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Apple Glucose Monitor

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important To You

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important To You

New Apple Ad Features Dexcom: Here Is Why That Is Important to You People living with type 1 diabetes (T1D) are understandably excited to hear the words,my daughter was recently diagnosed with type 1 diabetesin an Apple ad, but that is just the beginning of why this Apple Watch advertisement should get your heart pumping. The percentage of people with T1D using continuous glucose monitoring technology is still relatively low. The barriers to adoption are multi-variable. Cost, lack of insurance coverage, misunderstanding of what the technology brings to your life and plain just not knowing that it exists are but a few. The truth, however, is that even if you never find your way to a CGM, this quick video, in my opinion, should still make you happy. Heres why. We finally have a device manufacturer in the diabetes world who moved beyond the diabetes world. When Dexcom searched for others whose collaboration might improve their product,they didnt just form a relationship with a little start-up.They formed a relationship with Apple. The mention of Apple Watch integration with Dexcom in this ad, in my opinion, is not random. The mention didnt happen just because someone wrote a letter. It is there on purpose.This is Apple telling us what is important to them and a signal of where they are focusing their efforts when it comes to the health space. The company that put a smartphone into most every hand on the planet and the company that is hugely responsible for the technology that keeps my daughter healthy, they are dating. I think we are all going to like what their future children grow up to be. Im even more excited when I think about the relationship that Dexcom has with Omnipod and the ways that the Apple connection could improve all aspects of the tech that helps to keep Continue reading >>

Apple Monitoring Blood Glucose | Hacker News

Apple Monitoring Blood Glucose | Hacker News

As a type 1 diabetic I'm super excited to see apple working in this space, even if they're focusing it on type 2 to start (a logical move, considering there is something like 30x more type 2 diabetics in the US). I think making it easier to track glucose levels in real time is the number one thing that can be done to improve quality of life for both types of diabetics. The "CGM" (continuous glucose monitor) has really come into it's own over the last 10 or so years, and I would encourage all diabetics (but especially type 1) to use one. Currently the only 2 real options on the market are: - - Connects directly to your phone using bluetooth and will send glucose warnings etc as notifications. - - Designed to work with Medtronic (who is a market leader) insulin pumps. Both these options are expensive (even with insurance for many), invasive, and not really tailored towards "casual" glucose monitoring. I think if Apple enters the space with a non-invasive tool it'll be a huge boon for causal glucose monitoring. I also think it could be a more accessible option for people who are interested using a CGM to treat their diabetes but can't/won't use one of the existing options due to cost or inconvenience. This seems like a win win and I'm excited to see where it goes. Here in Germany the Dexcom G4 system with Animas Vibe insulin pump became fully covered by the health insurance last November and a couple of weeks ago I got my system working. It is a pretty amazing improvement to my life: both the pump and CGM. The G4 transmitter has a 2.4 GHz radio and I built an extra device with Wixel and Bluetooth to transfer the data so my Android phone so xDrip+ and my Android watch can display the glucose values real time. It works so great that my A1c levels been going down from over 7 Continue reading >>

About The New York Times Saying Apple Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Is Years Off

About The New York Times Saying Apple Noninvasive Glucose Monitoring Is Years Off

an interesting piece on Apple Watch highlighting medical uses for the device. One tidbit included in the article is that Apple continues to work on noninvasive glucose monitoring, followed by a comment that it was years off. Dont make too much of that one way or another, however, because the years off comment was attributed to unnamed industry experts, not an internal Apple source. Apple wants to do away with this sort of thing Separately, Apple is continuing research on a noninvasive continuous glucose reader, according to two people with knowledge of the project. The technology is still considered to be years away, industry experts said. Mind you, those experts could well be rightthey are experts, after all. But, industry experts dont know whats happening inside of Apple. If they did, this story would be about a leak, not expert opinion. So, take it with a grain of salt. The reality is that lots of money has been spent on noninvasive glucose monitoring by a lot of companies and universities for a long time. Apple might be close to a solution, or not, but we know that Apple is working hard on the problem. And I, who happens to be an expert on Apple, knows the company can do things experts say it cant. Continue reading >>

Taking On Apple? Fitbit Invests In A Glucose-monitoring Startup

Taking On Apple? Fitbit Invests In A Glucose-monitoring Startup

Taking on Apple? Fitbit invests in a glucose-monitoring startup Taking on Apple? Fitbit invests in a glucose-monitoring startup Above: The Fitbit Ionic, which uses another form of glucose-monitoring tech. We've long been used to hearing stories about massive companies like Apple and Google acquiring or investing in startups to further their own technology, but in a surprising move, Fitbit has now invested in the blood sugar-monitoring startup Sano. It's Fitbit's first-ever startup investment in the roughly 11 years it's been around. Fitbit is putting around $6 million into Sano, according to CNBC , which should help the company make its devices better fit for health monitoring than they already are. In the process, it will help give Fitbit an edge in the face of increasing competition from the likes of Apple. Fitbit actually already has some glucose-monitoring technology in its Ionic smartwatch , but Sano's small "patch" might be more efficient. Unfortunately, we know very little about the patch, which monitors glucose through tiny needles that dig into the skin. Because the needles don't go very deep, though, it's reportedly less painful for diabetics than most of the alternatives. On the other hand, the patch hasn't even started shipping out to consumers, and there's a chance it will need approval from the US Food and Drug Administration before it can be sold inside Fitbit devices in the States. The affordability of Fitbit devices and their ability to go comparatively long periods without charges continue to make them an appealing option for health professionals conducting studies. The Sano investment might make Fitbit's devices more appealing still. Last November, for instance, the US government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it had bought 10,0 Continue reading >>

An Apple Watch That Tracks Glucose Could Be Years Away, Says Report

An Apple Watch That Tracks Glucose Could Be Years Away, Says Report

An Apple Watch that tracks glucose could be years away, says report Serious health tracking feature still very much a work in progress It seems like the idea that the Apple Watch could one day non-invasively take glucose readings is a long way off from becoming a staple smartwatch feature. That's according to a report in the New York Times , which explores how the Watch could transform into a fully fledged health monitoring wearable. According to two people with knowledge of the project, Apple is continuing its research into noninvasive glucose readers, but industry experts said the technology to make it a possibility is still considered to be years away. Read this: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation The report also claims that research on the subject has been a few years in the works and was one of the features considered for the first generation Apple Watch. It seems that when the company saw what impact health tracking features like this would have on the watch size and battery life, it decided to alter its approach to building the wearable. That research apparently was authorised by Steve Jobs who was managing diabetes during the same time he was fighting pancreatic cancer according to people familiar with the events. Jobs was said to hate having to prick his finger to draw blood and gave the go ahead to start exploring how to put an end to the invasive method of generating a reading. We previously reported that Apple had hired a small team of biomedical engineers to build a non-invasive sensor for monitoring glucose levels, according to CNBC , and had even started clinical trials in the Bay Area, while working with consultants to navigate tricky health regulations. The report said that the project had been ongoing for at least five years, and as of a year ago had Continue reading >>

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Dexcom and Fitbit team up to develop smartwatch that measures blood sugar 08 September 2017 A technological breakthrough means smart watches could pave the way for diagnosing diabetes people in the future. A study, based on data from 14,000 users of DeepHeart, a popular Apple Watch app, has shown the wearable technology was able to identify people with diabetes with 85% accuracy. Examples of wearable technology include Apple Watch, Android Wear and Fitbit. The technology comprises a built-in sensor which works alongside a "neural network". The DeepHeart app uses an artificial intelligence algorithm that takes into account the wearer's heart rate and step count. The heart and pancreas are linked via the body's nervous system , so when a person starts to develop diabetes their heart pattern changes. The pioneering wearable kit also showed it could accurately detect high cholesterol, high blood pressure and sleep apnea to 74%, 81% and 83% accuracy respectively. The research was a joint project between a health app development company health app Cardiogram and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). Cardiogram co-founder Johnson Hsieh said: "Researchers at Cardiogram and UCSF validated the accuracy of DeepHeart, a deep neural network, in distinguishing between people with and without diabetes, achieving 85 per cent accuracy on a large data set which included 200 million heart rate and step count measurements." Early detection of type 2 diabetes could help people seek treatment much earlier, which in the long term means they could avoid further related health complications . Brandon Ballinger, another Cardiogram co-founder, said: "While there ha Continue reading >>

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal To Bring Glucose Monitoring Data To Its Ionic Smartwatch

Fitbit Announces Deal to Bring Glucose Monitoring Data to its Ionic Smartwatch Friday September 8, 2017 3:48 AM PDT by Tim Hardwick Fitbit has announced a new partnership with glucose monitoring device company Dexcom that is set to bring diabetes monitoring capabilities to the fitness tracker company's new Ionic smartwatch. The deal initially means Ionic users will be able to connect a Dexcom device to the Fitbit app and seamlessly transfer up-to-date glucose level data to the smartwatch, making the information more easily accessible on their wrist. "The collaboration between Dexcom and Fitbit is an important step in providing useful information to people with diabetes that is both convenient and discreet," said Kevin Sayer, President and CEO, Dexcom. "We believe that providing Dexcom CGM data on Fitbit Ionic, and making that experience available to users of both Android and iOS devices, will have a positive impact on the way people manage their diabetes." There's nothing in the partnership to suggest the Ionic smartwatch will be able to give continuous glucose monitoring readouts on its own when it's released next month current continuous glucose monitoring systems require a small sensor that's worn under the skin to monitor glucose levels but Fitbit shares jumped 13 percent on the news, a high for the company since January, when it laid off some of its employees and announced its smartwatch plans. Dexcom also has a deal with Apple to bring its features to the Apple Watch this year, while owners of Dexcom monitors can already view their glucose data on an Apple Watch advanced devices by Dexcom include a transmitter, which can display glucose information directly to an iPhone app. Apple is thought to be working on a non-invasive real-time glucose monitor for a future v Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Can Detect Early Signs Of Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Study Finds

Apple Watch Can Detect Early Signs Of Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Study Finds

Apple Watch can detect early signs of diabetes with 85% accuracy, study finds Amid rumors that Apple is working on a non-invasive glucose monitoring system for Apple Watch, researchers are using cutting edge software science to prove the heart rate sensors in current-generation wearables can successfully detect early signs of diabetes. As part of an ongoing study involving Apple Watch and Android Wear users, researchers at app developer Cardiogram and the University of California, San Francisco, trained a deep neural network called DeepHeart to distinguish people with and without diabetes at an accuracy of 85 percent. The collaborative study pulled from 14,011 Cardiogram users enrolled with the UCSF Health eHeart Study to obtain 33,628 person-weeks of health sensor data. This information was used to train DeepHeart, which was presented with samples from people with and without diabetes, hypertension, sleep apnea, atrial fibrillation and high cholesterol, according to Cardiogram co-founder Johnson Hsieh. "Typical deep learning algorithms are data-hungry, requiring millions of labeled examples, but in medicine, each label represents a human life at risk for example, a person who recently suffered a heart attack or experienced an abnormal heart rhythm," Hsieh said in a prepared statement. "To solve this challenge, researchers applied two semi-supervised deep learning techniques ('unsupervised sequence pretraining' and 'weakly-supervised heuristic pretraining') which made use of both labeled and unlabeled heart rate data to improve accuracy." Hsieh notes a correlation between diabetes and a body's autonomic nervous system allows DeepHeart to detect the disease through heart rate readings. Specifically, as people develop early stage diabetes, their pattern of heart rate var Continue reading >>

Review: Latest Apple Watch Shows Potential As Very Sweet Medical Device

Review: Latest Apple Watch Shows Potential As Very Sweet Medical Device

Review: Latest Apple Watch shows potential as very sweet medical device The cellular function of the Apple Watch Series 3 represents an important advance for anyone managing a chronic condition. The cellular function of the Apple Watch Series 3 represents an important advance for anyone managing a chronic condition. (Associated Press) I went into a test drive of the Apple Watch Series 3 thinking it could be a real game changer for diabetes management. Now Im thinking it should be considered by anyone with a chronic illness. First, the most important Series 3 feature for people with diabetes isnt available yet, but it will be soon, maybe within the next few months, after the Food and Drug Administration gives its blessing. I have Type 1 diabetes the autoimmune kind, not the more common Type 2 typically associated with obesity. Like many Type 1s, I wear a sensor on my abdomen called a continuous glucose monitor to measure my blood sugar level. This technology has been around for about a decade, but its only within the last few years that the accuracy of continuous glucose monitors has gotten good enough to count on. Heres how it works: My sensor, made by San Diegos Dexcom, sends my glucose numbers to my iPhone , which in turn transmits them to my Pebble smartwatch for easy viewing. Very convenient. Soon, however, the Series 3 will cut the iPhone out of the equation, allowing my sensor to interact directly with the watch via Bluetooth. That means if I leave my phone at home, or if Im at the gym, Ill still have ready access to my numbers. Los Angeles Times cosumer columnist David Lazarus reviews the Apple Watch Series 3. Los Angeles Times cosumer columnist David Lazarus reviews the Apple Watch Series 3. That may not sound like much to someone with a working pancreas. But f Continue reading >>

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

Even before the Apple Watch was introduced, there were rumors surrounding the companys interest in developing a wearable device capable of monitoring a users glucose levels in a non-invasive manner. Without question, such an advancement in glucose monitoring would represent an immense medical breakthrough as it would be a godsend for diabetics who typically have to measure their glucose levels multiple times a day. While various startups and established biotech companies have spent decades trying to crack non-invasive glucose monitoring with no real success to speak of, rumblings of Apples continued interest in the field have persisted for years now. Indeed, a new report from The New York Times relays that Apples research into non-invasive glucose monitoring remains ongoing. Interestingly enough, we learn that the impetus from Apples interest in the field stems from Steve Jobs own battle with diabetes. In the last months of Steve Jobss life, the Apple co-founder fought cancer while managing diabetes. Because he hated pricking his finger to draw blood, Mr. Jobs authorized an Apple research team to develop a noninvasive glucose reader with technology that could potentially be incorporated into a wristwatch, according to people familiar with the events The original Apple Watch, which saw development begin after Jobs passing, has since become an incredibly popular health and fitness tracker. Indeed, just recently a rumor emerged claiming that future Apple Watch models may incorporate an EKG heart monitor as a means to detect significant heart ailments ahead of time. As for Apples interest in non-invasive glucose monitoring, that solution, if one is ever discovered, remains years away according to the Times. Indeed, John L. Smith, one of the worlds foremost experts on non-i Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch vs diabetes: The glucose monitoring story so far How Apple's smartwatch could evolve into a smarter health device For as long as the Apple Watch has been rumoured, there have been murmurs that the company will one day build a wearable that is capable of offering continuous glucose monitoring. Suffice it to say, that would be a big deal for a lot of people not just diabetics. The Apple Watch isn't quite there yet in terms of offering this serious health tracking feature, but it seems as if it's working to try and make it happen. Essential reading: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation As Apple continues to make a bigger push into health, we explore how the smartwatch is already working with glucose monitoring devices, the challenges Tim Cook and company face to offer the monitoring from its its own wearable and how it could actually take shape. If you're looking to check your glucose right now, there is a way to do this with the Apple Watch. All you need is a device from Dexcom, the biggest name in continuous glucose monitoring these days. Specifically, you'll need the Dexcom G5 CGM mobile system, which will pair with the Dexcom G5 Mobile app. You'll then be able to see your glucose levels right there on your Watch. Eventually, Dexcom plans to upgrade its app for watchOS 4 support, which will take advantage of core Bluetooth to pair your Dexcom device directly with your Apple Watch. That way you won't need your iPhone to act as an intermediary. Read this: How wearables are helping the lives of diabetics It's been a couple months since watchOS 4 dropped, so it's easy to wonder whether Fitbit's deal with Dexcom has killed the Apple Watch update, but it's likely the watchOS 4 support has been held up by the FDA (we'll get back around to this in a bit). There's als Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Tim Cook has been spotted at the Apple campus test-driving a device that tracks blood sugar, which was connected to his Apple Watch. A source said that Cook was wearing a prototype glucose-tracker on the Apple Watch, which points to future applications that would make the device a "must have" for millions of people with diabetes -- or at risk for the disease. As CNBC reported last month, Apple has a team in Palo Alto working on the "holy grail" for diabetes: Non-invasive and continuous glucose monitoring. The current glucose trackers on the market rely on tiny sensors penetrating the skin. Sources said the company is already conducting feasibility trials in the Bay Area. Tim Cook also talked about the device to a roomful of students in February at the University of Glasgow, where he received an honorary degree. He didn't say if it was a medical device from a company like Medtronic or Dexcom, or an Apple prototype. "I've been wearing a continuous glucose monitor for a few weeks," he said. "I just took it off before coming on this trip." Cook explained that he was able to understand how his blood sugar responded to foods he was eating. He made modifications to keep his blood sugar more constant. In Silicon Valley, a huge health trend is low-carb, high fat diets. Increasingly, venture capitalists and executives are finding that if they cut down their sugar consumption, they see dramatic results including increased productivity and weight loss. Cook has a lot of interest in personal health. For instance, he's also an active gym-goer, and recently told CNBC's Jim Cramer that he has lost 30 pounds. At the University of Glasgow, he reiterated Apple's commitment to the health space and spoke about the struggles faced by people with diabetes. "It's mentally anguishing to stick y Continue reading >>

Dariohealth Granted 510(k) Clearance For Apple Lightning-compatible Glucose Monitor

Dariohealth Granted 510(k) Clearance For Apple Lightning-compatible Glucose Monitor

DarioHealth granted 510(k) clearance for Apple Lightning-compatible glucose monitor Israel-based DarioHealth has been granted 510(k) clearance for a version of its Blood Glucose Monitoring System that, alongside the Dario app, is compatible with iPhone 7, 8, and X, according to a statement from the company. Weve been working tirelessly to bring forth a solution that would meet the rigorous standards required to achieve the FDA clearance, DarioHealth CEO and Chairman Erez Raphael said in a statement. This is a big breakthrough to receive the FDAs marketing clearance for the Dario product on iPhone 7, 8, and X, and allows many of our past users who upgraded to these new iPhones to renew their Dario experience. This continues DarioHealths US market progress, and truly opens the door for wide-scale expansion in this pivotal market. Darios system consists of a pocket-sized device that includes a glucose meter, disposable test strip cartridge, a lancing device, and a companion smartphone app. DarioHealth initially received FDA clearance for the digital diabetes monitoring system in December 2015, but due to the hardwares reliance on a 3.5mm headphone jack, the company was among the many health device companies left out in the cold when Apple announced its controversial decision to remove the jack in favor of the Apple-specific Lightning connector alone. "This [3.5mm jack removal] news comes as no surprise to us, and we've been working on a solution for quite some time now," Raphael said in 2016. "Our team's agility to navigate the complex mobile ecosystem showcases DarioHealth's versatility and passion to be at the forefront of cutting-edge technology in general, and the diabetes healthcare market specifically." DarioHealths Lightning-compatible system received a CE Mark in Continue reading >>

Fitbit Could Add Glucose Monitors To Future Health-monitoring Devices

Fitbit Could Add Glucose Monitors To Future Health-monitoring Devices

Fitbit could add glucose monitors to future health-monitoring devices It just invested in a company developing a minimally invasive glucose tracker. Fitbit just invested over $6 million in a company called Sano that's working on a coin-sized patch that monitors blood sugar, CNBC reports. The wearables-maker already incorporates other glucose-tracking devices' data into its Ionic smartwatch , but this investment suggests that the company might be looking to more directly incorporate a monitor into its devices. "This fits into our strategy of looking beyond the device and thinking more about (health) solutions," Fitbit CEO James Park told CNBC. "I think the complete solution comes in the form of having some monitoring solution that is coupled with a display, and a wearable that can give you the interventions at the right moment." Fitbit isn't the only one interested in a built-in blood sugar monitor. Reports surfaced early last year that Apple was working on one itself, but while Sano's product uses tiny needles to take its measurements, Apple has reportedly been chasing a device that has so far proved unattainable -- a non-invasive, continuously monitoring device. For Fitbit, working this kind of feature into its products could be a smart move as some of its competitors have started to move past them in the wearables field. While Fitbit previously dominated the market , it lost quite a bit of market share to Apple and Xiaomi last year, both of which took turns leading the market last year, quarter to quarter. Park stopped short of saying future Fitbit devices will have built-in blood sugar monitors, naturally, but this investment shows the company is at least interested in that direction. Sano's tracker won't be available to consumers for at least another year. Continue reading >>

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