high and mighty avocado. But beware; the large avocados have a lot of calories in it- so if you buy the large avocado from florida, make sure you regulate your calorie intake for the rest of the day. Diabetics should NOT eat cooked fruit. Always eat raw fruits in order to reap the benefits. Here's a list of fruits that are beneficial for Diabetics. Any type of wild or organic berry - Seasons: Range All Year Blueberries, Elderberries, Blackberries, Gooseberries, Strawberries etc. There are loads to choose from. You can find their respective season Continue reading >>

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Apples | Reverse Type 2 Diabetes

Ex-Diabetic Sidebar: When I was diabetic, my doctors and the hospital's dietitian told me that I would have to avoid fruits. I found that kind of strange, especially, since some of my hospital meals included applesauce, tangerine slices and orange juice! Avoiding fruits was difficult for me because I had a "sweet tooth" -- a strong craving for sweets. Being diabetic, my body craved sugar and I loved sweets -- not just fruits -- I loved apple pie, brownies, chocolate chip cookies, and ice cream. During my research, I discovered how to stop the cravings (see below). I also learned that eating some whole fruit can be beneficial, despite the sugar content in most fruits. Why? Because it's better to eat an apple than some cookies or ice cream to satisfy your craving for something sweet! :-) In addition, studies have shown that the nutrients within most fruits (e.g. antioxidants, Vitamin C, fiber, water) can help prevent and reverse the damage to blood vessels and body tissues caused by Type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and other similar diseases. The key is to make sure that you follow an effective reverse diabetes nutritional program such as the one defined in the "Death to Diabetes" 10-Step Reverse Diabetes Wellness Program. Most whole fruits are on the moderate to low end of the Glycemic Index (GI), making them a pretty good choice for most people with diabetes. Many fruits are also packed with vitamins A and C, as well as water,fiber and antioxidants (flavonoids) such as catechin, quercetin, and anthocyanidin. Top 10 Fruits | Reverse Diabetes The following is a list of the top 10 fruits that most diabetics can eat because, for most diabetics, these fruits don't cause large or sustained blood glucose spikes. As a result, eating these fruits can help to satisfy your sweet to Continue reading >>

8 Fruits You Should Be Eating And 8 You Shouldn't

8 Fruits You Should Be Eating And 8 You Shouldn't

Who doesn't love fruit? It's delicious, sweet, and good for you. That's what I call a win/win. But not all fruits are created equally. While they all have health benefits, some are healthier than others. You should be looking for fruit high in fiber and vitamins, and low in calories and sugar. If you're thinking about which fruits to use as staples in your diet and which to indulge in only occasionally, it's important to know the facts so you can make the best and healthiest choices for your body. Do eat: Pineapple If you're looking for a tropical fruit packed with excellent health benefits, look no further than the pineapple, rich in vitamin C and manganese. The best reason to eat pineapple, however, is an enzyme called bromelain, which you can only get by eating this tasty fruit. Bromelain helps you absorb antibiotics, stops diarrhea, and may even fight diabetes, heart disease and cancer, according to a study by Biotechnology Research International. It also shortens the healing time after surgery and is used for treating inflammation and sports injuries. If you're looking for ways to incorporate more pineapple into your diet, I suggest putting it on your pizza, cutting up a pineapple and eating it as a snack, or adding it to your smoothies. You can also put in on your oatmeal, add it to beef tacos, or chop it up into some salsa. I love the way Tonia of The Gunny Sack also used a pineapple as the serving dish in her pineapple salsa recipe! Do eat: Blueberries All berries have incredible health benefits, but blueberries take it to another level. One cup of blueberries contains 4 grams of fiber and only 15 grams of carbohydrates. In that cup, you'll also get 24 percent of your daily recommended vitamin C and 36 percent of the recommended dose of vitamin K. Due to their h Continue reading >>

To Cut Risk Of Diabetes, Eat More Fruit But Skip The Juice

To Cut Risk Of Diabetes, Eat More Fruit But Skip The Juice

Eating blueberries, grapes and apples seems to lower your risk of diabetes but drinking fruit juice increases it, according to a new study led by researchers at the Harvard School of Public Health. The study, published in the British Medical Journal, was the first to look at the effects of individual whole fruits on the risk of type 2 diabetes, according to the researchers. "While fruits are recommended as a measure for diabetes prevention, previous studies have found mixed results for total fruit consumption," said the study's senior author, Qi Sun, an assistant professor in the school's Department of Nutrition and at Brigham and Women's Hospital in Boston. "Our findings provide novel evidence suggesting that certain fruits may be especially beneficial for lowering diabetes risk." The study is one more example of how a diet rich in fruit can improve your health. Earlier this month, researchers reported that fruits could protect against a type of deadly aneurysm that develops in the abdomen. About 25.8 million people living in the United States had a form of diabetes as of 2011, most of them type 2 diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. An additional 79 million Americans had pre-diabetes, but many did not know they were at risk. In type 2 diabetes, the body either does not produce enough insulin to break down sugar and starch or the insulin that is present is ignored by cells. Over time, high glucose levels can damage the eyes, kidneys, nerves and heart. In the most recent study, researchers from the United States, Britain and Singapore examined data collected from about 187,000 participants in three long-running studies in the United States to determine which fruits were associated with a risk of diabetes. Nurses and other health professionals were q Continue reading >>

What Fruits Are Best

What Fruits Are Best

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community I have just joined the Forum and wonder if anyone had a list of fruits that are good or bad for type 2 diabetes. I usually have 4 or 5 pieces a day of fruit which is usually Pears - Bananas & Oranges. I seem to think I have read somewhere Bananas aren't especially good for diabetics. Berries are good - strawberries. raspberries, blueberries - basically anything with berry in its name. I do eat pears and oranges but never bananas. The riper the fruit, the more carbs in it. In my opinion, no food is 'good' or 'bad'. You need to test to find out what, and how much, of a particular food raises your blood sugar to a level you find unacceptable. If you are able to control your portion size, all the better. Some people and that includes me, simply can't eat any amount of carbs, including those in fruit, because it sets off a craving that is very difficult to resisit. Without carbs, I don't need to fight the urge to eat. Yes, it's how well, or not well you manage carbs individually. I can tolerate bananas well, and hardly spike, but 'any' other fruit and my sugar goes high, so all you can do is keep testing and find out which fruits if any you can tolerate. Bananas are very much trial and error. Some notice no effect on bloodsugars whatsoever, while others rocket into double figures before you can say "tired and thirsty". How ripe they are can make a difference. Green bananas tend to digest slowly and so any effect on bloodsugar is slower. Very ripe bananas can have a much quicker impact on bloodsugar, to the extent that some will happily use them to treat hypos. As the others have said it is very individual, my father could not tolerate fruit at all and oran Continue reading >>

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

Blueberries, Grapes, Prunes, And Apples May Be Linked To A Lower Risk Of Type 2 Diabetes

There’s compelling evidence supporting the notion that high-fructose diets are responsible for most chronic disease; insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and obesity in particular Many fruits are very high in fructose, up to 50X the sugar that most of the fruits our ancestors were exposed to due to consistent hybridization over the past century for sweetness Therefore most fruits are best limited or avoided if you have insulin/leptin resistance as determined by struggling with your weight, or, diabetes, hypertension, heart disease or cancer According to a new study, certain kinds of whole fruits—particularly blueberries, grapes, prunes and apples—may reduce your risk of type 2 diabetes Consumption of fruit juices, on the other hand, was found to have greater risk. Those who drank one or more servings of fruit juice each day had a 21 percent higher risk for type 2 diabetes compared to the others I believe most will benefit from restricting their fructose to 25 grams a day; and as little as 15 grams a day if you’re diabetic or have chronic health issues. This includes fructose from whole fruits By Dr. Mercola You're probably well-familiarized with my controversial stance on fructose. Compelling evidence shows that fructose is, by far, more harmful to your health than other sugars—especially when it's removed from whole fruits and highly processed and genetically modified, such as high fructose corn syrup (HFCS) found in most processed foods. I've also, as a general rule, warned you of eating too much fruit, as many fruits can be quite high in fructose. This has caused some confusion and consternation among many readers, as fruit has long been promoted as an important part of a healthy diet. That said, there are considerations to take into account when it comes to Continue reading >>

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

Diabetes Diet: Should I Avoid Sweet Fruits?

I've heard that you shouldn't eat sweet fruits such as strawberries or blueberries if you have diabetes. Is this true? Answers from M. Regina Castro, M.D. It's a common myth that if you have diabetes you shouldn't eat certain foods because they're "too sweet." Some fruits do contain more sugar than others, but that doesn't mean you shouldn't eat them if you have diabetes. The total amount of carbohydrates in a food affects blood sugar levels more than does the source of carbohydrates or whether the source is a starch or sugar. One serving of fruit should contain 15 grams of carbohydrates. The size of the serving depends on the carbohydrate content of the fruit. The advantage of eating a low-carbohydrate fruit is that you can consume a larger portion. But whether you eat a low-carb or high-carb fruit, as long as the serving size contains 15 grams of carbohydrates, the effect on your blood sugar is the same. The following fruit servings contain about 15 grams of carbohydrates: 1/2 medium apple or banana 1 cup blackberries 3/4 cup blueberries 1 cup raspberries 1 1/4 cup whole strawberries 1 cup cubed cantaloupe or honeydew melon Continue reading >>

Nine (9) Fruits You Should Treat With Extreme Caution

Nine (9) Fruits You Should Treat With Extreme Caution

Eating a diet that is low in sugar and low in fat is essential to beating your diabetes. Most fruit fit the bill. However there are certain fruits you must treat with caution or avoid altogether. Here are nine of them. The fundamental problem that causes type 2 diabetes appears to be fat blocking the receptors in muscle cells, which leaves sugar and insulin swirling around aimlessly in your bloodstream. In my experience, you can beat diabetes by eating foods that are (1) low in sugar, (2) low in fat, (3) low in salt, (4) high in fibre and that (5) are digested slowly. The easiest way to do this is by concentrating on natural, unprocessed foods that are mostly plants and by excluding all diary products (milk, cheese, butter etc) and eggs from the diet. You also need to drink plenty of water, to aid in the absorption of all the fibre you will be eating with this plant-focused diet. Personally I drink at least two litres of water a day in addition to the water, juices, tea and soy milk in my food and coffee. You should also take a good multi-vitamin supplement in order to cover any possible dietary deficiencies you might encounter by avoiding dairy products and eggs. Most fruits contain some natural sugars but usually not to excess. Most are extremely low in fat and salt. They are also high in fibre and are digested slowly. Fruit therefore should be a part of a diabetes beating diet, especially as most fruits are full of micro-nutrients (vitamins and minerals). However there are some exceptions to this general rule. Here are nine of them—fruits you should treat with extreme caution or avoid altogether. Dates Dates provide a wide range of essential nutrients, 2.45g of protein in 100g, along with 8g of dietary fibre. Eat dates regularly and you’ll seldom suffer from cons Continue reading >>

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Fruits For Diabetes: All You Need To Know

Eating fruit is a delicious way to satisfy hunger and meet daily nutritional needs. However, most fruits contain sugar, which raises questions about whether they are healthy for people who have diabetes. Is fruit unhealthy for people with diabetes? This article will look at what you need to know about fruit and diabetes. Contents of this article: What is fruit? Most people can probably name several fruits such as oranges and apples, but not know why they are fruits. Fruits contain seeds and come from plants or trees. People eat fruits that are stored in many ways - fresh, frozen, canned, dried, and processed. But aren't tomatoes and cucumbers also fruits because they have seeds? There are many foods that are classed as fruits that may surprise some people. Tomatoes, cucumbers, avocados, peas, corn, and nuts are all fruits. It's fine to think of tomatoes and cucumbers as vegetables rather than fruits, however. What's important is how much energy (calories) and nutrients each food has. The bottom line: it's not important to know the difference between fruits and vegetables but to know that both are good for health. Does eating fruit play a role in managing diabetes? Eating enough fiber plays an important role in managing diabetes. A diet high in soluble fiber can slow the absorption of sugar and control blood sugar levels. Many fruits are high in fiber, especially if the skin or pulp is eaten. Many fruits are filling because they contain fiber and a lot of water. Diets containing enough fruits and vegetables can reduce the risk of obesity, heart attack, and stroke. Obesity has been linked to type 2 diabetes. Fruits are high in fiber and nutrients, so they are a good choice in meal planning. Fruits that have been processed such as applesauce and fruit juices have had their Continue reading >>

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