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Apple Watch Glucose Monitor Release Date

Apple Watch Can Detect Early Signs Of Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Study Finds

Apple Watch Can Detect Early Signs Of Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Study Finds

Apple Watch can detect early signs of diabetes with 85% accuracy, study finds Amid rumors that Apple is working on a non-invasive glucose monitoring system for Apple Watch, researchers are using cutting edge software science to prove the heart rate sensors in current-generation wearables can successfully detect early signs of diabetes. As part of an ongoing study involving Apple Watch and Android Wear users, researchers at app developer Cardiogram and the University of California, San Francisco, trained a deep neural network called DeepHeart to distinguish people with and without diabetes at an accuracy of 85 percent. The collaborative study pulled from 14,011 Cardiogram users enrolled with the UCSF Health eHeart Study to obtain 33,628 person-weeks of health sensor data. This information was used to train DeepHeart, which was presented with samples from people with and without diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation and high cholesterol, according to Cardiogram co-founder Johnson Hsieh. "Typical deep learning algorithms are data-hungry, requiring millions of labeled examples, but in medicine, each label represents a human life at risk for example, a person who recently suffered a heart attack or experienced an abnormal heart rhythm," Hsieh said in a prepared statement. "To solve this challenge, researchers applied two semi-supervised deep learning techniques ('unsupervised sequence pretraining' and 'weakly-supervised heuristic pretraining') which made use of both labeled and unlabeled heart rate data to improve accuracy." Hsieh notes a correlation between diabetes and a body's autonomic nervous system allows DeepHeart to detect the disease through heart rate readings. Specifically, as people develop early stage diabetes, their pattern of heart rate var Continue reading >>

Future Apple Watch Rumored To Include Glucose Monitoring And Smart Bands

Future Apple Watch Rumored To Include Glucose Monitoring And Smart Bands

Apple is planning major new health features for future versions of the Apple Watch, according to a new report from BGR citing sources with knowledge of Apple's plans. The company is said to be working on implementing a new glucose monitoring feature and interchangeable smart bands, which could add new health functionality to the Apple Watch. Both features have been previously rumored in the past, but BGR suggests the functionality could be coming soon. It has been rumored that Apple is interested in glucose monitoring, and it appears that the time may now be right. Previous rumors have stated that Apple might only be able to achieve this through a separate device that might complement the watch, however BGR has learned that this might not be accurate. In April, a CNBC report suggested Apple had a team of biomedical engineers working to develop sensors for non-invasively monitoring blood glucose, with work on the sensors far enough along that the company had started conducting feasibility trials. BGR claims Apple has hired more than 200 PhDs in the health field in the last year with the aim of "innovating in the health space" through a glucose monitoring feature that will be released in an "upcoming Apple Watch." The site also says Apple is working on interchangeable "smart watch bands" that would add "various functionality" to the Apple Watch, allowing Apple to introduce new features without driving the base cost of the wearable device higher. Glucose monitoring could perhaps be introduced through one of these smart bands, rather than added to the watch itself. A smart watch band with such functionality makes some sense, as Apple CEO Tim Cook has said previously that Apple does not want to put the Apple Watch through the FDA approval process, something that would likely Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Series 4 Release Date, Specs & Price Rumours

Apple Watch Series 4 Release Date, Specs & Price Rumours

Apple Watch Series 4 release date, specs & price rumours Apple Watch Series 4 release date, specs & price rumours When will the Apple Watch Series 4 be released, and what will it look like, cost, and be able to do? We examine the rumours about Apple's next smartwatch The Apple Watch Series 3 was unveiled on 12 Sept 2017, and hit the shops 10 days later. But we're already looking ahead to Apple's next trick: when will the Series 4 be released, and what new features and tech specs should we expect? In this article we sift through the evidence and predict what new features and technologies the Series 4 will offer (such as a larger screen and Face ID ), as well as discussing what we would like to see next. For information on the current range, take a look at our Apple Watch buying guide , as well as our roundup of the best Apple Watch deals . Three generations in, we're starting to get a feel for Apple's smartwatch launch schedule, which was irregular early on but appears to be settling down into an annual event. These are onsale launch dates; the first model in particular was announced a long time ahead of this. Our money is on an update in autumn 2018, and most likely in September alongside new iPhones . This is backed up by a report from analyst Ming-Chi Kuo, who points to an autumn 2018 update. There has been a separate rumour that Apple could release a between-full-updates 'S' edition of the Apple Watch: presumably a Series 3S, which would add extra storage options the Series 3 and come out before the Series 4. But until we see concrete evidence, we're not convinced by this. Apple has kept the same design for three generations in a row (aside from some minor cosmetic tweaks, such as a new material and colour options, and a red spot on the cellular model). Having added Continue reading >>

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

Even before the Apple Watch was introduced, there were rumors surrounding the companys interest in developing a wearable device capable of monitoring a users glucose levels in a non-invasive manner. Without question, such an advancement in glucose monitoring would represent an immense medical breakthrough as it would be a godsend for diabetics who typically have to measure their glucose levels multiple times a day. While various startups and established biotech companies have spent decades trying to crack non-invasive glucose monitoring with no real success to speak of, rumblings of Apples continued interest in the field have persisted for years now. Indeed, a new report from The New York Times relays that Apples research into non-invasive glucose monitoring remains ongoing. Interestingly enough, we learn that the impetus from Apples interest in the field stems from Steve Jobs own battle with diabetes. In the last months of Steve Jobss life, the Apple co-founder fought cancer while managing diabetes. Because he hated pricking his finger to draw blood, Mr. Jobs authorized an Apple research team to develop a noninvasive glucose reader with technology that could potentially be incorporated into a wristwatch, according to people familiar with the events The original Apple Watch, which saw development begin after Jobs passing, has since become an incredibly popular health and fitness tracker. Indeed, just recently a rumor emerged claiming that future Apple Watch models may incorporate an EKG heart monitor as a means to detect significant heart ailments ahead of time. As for Apples interest in non-invasive glucose monitoring, that solution, if one is ever discovered, remains years away according to the Times. Indeed, John L. Smith, one of the worlds foremost experts on non-i Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Series 4: Release Date Rumors, Spec Speculation, And More!

Apple Watch Series 4: Release Date Rumors, Spec Speculation, And More!

Apple Watch Series 3 debuted in September of 2017 but, as is my wont, I'm already thinking about the next version. What will it look like? What new features will it have that pique my fancy? April 14, 2018: Third-party Apple Watch face rumors once again make the rounds Ever since Apple Watch debuted with Mickey Mouse on its face, pretty much everyone has dreamt of more open and expansive support. While Apple has added more faces over the years, the company still hasn't added watch faces to the App Store. That may not change for a while, but there also may be infrastructure already in place to allow it one day. Code found on watchOS 4.3.1 suggests this could change in the future. A component of the NanoTimeKit framework, responsible for the watch faces, implements a developer tools server that's probably designed to communicate with Xcode running on a Mac. One of its methods has a very interesting log message: "This is where the 3rd party face config bundle generation would happen" Again, don't go getting any hopes up. Beyond it being unclear if Apple will ever surface any third-party watch face functionality, it's unclear how it would be surfaced. We could get nothing. We could get a strict partner program. We could get a highly curated store. Or we could get an open API. We'll have to wait and see. But mostly wait. March 28, 2018: Apple Watch Series 4 could feature a bigger display, redesigned body Ming-Chi Kuo of KGI is at it again, this time with a report concerning the next iteration of the Apple Watch. According to Kuo's report, coming via 9to5Mac the Apple Watch Series 4 will launch later this year with a new design, as well as a 15% larger display. With a launch in the third quarter of 2018, Ming-Chi Kuo says the new watches will have a 15% larger display. All W Continue reading >>

Soon, Diabetics Will Be Able To Check Their Glucose Levels On Their Fitbit Smartwatch

Soon, Diabetics Will Be Able To Check Their Glucose Levels On Their Fitbit Smartwatch

The Dexcom G5 Mobile sensor gives people who suffer from diabetes a way to consistently monitor their glucose levels without pricking their fingers. Starting next year, users will be able to access that valuable data via the Fitbit Ionic smartwatch. Next month, Fitbit will release their new smartwatch, the Ionic. Ahead of the device’s launch, the fitness tracker specialists have announced a partnership with glucose monitor firm Dexcom that will allow people with diabetes to use the device to track their glucose levels. The Fitbit Ionic will be capable of displaying data collected by the Dexcom G5 Mobile sensor, which is implanted under the skin. Currently, the sensor delivers updates on the user’s glucose levels every five minutes via a companion app, but starting in 2018, those updates will be accessible through the Ionic. The Dexcom G5 system is already compatible with Apple Watch, but communication must go through an iPhone rather than happening directly between the sensor and the smartwatch itself. That requirement is expected to change when Apple releases their watchOS4 update later this year. Making the Dexcom sensor compatible with major smartwatch brands is a great way to help the more than 400 million people with diabetes keep an eye on their condition. However, they’ll need to make a significant financial investment in order to take advantage of this technology — Fitbit’s Ionic is priced at $300 and the Dexcom sensor itself costs $900. Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal to Bring Glucose Monitoring Data to its Ionic Smartwatch Friday September 8, 2017 3:48 AM PDT by Tim Hardwick Fitbit has announced a new partnership with glucose monitoring device company Dexcom that is set to bring diabetes monitoring capabilities to the fitness tracker company's new Ionic smartwatch. The deal initially means Ionic users will be able to connect a Dexcom device to the Fitbit app and seamlessly transfer up-to-date glucose level data to the smartwatch, making the information more easily accessible on their wrist. "The collaboration between Dexcom and Fitbit is an important step in providing useful information to people with diabetes that is both convenient and discreet," said Kevin Sayer, President and CEO, Dexcom. "We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that experience available to users of both Android and iOS devices, will have a positive impact on the way people manage their diabetes." There's nothing in the partnership to suggest the Ionic smartwatch will be able to give continuous glucose monitoring readouts on its own when it's released next month current continuous glucose monitoring systems require a small sensor that's worn under the skin to monitor glucose levels but Fitbit shares jumped 13 percent on the news, a high for the company since January, when it laid off some of its employees and announced its smartwatch plans. Dexcom also has a deal with Apple to bring its features to the Apple Watch this year, while owners of Dexcom monitors can already view their glucose data on an Apple Watch advanced devices by Dexcom include a transmitter, which can display glucose information directly to an iPhone app. Apple is thought to be working on a non-invasive real-time glucose monitor for a future v Continue reading >>

Apple's Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Solution Still Several Years Off

Apple's Non-invasive Glucose Monitoring Solution Still Several Years Off

Ivan Jovin 474 Views 0 Comments Health tracker The Apple Watch non-invasive glucose monitoring solution is still years off according to a new article in the New York Times . Diabetes is a lifelong condition that causes a persons blood sugar level to become too high. Itis one of thefastest growing health threats of our times and an urgent public health issue. According to US government statistics, some 9.3% of Americans or 29.1 million people are diagnosed with the condition. Worldwide, an estimated 371 million people have the disease. Essential reading: Smart Glucometres, high-tech options for monitoring your blood sugar Non-invasive glucose monitoring is considered to be the holy grail of diabetes treatment. Many have spentyears trying to crack the problem with no real-world success. For the most part diabetes patients still have no accurate alternatives totracking glucose bypiercing the skin. Its been rumoured for some time that Apple is working on sensors that non-invasively and continuously monitor blood sugar levels. But New York Times sources saythe feature wont be shipping anytime soon. According to two people close to the project, the research is on-going but the technology is still several years away. Interestingly, we learned that Apples quest to develop the sensors was motivated by Steve Jobss own troubles, who in the final years of his life was coping withdiabetes as well as cancer. In the last months of Steve Jobss life, the Apple co-founder fought cancer while managing diabetes,writes the New York Times. Because he hated pricking his finger to draw blood, Mr. Jobs authorized an Apple research team to develop a noninvasive glucose reader with technology that could potentially be incorporated into a wristwatch, according to people familiar with the event., Continue reading >>

An Apple Watch That Tracks Glucose Could Be Years Away, Says Report

An Apple Watch That Tracks Glucose Could Be Years Away, Says Report

An Apple Watch that tracks glucose could be years away, says report Serious health tracking feature still very much a work in progress It seems like the idea that the Apple Watch could one day non-invasively take glucose readings is a long way off from becoming a staple smartwatch feature. That's according to a report in the New York Times , which explores how the Watch could transform into a fully fledged health monitoring wearable. According to two people with knowledge of the project, Apple is continuing its research into noninvasive glucose readers, but industry experts said the technology to make it a possibility is still considered to be years away. Read this: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation The report also claims that research on the subject has been a few years in the works and was one of the features considered for the first generation Apple Watch. It seems that when the company saw what impact health tracking features like this would have on the watch size and battery life, it decided to alter its approach to building the wearable. That research apparently was authorised by Steve Jobs who was managing diabetes during the same time he was fighting pancreatic cancer according to people familiar with the events. Jobs was said to hate having to prick his finger to draw blood and gave the go ahead to start exploring how to put an end to the invasive method of generating a reading. We previously reported that Apple had hired a small team of biomedical engineers to build a non-invasive sensor for monitoring glucose levels, according to CNBC , and had even started clinical trials in the Bay Area, while working with consultants to navigate tricky health regulations. The report said that the project had been ongoing for at least five years, and as of a year ago had Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch vs diabetes: The glucose monitoring story so far How Apple's smartwatch could evolve into a smarter health device For as long as the Apple Watch has been rumoured, there have been murmurs that the company will one day build a wearable that is capable of offering continuous glucose monitoring. Suffice it to say, that would be a big deal for a lot of people not just diabetics. The Apple Watch isn't quite there yet in terms of offering this serious health tracking feature, but it seems as if it's working to try and make it happen. Essential reading: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation As Apple continues to make a bigger push into health, we explore how the smartwatch is already working with glucose monitoring devices, the challenges Tim Cook and company face to offer the monitoring from its its own wearable and how it could actually take shape. If you're looking to check your glucose right now, there is a way to do this with the Apple Watch. All you need is a device from Dexcom, the biggest name in continuous glucose monitoring these days. Specifically, you'll need the Dexcom G5 CGM mobile system, which will pair with the Dexcom G5 Mobile app. You'll then be able to see your glucose levels right there on your Watch. Eventually, Dexcom plans to upgrade its app for watchOS 4 support, which will take advantage of core Bluetooth to pair your Dexcom device directly with your Apple Watch. That way you won't need your iPhone to act as an intermediary. Read this: How wearables are helping the lives of diabetics It's been a couple months since watchOS 4 dropped, so it's easy to wonder whether Fitbit's deal with Dexcom has killed the Apple Watch update, but it's likely the watchOS 4 support has been held up by the FDA (we'll get back around to this in a bit). There's als Continue reading >>

Apple Watch 3 | Specs, News, Release Date, And More

Apple Watch 3 | Specs, News, Release Date, And More

Apple Watch Series 3: News, new features, and release China blocks LTE access to Apple Watch Series 3, reportedly over security issues Update: our Watch Series 3 review is out and says the Apple Watch 3 comes oh so close to replacing your phone. Wearables may face a murky future , but that didnt stop Apple from announcing the Apple Watch Series 3 alongside the iPhone X , Apple TV 4K, and new AirPods at the Steve Jobs Theater in Cupertino, California in mid-September. Apples most refined interpretation of a wearable yet boasts LTE connectivity, an improved display and battery, and a waterproof design that comes in an endless array of styles, colors, and materials. Apple says its the most popular smartwatch in the world, topping Rolex, Fossil, Omega, and Cartier. And its riding on a wave of popularity Apple says the Apple Watch has a 97-percent customer satisfaction rating. Heres everything you need to know about the Apple Watch Series 3. As of Friday, September 22, the Apple Watch Series 3 both with and without LTE is available in 38mm and 42mm sizes. You can get one yourself via the Apple Store website or the Apple Store app for iOS devices, as well as from carriers including Verizon, AT&T, Sprint, and T-Mobile, and others in 26 countries. The Apple Watch Series 3 starts at $330 without LTE and at $400 with LTE. You might want to hold off a bit before picking up an LTE-enabled Apple Watch, though. On Wednesday, September 20, Apple released a statement about connectivity issues its attempting to resolve ahead of the Apple Watch Series 3s ship date. We have discovered that when Apple Watch Series 3 joins unauthenticated Wi-Fi networks without connectivity, it may at times prevent the watch from using cellular, an Apple spokesperson told The Verge. We are investigating a Continue reading >>

Apple Watch 3 Rumors: Release Date, New Features, Price And More

Apple Watch 3 Rumors: Release Date, New Features, Price And More

Update Sept. 20: The Apple Watch Series 3 is now for sale, and you can check out our hands-on impressions and review roundup . Also see all the top Apple Watch 3 new features . Although the smartwatch is still a niche category, it's hard to deny that the Apple Watch rules. In fact, Apple has surpassed Fitibt as the No. 1 maker of wearable devices overall. Two years after the first Apple smartwatch appeared, we've seen one significant update to the device , along with a bump to the original model . But unlike the heavily hyped iPhone 8 , the next Apple Watch has mostly flown under the radar, though recent rumors suggest we could be seeing an update to the smartwach lineup sooner rather than later. If we do, heres what you can expect from the Apple Watch Series 3. Apple Watch 3 Rumors at Glance (Updated August 4) Release could be in fall 2017 to coincide with iPhone 8. 4G for staying connected away from your phone. Camera to enable FaceTime calls on the go. Apple has bought sleep-tracking company Beddit, which signals sleep tracking is being added to the watch. Apple is reportedly looking to use microLED technology in all wearables by 2018. Modular wristband for adding features, such as glucose readings for diabetics. Apple's putting an emphasis on other health-tracking features including respiration rates. watchOS 4 will debut in the fall with new watch faces and fitness features. Compared with the iPhone, which has received regular yearly updates since its release in 2007, Apple Watch updates come out with less regularity. The Series 2 models arrived in fall 2016, a year and a half after the original model's spring 2015 debut. If that pattern were to continue, it would peg spring 2018 as the most likely release date for a Series 3 model. MORE: Apple Watch Guide: Tips, Continue reading >>

Will The Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Revolution Ever Arrive?

Will The Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Revolution Ever Arrive?

A needle-free alternative to the finger-prick test would be a godsend for many sufferers of diabetes, but the industry has yet to clear the technological hurdles. In the early 2000s, a long-standing problem affecting diabetes sufferers around the world seemed on the brink of being solved. After years of research and development, a needle-free device to measure a person’s blood glucose levels was coming to market—a game-changer for patients fed up with the messy and painful procedure of the blood-drawing finger-prick test. Worn like a wristwatch, Cygnus Incorporated’s GlucoWatch G2 Biographer used weak electric currents to draw glucose from interstitial fluid just under the surface of the skin into an “autosensor.” There, the sugar was oxidized by an enzyme, resulting in the release of hydrogen peroxide that was detected by a metal biosensor. The signal produced by this biosensor could be used, the company claimed, to infer how much glucose was in the fluid, and therefore, after a bit more analysis, in the blood. Approved by the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA) in 2002, the device was intended to provide regular, painless measurements and, at least initially, complement, rather than entirely replace, the finger-prick test used by both type 1 and type 2 diabetics. Nevertheless, the excitement was tangible. The Daily Mail labeled the device “a wristwatch to ease diabetes.” The acting principal deputy commissioner of the FDA called the technology “one of the first steps in developing new products that may one day completely eliminate the need for daily finger-prick tests.” Within months of its release, however, the GlucoWatch gained a bad reputation. Patients reported painful rashes where electrical currents irritated the skin, and the device’s thre Continue reading >>

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Dexcom and Fitbit team up to develop smartwatch that measures blood sugar 08 September 2017 A technological breakthrough means smart watches could pave the way for diagnosing diabetes people in the future. A study, based on data from 14,000 users of DeepHeart, a popular Apple Watch app, has shown the wearable technology was able to identify people with diabetes with 85% accuracy. Examples of wearable technology include Apple Watch, Android Wear and Fitbit. The technology comprises a built-in sensor which works alongside a "neural network". The DeepHeart app uses an artificial intelligence algorithm that takes into account the wearer's heart rate and step count. The heart and pancreas are linked via the body's nervous system , so when a person starts to develop diabetes their heart pattern changes. The pioneering wearable kit also showed it could accurately detect high cholesterol, high blood pressure and sleep apnea to 74%, 81% and 83% accuracy respectively. The research was a joint project between a health app development company health app Cardiogram and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). Cardiogram co-founder Johnson Hsieh said: "Researchers at Cardiogram and UCSF validated the accuracy of DeepHeart, a deep neural network, in distinguishing between people with and without diabetes, achieving 85 per cent accuracy on a large data set which included 200 million heart rate and step count measurements." Early detection of type 2 diabetes could help people seek treatment much earlier, which in the long term means they could avoid further related health complications . Brandon Ballinger, another Cardiogram co-founder, said: "While there ha Continue reading >>

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