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Ankle Discoloration Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

Skin Problems In Diabetes

If you have diabetes, it’s important to be aware of potentially serious skin problems related to the disease and see your doctor before the problem gets out of control. In most cases, skin problems in diabetes can be managed with early diagnosis and treatment. you might like Scleroderma diabeticorum: While rare, this skin problem affects people with type 2 diabetes, causing a thickening of the skin on the back of the neck and upper back. The treatment is to bring your blood sugar level under control. Lotions and moisturizers may help soften skin. Vitiligo: Vitiligo, a skin problem more commonly associated with type 1 diabetes than type 2 diabetes, affects skin coloration. With vitiligo, the special cells that make pigment (the substance that controls skin color) are destroyed, resulting in patches of discolored skin. Vitiligo often affects the chest and abdomen, but may be found on the face around the mouth, nostrils, and eyes. Current treatment options for vitiligo include topical steroids and micropigmentation (tattooing). If you have vitiligo, you should use sunscreen with an SPF of 30 or higher to prevent sunburn on the discolored skin. Acanthosis nigricans. This is a skin problem that results in the darkening and thickening of certain areas of the skin especially in the skin folds. The skin becomes tan or brown and is sometimes slightly raised and described as velvety. Most often the condition, which typically looks like small warts, appears on the sides or back of the neck, the armpits, under the breast, and groin. Occasionally the top of the knuckles will have a particularly unusual appearance. Acanthosis nigricans usually strikes people who are very overweight. While there is no cure for acanthosis nigricans, losing weight may improve the skin condition. Acant Continue reading >>

Diabetic Foot Problems

Diabetic Foot Problems

What foot problems can be caused by diabetes? Diabetes mellitus can cause serious foot problems. These conditions include diabetic neuropathy (loss of normal nerve function) and peripheral vascular disease (loss of normal circulation). These two conditions can lead to: Diabetic foot ulcers: wounds that do not heal or become infected Infections: skin infections (cellulitis), bone infections (osteomyelitis) and pus collections (abscesses) Gangrene: dead tissue resulting from complete loss of circulation Charcot arthropathy: fractures and dislocations that may result in severe deformities Amputation: partial foot, whole foot or below-knee amputation What are the symptoms of a diabetic foot problem? ​Symptoms of neuropathy may include the loss of protective sensation or pain and tingling sensations. Patients may develop a blister, abrasion or wound but may not feel any pain. Decreased circulation may cause skin discoloration, skin temperature changes or pain. Depending on the specific problem that develops, patients may notice swelling, discoloration (red, blue, gray or white skin), red streaks, increased warmth or coolness, injury with no or minimal pain, a wound with or without drainage, staining on socks, tingling pain or deformity. Patients with infection may have fever, chills, shakes, redness, drainage, loss of blood sugar control or shock (unstable blood pressure, confusion and delirium). How do some of these complications develop? ​Neuropathy is associated with the metabolic abnormalities of diabetes. Vascular disease is present in many patients at the time of diagnosis of diabetes. Ulcers may be caused by external pressure or rubbing from a poorly fitting shoe, an injury from walking barefoot, or a foreign object in the shoe (rough seam, stone or tack). Infecti Continue reading >>

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

How Can Diabetes Affect My Feet?

Chronically high blood sugar (glucose) levels can be associated with serious complications in people who have diabetes. The feet are especially at risk. Two conditions called diabetic neuropathy and peripheral vascular disease can damage the feet (and other areas of the body) in people who have diabetes. What is diabetic neuropathy? Chronically high sugar levels associated with uncontrolled diabetes can cause nerve damage that interferes with the ability to sense pain and temperature. This so-called "sensory diabetic neuropathy" increases the risk a person with diabetes will not notice problems with his or her feet. Nearly 10% of people with diabetes develop foot ulcers due to peripheral vascular disease and nerve damage. People with diabetes may not notice sores or cuts on the feet, which in turn can lead to an infection. Nerve damage can also affect the function of foot muscles, leading to improper alignment and injury. What is peripheral vascular disease? Diabetes is associated with poor circulation (blood flow). Inadequate blood flow increases the healing time for cuts and sores. Peripheral vascular disease refers to compromised blood flow in the arms and legs. Poor blood flow increases the risk that infections will not heal. This, in turn, increases the risk of ulcers and gangrene, which is tissue death that occurs in a localized area when there is an inadequate blood supply. What are common foot problems of people with diabetes? The following images show common foot problems that anyone can get; however, those with diabetes are at increased risk for serious complications associated with these conditions, including infection and even amputation. Athlete's foot Fungal infection of the feet is called athlete's foot. Cracked skin, itching, and redness are associated w Continue reading >>

Ankle Rash? Here's What You Should Know

Ankle Rash? Here's What You Should Know

Like other inflammatory skin diseases, a wide range of conditions can cause ankle rashes. Rashes can appear on one or both ankles, and may or may not continue up the leg or down onto the foot. Rashes appearing on the ankle may also originate from further up the leg. A rash on the ankle can be bumpy, scaly, raised or flat. Purple dots on legs can be part of the rash, as can blisters or sores in and around the region. A lower leg rash might appear spotted or include various patterns of coloration. An ankle rash can be bright red or a darker purple or brown color. The causes of an ankle rash vary greatly — from insect bites or contact with a poisonous plant to infections or even autoimmune disorders. There are minor, routine types of ankle rashes, and there are those that indicate a serious problem and require immediate medical attention. Ankle Rash Causes—Infectious Either localized or systemic, infections are one cause of ankle rashes. Infections are mostly communicable diseases that spread by human contact or direct contact with another organism that is carrying the infection. When exposed, the body’s natural reaction is to defend against infection with inflammation, heightened immune activity and even fever. Several types of infections exist that tend to present with a rash on the ankle or lower leg region. These include: Cellulites—a bacterial infection Shingles—a viral infection from the herpes zoster virus Folliculitis—infection of the hair follicles sometimes caused by hair removal activities Measles—an infection with the rubeola virus Tinea corporis—a fungal infection caused by ringworms transferred from cats and dogs or farm animals Strep or Staph—an infection from streptococcal or staphylococcal bacteria Roseola—a viral infection spread by re Continue reading >>

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

10 Diabetic Skin Problems

1 / 11 Are You Suffering From a Diabetes-Related Skin Complication? About a third of people with diabetes will develop skin problems at some point. In fact, some skin issues can be warning signs of diabetes. The good news is that most skin conditions can be treated easily if they’re caught early. Keeping proper control of your blood sugar (glucose) can prevent skin problems and many other diabetes symptoms from happening in the first place. “For the most part, control of diabetes can help with related skin issues,” says Justin Ko, MD, the medical director and service chief of medical dermatology at Stanford Health Care, in Redwood City, California. “I’m always adamant that my diabetic patients take aggressive care of their skin and health in general. For the skin, moisturization, checking feet and legs daily for any blisters, sores, and skin breaks (especially between the toes), and nail care is extremely important. Nail and foot fungus can lead to skin cracks and breaks, allowing bacteria to enter and cause infection.” Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

Diabetes: Foot & Skin Related Complications

How can diabetes affect feet and skin? For people with diabetes, having too much glucose (sugar) in their blood for a long time can cause some serious complications, including foot and skin problems, as well as heart disease, stroke, kidney disease, eye damage, and other problems. How can diabetes affect my feet? Diabetes can cause two problems that can affect your feet: Diabetic neuropathy — Uncontrolled diabetes can damage your nerves. If you have damaged nerves in your legs and feet, you might not feel heat, cold or pain. This lack of feeling is called diabetic neuropathy. If you do not feel a cut or sore on your foot because of neuropathy, the cut could get worse and become infected. Peripheral vascular disease — Diabetes also affects the flow of blood. Without good blood flow, it takes longer for a sore or cut to heal. Poor blood flow in the arms and legs is called peripheral vascular disease. (The word "peripheral" means "located away from a central point," and the word "vascular" refers to the blood vessels. Peripheral vascular disease is a circulation disorder that affects blood vessels away from the heart.) If you have an infection that will not heal because of poor blood flow, you are at risk for developing gangrene, which is the death of tissue due to a lack of blood. To keep gangrene from spreading, the doctor may have to remove a toe, foot, or part of a leg. This procedure is called amputation. Diabetes is the most common, non-traumatic cause of leg amputations. Each year, more than 56,000 people with diabetes have amputations. However, research suggests that more than half of these amputations can be prevented through proper foot care. What are some common foot problems of people with diabetes? Anyone can get the foot problems listed below. For people Continue reading >>

Itchy Ankles: Causes, Rash, And Treatment

Itchy Ankles: Causes, Rash, And Treatment

The medical community refers to an itching feeling anywhere on the body as pruritus. Itchy ankles are often the sign of an underlying skin condition, though the feeling may signal other, more severe issues. Irritation may be made worse by excessive scratching. In these cases, treating the cause of the itch may resolve accompanying symptoms. Itchy ankles may cause rashes or lesions. Or, itchiness may be a result of these issues. When itchy ankles are not associated with rashes or lesions, the condition is called essential pruritus. These cases are often characterized by rapid onset of symptoms and interference with daily activities. It is important to discover the cause of itchy ankles. When in doubt, or when the itch lasts longer than a few days, a person should seek medical attention. They are often accompanied by a rash or other irritations. It is not always possible to prevent the itchy feeling. Most people can find relief, using topical anti-itch cream. Allergic reactions and skin conditions are common causes of itchy ankles. There are several underlying causes of itchy ankles. These range in severity from simple allergic reactions to much more serious concerns that require medical treatment. Some of the most common causes of itchy ankles are: The most common symptom of contact dermatitis is an itchy red rash. However, it may also appear with symptoms such as: Treatment for contact dermatitis typically involves identifying the cause and avoiding future contact. Over-the-counter creams alone may provide itch relief. Hives are a common type of rash, characterized by the appearance of raised, swollen welts. They are often the result of: Hives may be caused by an allergic reaction. It is often a good idea to seek medical attention, to ensure that this reaction is not c Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

Type 2 Diabetes And Skin Health

What Is Type 2 Diabetes? Skin problems are often the first visible signs of diabetes, according to the American Diabetes Association. Type 2 diabetes can make existing skin problems worse, and also cause new ones. Type 2 diabetes is a chronic metabolic condition that affects how your body absorbs glucose (sugar). This happens when the body either rejects insulin or doesn’t produce enough insulin to maintain a normal blood sugar level. While it’s most common in adults, some children and adolescents can be diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. According to the Mayo Clinic, risk factors include being overweight, having a family history of diabetes, and inactivity. While there is no cure, patients can manage their type 2 diabetes by eating well, exercising, and (in some cases) taking medications recommended by your doctor. Monitoring your blood sugar is also important. Sometimes even maintaining a healthy weight isn’t enough to manage this condition. In some cases, your doctor will determine that medication intervention is needed. Common treatments for type 2 diabetes include: insulin therapy (insulin “shots,” usually reserved for those who don’t do well with oral medications) sulfonylureas (medications that stimulate your pancreas to secrete more insulin) metformin (widely prescribed drug which increases the body’s sensitivity to insulin) DPP-4 inhibitors (medications which reduce blood sugar levels) Causes of Diabetes-Related Skin Problems Long-term type 2 diabetes with hyperglycemia (high blood glucose) tends to reduce blood flow to the skin. It can also cause damage to blood vessels and nerves. Decreased blood circulation can lead to changes in the skin’s collagen. This changes the skin’s texture, appearance, and ability to heal. Damage to the skin cells can Continue reading >>

Discoloration Of Ankles?

Discoloration Of Ankles?

Diabetes Forum The Global Diabetes Community This site uses cookies. By continuing to use this site, you are agreeing to our use of cookies. Learn More. Get the Diabetes Forum App for your phone - available on iOS and Android . Find support, ask questions and share your experiences. Join the community Anyone Else have like a bruised look to their Ankles? I have had diebetes for a little over a year and have not done the best of managing it... and I really want to get on the road to geting it managed... JUst wondering if others have seen ankle discoloration, like a dark brown. Bruised look... If I get my diebestes managed can this be reversed or is this permanent now? Difficult to say if its related to your diabetes, I've certainly not experienced this but that's not to say the two aren't linked, if its cause of concern then let your gp have a look at your ankles, but certainly getting our diabetes under control will improve your overall health. Anyone Else have like a bruised look to their Ankles? I have had diebetes for a little over a year and have not done the best of managing it... and I really want to get on the road to geting it managed... JUst wondering if others have seen ankle discoloration, like a dark brown. Bruised look... If I get my diebestes managed can this be reversed or is this permanent now? Been there, done it, bought the t shirt. Hi mslaone and yes I've had exactly what you described. Mine was just forward of my ankle bone on the outside of my right foot. It was about 2 " across and looked like a big bruise. Used to itch like mad. I had this before I was diagnosed in November but i probably had Diabetes long before I was diagnosed so this could have been something to do with it. I used to rub E45 onto it to keep it moist otherwise it went dry and f Continue reading >>

I'm Overweight And A Diabetic Male. There Is A Darkness Around The Bottom Of My Legs, The Darkness Is On My Skin And My Skin Is Dry,what Could This Be? I Think It Has Something To Do With My Diabetes. | Zocdoc Answers

I'm Overweight And A Diabetic Male. There Is A Darkness Around The Bottom Of My Legs, The Darkness Is On My Skin And My Skin Is Dry,what Could This Be? I Think It Has Something To Do With My Diabetes. | Zocdoc Answers

Medical questions & health advice by board certified doctors "I'm overweight and a diabetic male. There is a darkness around the bottom of my legs, the darkness is on my skin and my skin is dry,what could this be? I think it has something to do with my diabetes." Zocdoc Answers I'm overweight and a diabetic male. There is a darkness around the bottom of my legs, the darkness is on my skin and my skin is dry,what could this be? I think it has something to do with my diabetes. I'm 29yrs old, male and I've had diabetes for 8yrs now. The darkness around the bottom of my legs has been a problem for 5yrs, the medications I take are Metformin, Glipize, and Actos. My legs don't hurt, though,and I haven't done anything about it yet. Darkness of the skin is an unusual situation. That being said, there is one likely cause of this that should be investigated. I would recommend that you see your primary care physician in order to evaluate this. In addition, diabetes requires careful attention (as I am sure you are aware).Firstly, keep in mind diabetes requires significant medial attention as it is a major disease that causes significant problems. You should be seeing a primary care doctor, an ophthalmologist and a podiatrist. The last two are very important to ensure there are no eye problems or foot problems that develop.Diabetes can cause darkness of the skin known as acanthosis nigrans. This is a darkening of the skin secondary to insulin resistance. It often has a velvety appearance. Common areas include back of the neck and underarms, but the leg is certainly a possible location. This indicates severe diabetes.Other causes of leg discoloration can include venous stasis (or weakening of the veins). There can also be changes that are caused by chronic fluid accumulation of the l Continue reading >>

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Diabetic Skin Problems And Diabetes Rash [and How To Treat Them]

Skin complications in diabetic patients are extremely common. They may even be the primary reason for the diagnosis determination. About 33% of diabetics will have skin changes caused or complicated by diabetes during their lives. Some of these changes may occur in people who are not affected by diabetes but are much more common in those with diabetes mellitus. Such conditions provoke itching, fungal and bacterial infections. There are other characteristic conditions of diabetes only. Typical skin changes for diabetes patients Diabetic dermatopathy The condition is also known as “shin spots”. Diabetic dermatopathy is the most common skin pathology in diabetes mellitus and is considered to be a pathologic sign of diabetes. It is presented with small round or oval brown spots on the skin, which are very similar to the age spots. Usually, they are found on the front surface of the legs, the affected areas are often asymmetrical. These spots do not cause itching or pain. Generally, they do not require therapy. They are due to changes in the small blood vessels of the skin – diabetic microangiopathy. It is a skin disease that is often, but not always, associated with diabetes mellitus. Due to the strong relationship between diabetes and this particular disease, many studies have focused on diabetic microangiopathy as the leading etiological factor. Clinically, necrobiosis lipoid is characterized by one or several soft yellowish-brown plaques that slowly develop in the anterior surface of the lower legs for several months. They can continue to exist for years. Some patients also have lesions on the chest, upper limbs and torso. The lesion begins as brown-red or body-colored papules that slowly develop into a “wax” plaque of varying size. The slightly raised border r Continue reading >>

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes: 12 Warning Signs That Appear On Your Skin

Diabetes can affect many parts of your body, including your skin. When diabetes affects the skin, it’s often a sign that your blood sugar (glucose) levels are too high. This could mean that: You have undiagnosed diabetes, or pre-diabetes Your treatment for diabetes needs to be adjusted If you notice any of the following warning signs on your skin, it’s time to talk with your doctor. This skin condition often begins as small raised solid bumps that look like pimples. As it progresses, these bumps turn into patches of swollen and hard skin. The patches can be yellow, reddish, or brown. You may also notice: The surrounding skin has a shiny porcelain-like appearance You can see blood vessels The skin is itchy and painful The skin disease goes through cycles where it is active, inactive, and then active again The medical name for this condition is necrobiosis lipodica (neck-row-by-oh-sis lee-poi-dee-ka). TAKE ACTION Get tested for diabetes if you have not been diagnosed. Work with your doctor to better control your diabetes. See a dermatologist about your skin. Necorbiosis lipodica is harmless, but it can lead to complications. A dark patch (or band) of velvety skin on the back of your neck, armpit, groin, or elsewhere could mean that you have too much insulin in your blood. AN is often a sign of prediabetes. The medical name for this skin condition is acanthosis nigricans (ay-can-THOE-sis NIE-gri-cans). TAKE ACTION: Get tested for diabetes. 3. Hard, thickening skin When this develops on the fingers, toes, or both, the medical name for this condition is digital sclerosis (sclear-row-sis). On the hands, you’ll notice tight, waxy skin on the backs of your hands. The fingers can become stiff and difficult to move. If diabetes has been poorly controlled for years, it can f Continue reading >>

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Skin Conditions And Diabetes: What You Need To Know

Everyone knows about the major long- and short-term complications of diabetes. But what many newly-diagnosed patients might not realize, is that skin conditions often come with having diabetes. My first exposure to skin conditions was a fungal infection. I can remember saying to the trainer that I could not have a fungal infection because my A1c was 6%. A specific over-the-counter anti-fungal ointment stopped the fungal infection process, and now I travel with this small tube just in case. I use it in the summer when I'm in the water and I develop itchy skin on my upper shoulder always in the same place. It's gone, and I'm happy. First, we want you to know that people who do not have diabetes get these skin conditions also, but as with many other complications, we tend to get them more often. About one-third of people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time. In fact, doctors report noting the presence of skin disorders before they diagnose diabetes. Second, if you think you have one of the skin conditions outlined in this article, please see your physician right away. Don't wait. Finally, we end this article with some easy ways to protect your skin when you have diabetes (either type 1 diabetes or type 2 diabetes). Skin Conditions that Can Affect People with Diabetes Bacterial Infections: People with diabetes appear to suffer more bacterial infections than the general population. There are several kinds of infections that can affect those of us with diabetes. One is a sty, which is an infection of the glands of the eyelids. A second type is a boil, which are infections of the hair follicles. Carbuncles are deep infections of the skin and the tissue underneath. Infections can also occur around the nails. We all know bacterial i Continue reading >>

What Causes Discoloration And Swelling In The Legs Of Diabetics?

What Causes Discoloration And Swelling In The Legs Of Diabetics?

If the swelling and discoloration looks like this: Then you're probably thinking of the stasis dermatitis associated with chronic venous insufficiency (CVI). In this disease, the valves in the veins stop working. These valves usually make sure that blood continues to move back to the heart. When they become incompetent, blood pools in the lower legs. The red blood cells sit around and eventually die. When they do, they release iron. The iron deposits in the skin and gives it the brown color. There seems to be a loose association between diabetes and CVI (Elsevier). I'm not convinced that diabetes causes this discoloration--more likely that those with diabetes may also have CVI for a host of other reasons (advancing age, increased weight, male). On the other hand, you could be talking about necrobiosis lipoidica, which is associated with diabetes: Only this doesn't come with swelling. It's more defined by atrophy--the skin actually gets thinner over these lesions. Continue reading >>

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes: Skin Conditions

Diabetes can affect every part of the body, including the skin. Many people with diabetes will have a skin disorder caused or affected by diabetes at some time in their lives. In some cases, skin problems can be the first sign that a person has diabetes. In some cases, people with diabetes develop skin conditions that can affect anyone. Examples of these conditions include bacterial infections, fungal infections, and itching. However, people with diabetes also are more prone to getting certain conditions. These include diabetic dermopathy, necrobiosis lipoidica diabeticorum, and eruptive xanthomatosis. Some common skin conditions in people with diabetes: Acanthosis nigricans This is a condition that results in the darkening and thickening of the skin. Often, areas of tan or brown skin, sometimes slightly raised, appear on the sides of the neck, the armpits, and groin. Occasionally, these darkened areas might appear on the hands, elbows, and knees. Acanthosis nigricans can affect otherwise healthy people, or it can be associated with certain medical conditions. It is frequently found in people with diabetes. Allergic reactions Allergic reactions to foods, bug bites, and medicines can cause rashes, depressions or bumps on the skin. If you think you might be having an allergic reaction to a medicine, contact your health care provider. Severe allergic reactions might require emergency treatment. It is especially important for people with diabetes to check for rashes or bumps in the areas where they inject their insulin. Atherosclerosis Atherosclerosis is the narrowing of blood vessels thickening of the vessel walls. While atherosclerosis most often is associated with blood vessels in or near the heart, it can affect blood vessels throughout the body, including those that su Continue reading >>

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