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Apple Diabetes Monitor

Apple Watch Has Diabetes App

Apple Watch Has Diabetes App

The new Apple Watch is able to use an app that can monitor blood glucose levels. The app was designed by DexCom and can track and display glucose levels in the form of a graph. DexCom’s glucose monitor will take the form of a body sensor that you wear around your abdomen. The body sensor measures your blood glucose levels every five minutes and sends the information to a remote handheld device within 20 feet. This device is then able to communicate with the iPhone, which then sends the data to the Apple Watch to be displayed. The advantage is that you can just look at your watch rather than having to check your iPhone or DexCom’s remote handheld device. DexCom offers two apps through their Share System; one is installed on the user’s device allowing the data to be viewed by the user; the second app is installed on another person’s device with whom the user wants to share the data—perhaps a doctor or a caregiver. Continue reading >>

The Apple Watch Can Detect Diabetes With An 85% Accuracy, Cardiogram Study Says

The Apple Watch Can Detect Diabetes With An 85% Accuracy, Cardiogram Study Says

According to Cardiogram founder Brandon Ballingers latest clinical study, the Apple Watch can detect diabetes in those previously diagnosed with the disease with an 85 percent accuracy. The study is part of the larger DeepHeart study with Cardiogram and UCSF. This particular study used data from 14,000 Apple Watch users and was able to detect that 462 of them had diabetes by using the Watchs heart rate sensor, the same type of sensor other fitness bands using Android Wear also integrate into their systems. In 2015, the Framingham Heart Study showed that resting heart rate and heart rate variability significantly predicted incident diabetes and hypertension. This led to the impetus to use the Watchs heart rate sensor to see if it could accurately detect a diabetic patient. Previously, Ballinger and his colleagues were able to use Apples Watch to detect an abnormal heart rhythm with up to a 97 percent accuracy, sleep apnea with a 90 percent accuracy and hypertension with an 82 percent accuracy when paired with Cardiograms AI-based algorithm. Most of these discoveries have been published in clinical journals or abstracts and Ballinger intends to publish the latest findings shortly after presenting at the AAAI 2018 conference this week. Diabetes is a huge and growing problem in the U.S. More than 100 million U.S. adults are now living with pre-diabetes or diabetes and more than 1 in 4 of them go undiagnosed, according to the CDC. Part of the problem is the pain that goes into checking blood glucose levels. A patient must prick themselves after every meal and correctly take the right amount of insulin to keep themselves in balance. Early detection could also help in cutting down on diabetes-related diseases before they get out of hand. While there have been other attempts t Continue reading >>

Fitbit, Apple, Startups Explore Blood-sugar Tracking For Diet, Health - Business Insider

Fitbit, Apple, Startups Explore Blood-sugar Tracking For Diet, Health - Business Insider

Ashwin Pushpala, the founder of Sano, believes his device could eventually provide an instant snapshot of how the food we eat affects our bodies. This kind of feedback could render things like nutrition labels and fad diets unnecessary. "Ideally, you'd be able to use it to choose a diet based on real data," Pushpala told Business Insider. The device Sano is working on does not involve a needle and would connect to a smartphone app, letting users could check their blood-sugar levels anytime. For most people, the most important moments to do that would be before and after eating, to see how a particular meal affected their blood sugar. In someone without diabetes, blood sugar always rises after eating. But the contents of a meal can strongly affect how the body responds. Eat a breakfast of sugary cereal or a bagel, and blood sugar spikes. After that type of carb-heavy meal, someone might look at their readings, see a dramatic rise, and say, "Whoa! What was that?"' Edward Damiano , a diabetes researcher and professor of biomedical engineering at Boston University, told Business Insider. Damiano also co-founded Beta Bionics, a public, for-profit benefit corporation that is developing a bionic pancreas for people with Type I diabetes. That spike would tell them their food was too high in carbs and too low in other key nutrients like protein, fiber, and fat. On the other hand, if they ate a more balanced meal with protein, fiber, and fat such as a dinner of grilled salmon, roasted Brussels sprouts, and half of a baked potato their glucose levels would remain relatively balanced and flat. "They'll see how that helps keep things steady," Damiano said. "They'll start looking at foods differently." "When I first started using the CGM and getting my readings, it honestly felt lik Continue reading >>

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch App 85 Per Cent Accurate In Diagnosing Diabetes

Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Apple Watch app 85 per cent accurate in diagnosing diabetes Dexcom and Fitbit team up to develop smartwatch that measures blood sugar 08 September 2017 A technological breakthrough means smart watches could pave the way for diagnosing diabetes people in the future. A study, based on data from 14,000 users of DeepHeart, a popular Apple Watch app, has shown the wearable technology was able to identify people with diabetes with 85% accuracy. Examples of wearable technology include Apple Watch, Android Wear and Fitbit. The technology comprises a built-in sensor which works alongside a "neural network". The DeepHeart app uses an artificial intelligence algorithm that takes into account the wearer's heart rate and step count. The heart and pancreas are linked via the body's nervous system , so when a person starts to develop diabetes their heart pattern changes. The pioneering wearable kit also showed it could accurately detect high cholesterol, high blood pressure and sleep apnea to 74%, 81% and 83% accuracy respectively. The research was a joint project between a health app development company health app Cardiogram and the University of California San Francisco (UCSF). Cardiogram co-founder Johnson Hsieh said: "Researchers at Cardiogram and UCSF validated the accuracy of DeepHeart, a deep neural network, in distinguishing between people with and without diabetes, achieving 85 per cent accuracy on a large data set which included 200 million heart rate and step count measurements." Early detection of type 2 diabetes could help people seek treatment much earlier, which in the long term means they could avoid further related health complications . Brandon Ballinger, another Cardiogram co-founder, said: "While there ha Continue reading >>

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

The Apple Watch Wont Be Able To Measure Glucose Levels Anytime Soon, If Ever

Even before the Apple Watch was introduced, there were rumors surrounding the companys interest in developing a wearable device capable of monitoring a users glucose levels in a non-invasive manner. Without question, such an advancement in glucose monitoring would represent an immense medical breakthrough as it would be a godsend for diabetics who typically have to measure their glucose levels multiple times a day. While various startups and established biotech companies have spent decades trying to crack non-invasive glucose monitoring with no real success to speak of, rumblings of Apples continued interest in the field have persisted for years now. Indeed, a new report from The New York Times relays that Apples research into non-invasive glucose monitoring remains ongoing. Interestingly enough, we learn that the impetus from Apples interest in the field stems from Steve Jobs own battle with diabetes. In the last months of Steve Jobss life, the Apple co-founder fought cancer while managing diabetes. Because he hated pricking his finger to draw blood, Mr. Jobs authorized an Apple research team to develop a noninvasive glucose reader with technology that could potentially be incorporated into a wristwatch, according to people familiar with the events The original Apple Watch, which saw development begin after Jobs passing, has since become an incredibly popular health and fitness tracker. Indeed, just recently a rumor emerged claiming that future Apple Watch models may incorporate an EKG heart monitor as a means to detect significant heart ailments ahead of time. As for Apples interest in non-invasive glucose monitoring, that solution, if one is ever discovered, remains years away according to the Times. Indeed, John L. Smith, one of the worlds foremost experts on non-i Continue reading >>

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Apple’s Needleless Blood Sugar Tracker Has An Uphill Battle In Front Of It

Rumors are flying that Apple is developing some kind of wearable that would continuously track the user’s blood sugar without breaking their skin. For people with diabetes, this would be a huge improvement over the somewhat invasive or downright painful options they currently rely on. But experts warn that if the rumors are true, Apple will be facing a scientific and technological battlefield littered with decades of other companies’ failures. If Apple is chasing a needleless blood sugar monitor, it wouldn’t be that surprising. (Apple declined to comment.) After all, the market would be massive. About 30 million Americans have diabetes, a disease caused when there’s too much sugar, or glucose, in the blood. People with diabetes have to carefully titrate their food intake, or even inject the hormone insulin in order to keep their blood sugar from spiking or dropping to dangerous levels. So regularly measuring blood glucose is key. Right now, it’s also unpleasant. People with diabetes have to prick their fingers to draw blood, or wear a monitor that inserts a tiny tube beneath their skin to continuously measure glucose in the fluid between cells (the same fluid that spills out when you pop a blister). So a needleless device — preferably one that continuously monitors glucose levels and spits them out in real time — would be a huge upgrade. “That is the holy grail,” says Eric Topol, the director of the Scripps Translational Science Institute who also sits on the board of glucose monitor manufacturer Dexcom. And that’s why so many before Apple have made the attempt. Google tried to develop a contact lens to detect glucose in tears, but ever since pharmaceutical giant Novartis licensed the technology in 2014, the project’s gone quiet. (A spokesperson fo Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Spots Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Report Claims

Apple Watch Spots Diabetes With 85% Accuracy, Report Claims

A new study claims heart rate data collected by the Apple Watch can be used to successfully detect diabetes in those who wear the smartwatch. The study was conducted by Cardiogram, a company which produces an app able to break down heart rate data captured by Apple Watches. It is claimed the Watch can detect diabetes in patients previously diagnosed with the disease with an 85 percent accuracy. However, the company states this is only useful in spotting potential signs of diabetes, not for diagnosing the disease or providing advice on insulin requirements. The app looks out for variations in heart rate which are known to correlate with diabetes, but it cannot diagnose the disease outright. Without FDA approval, the system can only tell the Watch wearer that something is up and they should seek medical advice. The firm has previously claimed the Apple Watch can detect abnormal heart rhythm with 97 percent accuracy, sleep apnea with 90 percent accuracy and hypertension with an accuracy of 82 percent . Cardiogram worked with researchers from the University of California, San Francisco and used the firm's DeepHeart neural network to determine that the Watch was able to spot the signs of diabetes in patients previously diagnosed with the disease. The data can spot irregular an heart rate which correlates to diabetes The study involved more than 200 million sensor measurements taken from 14,011 participants. A huge and growing problem in the US, it is claimed by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) that over 100 million American adults have diabetes or prediabetes. Of those, just over 30 million currently have the disease, amounting to 9.4 percent of the US population. If not treated, prediabetes often leads to type two diabetes within five years if not treat Continue reading >>

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Apple Ceo Tim Cook Test-drove A Device That Tracks His Blood Sugar, Hinting At Apple's Interest In The Space

Tim Cook has been spotted at the Apple campus test-driving a device that tracks blood sugar, which was connected to his Apple Watch. A source said that Cook was wearing a prototype glucose-tracker on the Apple Watch, which points to future applications that would make the device a "must have" for millions of people with diabetes -- or at risk for the disease. As CNBC reported last month, Apple has a team in Palo Alto working on the "holy grail" for diabetes: Non-invasive and continuous glucose monitoring. The current glucose trackers on the market rely on tiny sensors penetrating the skin. Sources said the company is already conducting feasibility trials in the Bay Area. Tim Cook also talked about the device to a roomful of students in February at the University of Glasgow, where he received an honorary degree. He didn't say if it was a medical device from a company like Medtronic or Dexcom, or an Apple prototype. "I've been wearing a continuous glucose monitor for a few weeks," he said. "I just took it off before coming on this trip." Cook explained that he was able to understand how his blood sugar responded to foods he was eating. He made modifications to keep his blood sugar more constant. In Silicon Valley, a huge health trend is low-carb, high fat diets. Increasingly, venture capitalists and executives are finding that if they cut down their sugar consumption, they see dramatic results including increased productivity and weight loss. Cook has a lot of interest in personal health. For instance, he's also an active gym-goer, and recently told CNBC's Jim Cramer that he has lost 30 pounds. At the University of Glasgow, he reiterated Apple's commitment to the health space and spoke about the struggles faced by people with diabetes. "It's mentally anguishing to stick y Continue reading >>

Sensors To Monitor Blood Sugar Level | Apple's Diabetes Sensors

Sensors To Monitor Blood Sugar Level | Apple's Diabetes Sensors

Share on Facebook Share on Twitter Share on Linkedin Share on Google+ Share on Xing Headquartered in Cupertino, California, Apple is American technology company that was founded by Steve Jobs, Steve Wozniak, and Ronald Wayne in 1976. The company has a particular interest in designing, developing and selling computer software, consumer electronics, and provision of online services. Apple holds a flexible segment of the market with some of their valuable products being the iPhone, iPad, MacOS and the iPod. The world today has been invaded by dozens of diseases and other complicated health conditions. Some conditions are deadly and life daring, talk of cancer, diabetes, and many others. Diabetes is alleged to affect 25.8 million people in the US alone, and regardless of the fact that large enterprises are profit oriented, Apple has chosen to humans. The company, worlds second largest manufacturer of phones by volume after Samsung, has decided to invest their electronic expertise to beat these diseases secretly. Apples team working on the development of diabetes sensors to monitor blood sugar According to the CNMB reports, a secret group of biomedical engineers hired by Apple is working to develop blood sugar level monitoring sensors. Johnny Srouji, the senior vice president of hardware technologies, Apple is said to lead the team. It is reported that Steve Jobs had launched the initiative before meeting his death. These teams of about 30 experts were acquired from companies such as Corp, Sano, Medtronic, Masimo , and C8 Medsensors and are rumored to be working on a little-known apartment in Palo Alto, California. The team is focused to scrapping blood sugar monitoring by the painful finger pricking method. The constant finger pricking technique has proved, unhygienic and Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Can Tell Whether Youve Got Diabetes With 85% Accuracy

Apple Watch Can Tell Whether Youve Got Diabetes With 85% Accuracy

Apple Watch can tell whether youve got diabetes with 85% accuracy The medical benefits of Apple's 329 smartwatch have again been brought to light, this time as a tool for detecting early signs of diabetes THE Apple Watch can detect early signs of diabetes with 85 per cent accuracy using its built-in heart rate sensor, according to a clinical study. The research tapped into data from 14,000 Apple Watch users and was able to detect that 462 of them had diabetes, with a little help from an artificial intelligence algorithm. The heart rate sensor in an Apple Watch and other smartwatches can be used to detect early signs of diabetes According to Diabetes UK, almost 3.6 million Brits suffer from diabetes, making it the "fastest growing health threat" facing the country. The latest study - a collaboration betweenUniversity of California San Francisco (USCF) and Apple Watch app-maker Cardiogram - is the latest to push the health benefits of the popular smartwatch, which shifted 18 million units in the last three months of 2017 alone. 3.6 million people are suffering from diabetes in the UK It's estimated that the NHS spends about 10 billion on diabetes every year (10 percent of its budget) Approximately 90 percent of diabetes cases are Type 2, which is largely preventable or manageable by lifestyle changes 1 in 4 people with diabetes are undiagnosed, that's nearly 1 million people Based on current trends, it's estimated that 4.9 million Brits will have diabetes by the year 2035. Researchers from USCF fed the mound of heart rate data to Cardiogram's DeepHeart algorithm to help train it (AI systems typically require vast amounts of information to help them to get smarter). Because your heart is connected with your pancreas, via the body's automatic nervous system, people who dev Continue reading >>

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch Vs Diabetes: The Glucose Monitoring Story So Far

Apple Watch vs diabetes: The glucose monitoring story so far How Apple's smartwatch could evolve into a smarter health device For as long as the Apple Watch has been rumoured, there have been murmurs that the company will one day build a wearable that is capable of offering continuous glucose monitoring. Suffice it to say, that would be a big deal for a lot of people not just diabetics. The Apple Watch isn't quite there yet in terms of offering this serious health tracking feature, but it seems as if it's working to try and make it happen. Essential reading: Apple Watch Series 4 investigation As Apple continues to make a bigger push into health, we explore how the smartwatch is already working with glucose monitoring devices, the challenges Tim Cook and company face to offer the monitoring from its its own wearable and how it could actually take shape. If you're looking to check your glucose right now, there is a way to do this with the Apple Watch. All you need is a device from Dexcom, the biggest name in continuous glucose monitoring these days. Specifically, you'll need the Dexcom G5 CGM mobile system, which will pair with the Dexcom G5 Mobile app. You'll then be able to see your glucose levels right there on your Watch. Eventually, Dexcom plans to upgrade its app for watchOS 4 support, which will take advantage of core Bluetooth to pair your Dexcom device directly with your Apple Watch. That way you won't need your iPhone to act as an intermediary. Read this: How wearables are helping the lives of diabetics It's been a couple months since watchOS 4 dropped, so it's easy to wonder whether Fitbit's deal with Dexcom has killed the Apple Watch update, but it's likely the watchOS 4 support has been held up by the FDA (we'll get back around to this in a bit). There's als Continue reading >>

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

The Best Diabetes Apps Of The Year

We’ve selected these apps based on their quality, user reviews, and overall reliability as a source of support for people living with diabetes. If you want to nominate an app for this list, email us at [email protected] The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) estimate that type 1, type 2, and gestational diabetes impacts 29 million Americans, about 9 percent of the population. Someone with diabetes may experience complications such as kidney problems, blindness, or heart failure, according to the CDC. The good news is that with increased education, people are recognizing symptoms, like going to the bathroom often, having blurry vision, losing weight, experiencing tingling or numbness in lower limbs, and feeling very thirsty, hungry, or tired. Thanks to earlier diagnoses, improved treatment tools, and better self-care, people are living better with diabetes. Part of that care includes eating healthy foods, exercising, taking medicines like insulin, sticking to your treatment plan, and being proactive about colds and other sicknesses. Keeping all the pieces of your care plan straightforward can be a challenge, but several apps have emerged to help you track your day and your health. While some of these apps are specifically for diabetes and some are geared for general diet, they can all help you take control of your health. Here are this year’s top picks for the best diabetes apps. iPhone rating: ★★★★★ Android rating: ★★★★★ Price: Free Fooducate promises to be your weight loss coach. This app has a grading system designed to help you make smarter choices. It will help you understand the pros and cons of certain foods. In addition to sugar counts, the app helps you monitor carbs, colorings, mood, hunger, sleep, and exercise. R Continue reading >>

Apple Watch's Heart Rate Sensor Can Detect Diabetes, Cardiogram Study Finds

Apple Watch's Heart Rate Sensor Can Detect Diabetes, Cardiogram Study Finds

Apple Watch's heart rate sensor can detect diabetes, Cardiogram study finds Another way Apple Watch can save your life. Use commas to separate multiple email addresses The tiny Apple Watches on our wrists have already saved lives . Not only do they keep us more active, they can also detect a variety of heart diseases without needing any additional bands or accessories. But a new study by Cardiogram is taking it one step further. The mobile health data companys deep learning network, DeepHeart, already uses data from the Apple Watch ($429 on Apple.com ) heart rate sensor to detect atrial fibrillation , hypertension, and sleep apnea. Now its adding a new disease to the list: diabetes. While Apple and Google have been rumored to be working on hardware capable of monitoring glucose levels , Cardiograms study used nothing more than machine learning and the Apple Watchs heart rate sensor to detect whether a user has diabetes. The heart rate sensor that you wear already from the Apple Watch may actually be able to detect signs of diabetes, Cardiogram co-founder Brandon Ballinger told Macworld. In the end, the final accuracy was 85 percent, which is pretty high for performing wrist applications." [ Further reading: Everything you need to know about iOS 11 ] The impact on you at home: Apple is selling more watches than ever, and the vast majority of people are using them mainly for their health and fitness benefits. Weve heard numerous stories of how Apple Watchs heart rate sensor has saved people from heart attacks and pulmonary embolisms, and Cardiogram's research on atrial fibrillation last year ended up mirroring Apple's own study in watchOS 4. But diabetes detection ups the ante considerably. If we can start extrapolating the heart-rate data from Apple Watch to detect ailm Continue reading >>

Taking On Apple? Fitbit Invests In A Glucose-monitoring Startup

Taking On Apple? Fitbit Invests In A Glucose-monitoring Startup

Taking on Apple? Fitbit invests in a glucose-monitoring startup Taking on Apple? Fitbit invests in a glucose-monitoring startup Above: The Fitbit Ionic, which uses another form of glucose-monitoring tech. We've long been used to hearing stories about massive companies like Apple and Google acquiring or investing in startups to further their own technology, but in a surprising move, Fitbit has now invested in the blood sugar-monitoring startup Sano. It's Fitbit's first-ever startup investment in the roughly 11 years it's been around. Fitbit is putting around $6 million into Sano, according to CNBC , which should help the company make its devices better fit for health monitoring than they already are. In the process, it will help give Fitbit an edge in the face of increasing competition from the likes of Apple. Fitbit actually already has some glucose-monitoring technology in its Ionic smartwatch , but Sano's small "patch" might be more efficient. Unfortunately, we know very little about the patch, which monitors glucose through tiny needles that dig into the skin. Because the needles don't go very deep, though, it's reportedly less painful for diabetics than most of the alternatives. On the other hand, the patch hasn't even started shipping out to consumers, and there's a chance it will need approval from the US Food and Drug Administration before it can be sold inside Fitbit devices in the States. The affordability of Fitbit devices and their ability to go comparatively long periods without charges continue to make them an appealing option for health professionals conducting studies. The Sano investment might make Fitbit's devices more appealing still. Last November, for instance, the US government's National Institutes of Health (NIH) announced that it had bought 10,0 Continue reading >>

Review: Latest Apple Watch Shows Potential As Very Sweet Medical Device

Review: Latest Apple Watch Shows Potential As Very Sweet Medical Device

Review: Latest Apple Watch shows potential as very sweet medical device The cellular function of the Apple Watch Series 3 represents an important advance for anyone managing a chronic condition. The cellular function of the Apple Watch Series 3 represents an important advance for anyone managing a chronic condition. (Associated Press) I went into a test drive of the Apple Watch Series 3 thinking it could be a real game changer for diabetes management. Now Im thinking it should be considered by anyone with a chronic illness. First, the most important Series 3 feature for people with diabetes isnt available yet, but it will be soon, maybe within the next few months, after the Food and Drug Administration gives its blessing. I have Type 1 diabetes the autoimmune kind, not the more common Type 2 typically associated with obesity. Like many Type 1s, I wear a sensor on my abdomen called a continuous glucose monitor to measure my blood sugar level. This technology has been around for about a decade, but its only within the last few years that the accuracy of continuous glucose monitors has gotten good enough to count on. Heres how it works: My sensor, made by San Diegos Dexcom, sends my glucose numbers to my iPhone , which in turn transmits them to my Pebble smartwatch for easy viewing. Very convenient. Soon, however, the Series 3 will cut the iPhone out of the equation, allowing my sensor to interact directly with the watch via Bluetooth. That means if I leave my phone at home, or if Im at the gym, Ill still have ready access to my numbers. Los Angeles Times cosumer columnist David Lazarus reviews the Apple Watch Series 3. Los Angeles Times cosumer columnist David Lazarus reviews the Apple Watch Series 3. That may not sound like much to someone with a working pancreas. But f Continue reading >>

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