diabetestalk.net

Animas Insulin Pump Problems

Important Safety Information

Important Safety Information

Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and CGM System Intended Use of System The Animas® Vibe® System consists of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump paired with the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump is indicated for continuous subcutaneous insulin infusion for the management of insulin-requiring diabetes. It can be used solely for continuous insulin delivery and as part of the Animas® Vibe® System to receive and display continuous glucose measurements from the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The Animas® Vibe® System’s continuous glucose monitoring (CGM) is indicated for detecting trends and tracking patterns in persons (age 2 and older) with diabetes, and is intended to complement, not replace, information obtained from standard home glucose monitoring devices. CGM aids in the detection of episodes of hyperglycemia and hypoglycemia, facilitating both acute and long-term therapy adjustments, which may minimize these excursions. Interpretation of results from the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter should be based on the trends and patterns seen with several sequential readings over time. The System is intended for single patient use and requires a prescription. Pediatric Use (2-17 years old) Consider the following for pediatric use of the Animas® Vibe® System. Refer to the Caregiver Warnings in the “Before You Begin” section of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump & CGM System Owner’s Booklet for more information. Description of System The Animas® Vibe® System consists of the Animas® Vibe® Insulin Pump and the Dexcom G4® PLATINUM Sensor and Transmitter. The pump is used to deliver insulin continuously throughout the day (basal insulin), and to deliver a single amount (bolus insulin) at meal times to co Continue reading >>

Pump Problems, People Problems

Pump Problems, People Problems

For many people with diabetes, insulin pumps are an essential tool — offering better blood glucose control, more flexibility in the timing of meals and exercise, and greater independence from syringes, vials, and pens. But insulin pumps also carry risks, such as the potential for an infusion set to fall out or for the pump to malfunction, delivering too much or too little insulin. As the popularity of insulin pumps has grown, so has the incidence of such “adverse events.” According to an article from HealthDay, since 2006, 12,093 injuries and 310 deaths associated with insulin pumps have been reported to the US Food and Drug Administration (FDA). This, combined with 4,294 reported pump malfunctions and several recalls of pumps, prompted the FDA to convene an advisory panel of outside medical experts to make recommendations for how to deal with the issue. The panel concluded that the FDA should require pump manufacturers to provide more detailed information on adverse events. Currently, according to the panel, manufacturers often do not mention what specific pump difficulty occurred in the adverse events they report, and they even frequently give incomplete information about deaths associated with their pumps. Thus, the reason for most of these deaths remains unknown. By requiring manufacturers to be more detailed in their reporting, the panel hopes, both manufacturers and the FDA will have more information to figure out — and solve — potential pump problems. If you use a pump, have you ever felt in danger because of a mistake or malfunction? Do you think pumps are more dangerous than traditional insulin injections? Can you think of any tips — for manufacturers, health-care providers, or pump users — that might reduce the likelihood of mistakes? How much sh Continue reading >>

Animas Issues Warning For Onetouch Ping Insulin Pump Users

Animas Issues Warning For Onetouch Ping Insulin Pump Users

Yesterday, Animas Corporation, a subsidiary company of Johnson & Johnson, issued a very important warning for those who use their OneTouch Ping insulin pump device. The Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump’s most sellable features is the ability the ability to “talk” with a remote controller through radio frequency. This ability allows the user to see insulin pump data as well as deliver bolus doses without needing to touch the insulin pump itself. There are limitations, however, in that the user does need to keep the two devices within 5-8 feet of each other throughout the entire bolus for it to go through, otherwise an incomplete bolus alert will sound (although it can reach up to 10 meters). The meter remote also cannot make changes to settings or basal rates, including set temporary basal rates. The Warning The warning stated “a person could potentially gain unauthorized access to the pump through its unencrypted radio frequency communication system.” If successful, the hacker could then program a bolus into the pump without the users knowledge and deliver it. However: they have done their investigations into the matter and the risk of this happening is very low. As stated, the hacker and user would need to be within a defined range through the entire time it would take to deliver the bolus. Also, the device is not connected wirelessly to any sort of internet or cellular data connection, and there are multiple safeguards in place to prevent highly knowledgeable hackers from getting into the system. What YOU can do: There are a few things that you can do to if you use the pump but would rather have greater safety of mind. Since the pump is fully operational without the meter remote, the user can disable the RF antenna in the pump and manually input blood gluco Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe Insulin Pump And Blood Glucose Analyser - Ongoing Issues With Screen Fade, Cracked Battery Casing And Other Issues

Animas Vibe Insulin Pump And Blood Glucose Analyser - Ongoing Issues With Screen Fade, Cracked Battery Casing And Other Issues

Early Warning System - Monitoring Communication Medsafe emphasises that patients should NOT stop using any medicine or medical device subject to a monitoring communication. If you have any concerns with a medicine or medical device you are using, please contact your health professional. A monitoring communication does not mean that the medicine or medical device causes an adverse event. Animas Vibe Insulin Pump and Blood Glucose Analyser - ongoing issues with screen fade, cracked battery casing and other issues. Reports of issues with these devices have been received by Medsafe. The reports predominantly relate to issues with screen fade or cracked battery casing. Other issues have also been reported, such as frozen/ stiff pads or software problems affecting the retention of date and time. The Animas Vibe pump is funded by PHARMAC for use by insulin dependent patients in the community to manage their insulin requirements . The pump is connected to the patient twenty four hours a day and as such is often exposed to a high degree of stress. The pump has a four year warranty and pumps are replaced when issues are notified. The sponsor also provides technical support direct to patients. Medsafe is continuing to monitor reports relating to this device . Consumers and healthcare professionals are encouraged to report problems with this product to Medsafe. When reporting an event relating to this type of device, Medsafe requests that the reporter be specific about the issues experienced with the device and the consequences/ outcome, if any. Medsafe cannot give advice about an individuals medical condition. If you have any concerns about a medicine you are taking Medsafe encourages you to talk to your healthcare professional. Continue reading >>

What To Do If Your Insulin Pump Malfunctions

What To Do If Your Insulin Pump Malfunctions

There's nothing quite like the horror of having an insulin pump suddenly go postal at eleven o'clock on a Saturday night. The buttons that don't respond to touch, the motor that spins wildly, the shrieking alarms. It's almost enough to induce a panic attack! Although insulin pumps are the treatment method of choice for both Amy and I, they are machines. Which means that sometimes they go kaputt. Unlike Amy who rocks an Omnipod, I don't have a box of back-ups at my disposal to switch to. When a tubed insulin pump (Medtronic, Animas, or the dearly departed Cozmo) fails, it's a pretty straightforward fix, but not without its share of anxiety. Of course, according to Murphy's Law, an insulin pump will usually die at the most inconvenient moment. The last time my insulin pump died was in 2005 (knock on wood), while on vacation at a cabin in rural Central Oregon. I was changing my reservoir and in the middle of priming, my pump's motor suddenly didn't recognize how much insulin was coming out. After rewinding a couple of times and having half a reservoir of insulin spew all over the kitchen counter, I admitted defeat. So what's a PWD to do? Luckily, it was a Tuesday afternoon, and I was able to get a prescription for Lantus and syringes faxed to the local pharmacy within a couple of hours. But what if it were the weekend or what if my vacation was somewhere overseas? Animas and Medtronic both have fairly cut-and-dry recommendations for what you should do if your insulin pump suddenly becomes a very expensive paper weight: - First, call the manufacturer right away. They can usually overnight a replacement pump, so chances are you won't be without your pump for longer than 24 hours. - Always keep a prescription or a bottle of long-acting insulin handy (and bring it with you whe Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe Insulin Pumps

Animas Vibe Insulin Pumps

Australian Government Department of Health Safety advisory - potential battery issues if compartment cracked Consumers and health professionals are advised that Australasian Medical & Scientific Limited, in consultation with the TGA, is issuing a safety advisory regarding the Animas Vibe insulin pump due to the potential for battery compartment damage to affect the supply of power to the unit. Australasian Medical & Scientific Limited advises that the pump may lose its waterproof capability and/or the ability to maintain a reliable power connection between the battery and the battery contacts if the compartment is cracked. Cracking is most commonly caused if the pump is dropped or the battery compartment cap is over-tightened. In the event that the battery power is interrupted, the pump may not alert the patient of an issue through alarms. In addition, moisture in the pump can contribute to pump failure and the suspension of insulin delivery. Insulin pumps are used to automatically deliver the required doses of insulin in people with certain types of diabetes. If you or someone you provide care for uses an Animas Vibe insulin pump be alert to this issue. Australasian Medical & Scientific Limited advises pump users to regularly inspect their pump for cracks and replace the pump battery cap every six months. If you drop your pump or hit it against something hard, inspect it to be sure it is still working properly. When you inspect the battery cap ensure the coloured O-ring is not damaged and that the small air hole in the centre of the cap is not blocked. Do not use excessive force to tighten the cap. The owner's booklet provides further information about what to look for and how to keep the pump well maintained. Patients are advised to contact Australasian Medical & Sci Continue reading >>

R7-2016-07: Multiple Vulnerabilities In Animas Onetouch Ping Insulin Pump

R7-2016-07: Multiple Vulnerabilities In Animas Onetouch Ping Insulin Pump

Today we are announcing three vulnerabilities in the Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump system, a popular pump with a blood glucose meter that services as a remote control via RF communication. Before we get into the technical details, we want to flag that we believe the risk of wide scale exploitation of these insulin pump vulnerabilities is relatively low, and we don't believe this is cause for panic. We recommend that users of the devices consult their healthcare providers before making major decisions regarding the use of these devices. More on that further down in this post. Users should also be receiving notification of this issue, along with details for mitigating it, directly from Animas Corporation, via physical mail. We recommend you pay close attention to this communication. Product description The OneTouch Ping is a popular medical device used by diabetic patients to self-administer insulin. According to the vendor's website, it is a "two-part system" that "communicates wirelessly to deliver insulin." The two devices communicate in the 900mhz band using a proprietary management protocol. Summary of findings The OneTouch Ping insulin pump system uses cleartext communications rather than encrypted communications, in its proprietary wireless management protocol. Due to this lack of encryption, Rapid7 researcher Jay Radcliffe discovered that a remote attacker can spoof the Meter Remote and trigger unauthorized insulin injections. Due to these insulin vulnerabilities, an adversary within sufficient proximity (which can depend on the radio transmission equipment being used) can remotely harm users of the system and potentially cause them to have hypoglycemic reaction, if he or she does not cancel the insulin delivery on the pump. These issues have been reported to Continue reading >>

Customers In Countries Outside U.s. And Canada

Customers In Countries Outside U.s. And Canada

Animas Corporation intends to exit the insulin pump business and discontinue the manufacturing and sale of Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps. This decision was extremely difficult and comes following an extensive exploration of all viable other options for the Animas business. We have selected Medtronic as our partner-of-choice to facilitate a seamless insulin delivery system transition period. One of the reasons we chose Medtronic as our partner-of-choice is because of its strong track record providing outstanding patient care and support. For over 30 years, Medtronic has been a global leader in the treatment of those living with diabetes, and we are confident that they will provide outstanding support to our patients and their care teams. If you are currently using an Animas pump and pump supplies, you will continue to receive pump support and services. Specifically, Animas will continue to provide customer service and warranty support, including providing pump supplies that are used in conjunction with the Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps, through a transition period. As part of our continued commitment to patient care, Animas will honor pump warranties. We recognize that patients living with diabetes rely on our products to provide critical care, and we want to reassure patients and their care teams that we will be there, every step of the way, throughout this process. For patients, caregivers and healthcare providers in the U.S. and Canada, this announcement means: Animas has discontinued the sale of all Animas® Vibe® and OneTouch Ping® insulin pumps effective immediately. If you are on a pump with a warranty that expires on or after September 30, 2019, you or your pump supplier will be contacted by a member of the Medtronic tran Continue reading >>

Insulin Pump Problems And Troubleshooting

Insulin Pump Problems And Troubleshooting

Tweet Whilst insulin pumps give us more power to bring our blood glucose levels under control, there are a number of common problems which can occur from time to time. Some of the problems can be prevented to some degree and insulin pumpers (insulin pump users) are always looking for ways to better cope with life on an insulin pump. Bubbles in insulin pumps Bubbles can form in the reservoir or tubing of occur for a number of reasons not priming air out of the reservoir when refilling the reservoir/using an new cartridge not priming all the air out of the tubing when changing to a new infusion set having a loose connection at either of the tubing using insulin straight from the fridge – this can cause bubble to form as the insulin warms up to room temperature If your insulin pump delivers bubbles, it means you won’t be getting the full insulin dose you intended which can lead to higher than normal blood glucose levels and could lead to a rise in ketone levels. How you deal with bubbles may vary from pump to pump. Taking care to prime out air from the reservoir and tubing, ensuring all connections are tight and using insulin that is at room temperature before using in your insulin pump can help to reduce the likelihood of high blood sugar levels as a result of bubbles. Related threads on the Diabetes Forum: Bubbles in cartridge/infusion set Accuchek air bubbles nightmare!! Air bubbles in tube Occlusions An occlusion is the name for any blockage that prevents your pump from delivering insulin properly. Some pumps may signal an alarm if it notices an occlusion has occurred. Occlusions may occur for any of the following reasons: If pressure is being applied to the tubing or the infusion site If the cannula has been bent during insertion – which may be more common with Continue reading >>

Animas Vibe And Problems With Water

Animas Vibe And Problems With Water

Long time lurker, first time poster. I'm 23, diagnosed with Type 1 at 13, and have worn some form of Animas Pump (20/20, Ping, and Vibe) for the last 9 years. The pump is advertised as being waterproof at 12 feet for 24 hours, which is something I really like. I used to be an avid swimmer and also just enjoy hanging out at the pool, so this has always been advantageous for me because I don't have to worry about disconnecting or anything. Today, I went to the beach with a friend of mine. Kept my pump on because I wasn't sure how long we'd be in the water. We ended up wading around in the ocean for about 20-30 minutes. Pump was never submerged more than maybe 2 feet. Despite this, I got out of the water today and the screen was completely flooded. No longer working. I've got Animas sending me a new pump and am on syringes again temporarily, but I was wondering if anyone else had encountered this type of problem before? It is definitely concerning, and has me wondering if I should shop around for some new options. Continue reading >>

J&j Warns Diabetic Patients: Insulin Pump Vulnerable To Hacking

J&j Warns Diabetic Patients: Insulin Pump Vulnerable To Hacking

J&J warns diabetic patients: Insulin pump vulnerable to hacking (Reuters) - Johnson & Johnson is telling patients that it has learned of a security vulnerability in one of its insulin pumps that a hacker could exploit to overdose diabetic patients with insulin, though it describes the risk as low. Medical device experts said they believe it was the first time a manufacturer had issued such a warning to patients about a cyber vulnerability, a hot topic in the industry following revelations last month about possible bugs in pacemakers and defibrillators. J&J executives told Reuters they knew of no examples of attempted hacking attacks on the device, the J&J Animas OneTouch Ping insulin pump. The company is nonetheless warning customers and providing advice on how to fix the problem. The probability of unauthorized access to the OneTouch Ping system is extremely low, the company said in letters sent on Monday to doctors and about 114,000 patients who use the device in the United States and Canada. It would require technical expertise, sophisticated equipment and proximity to the pump, as the OneTouch Ping system is not connected to the internet or to any external network. A copy of the text of the letter was made available to Reuters. Insulin pumps are medical devices that patients attach to their bodies that injects insulin through catheters. The Animas OneTouch Ping, which was launched in 2008, is sold with a wireless remote control that patients can use to order the pump to dose insulin so that they do not need access to the device itself, which is typically worn under clothing and can be awkward to reach. Jay Radcliffe, a diabetic and researcher with cyber security firm Rapid7 Inc, said he had identified ways for a hacker to spoof communications between the remote con Continue reading >>

One Touch Ping Insulin Pump Problems Not Properly Reported By J&j

One Touch Ping Insulin Pump Problems Not Properly Reported By J&j

One Touch Ping Insulin Pump Problems Not Properly Reported by J&J Federal regulators are accusing a subsidiary of Johnson & Johnson of failing to warn consumers about known problems with One Touch Ping insulin pumps , which were not properly reported or addressed. The FDA sent a warning letter to Animas Corporation late last month, indicating that the company failed to report within 30 days three serious injuries that were possibly caused by defective Animas insulin pumps . The patients suffered high blood sugar, diabetic ketoacidosis, respiratory problems and coma due to a lack of insulin believed to be caused by problems with the pumps. Companies are required to report problems with devices they manufacture that could cause serious injury or death within 30 days. Two of the incidents were not reported by Animas within that time frame and one was never reported at all. The company had 15 days from receiving the letter on December 27 to respond to the allegations that it failed to properly report the incidents. The One Touch Ping insulin pump problems appears to be related to the keypads of the device. The incidents may have been caused by either defective keypads that had deteriorated, or patient confusion and error, which still points to a problem with the pumps, because their design should prevent such errors. However, the FDA does not appear to seek an insulin pump recall at this time. It appears, according to the FDAs investigation, that the company realized there was a problem with the keypad, but continued to sell it while shopping for a new keypad manufacturer. Only after it found a replacement for the defective keypads did it alert consumers and the FDA that there was a problem. Company officials have suggested that they did not see the keypad issues as a thre Continue reading >>

Animas Insulin Pump Users

Animas Insulin Pump Users

I'm looking at getting a new pump. I've been using the same MM 511 for 6 years now. The buttons are starting to have issues so I've got to buy a new one. I'm really considering the Animas and wanted to hear from people that have used it. What do you like/don't like etc? Overall opinions and real life examples would be great! My 7 year old daughter uses one, and we have no complaints about it. We have a 4 year old 1250 with a black and white screen. The only think I wish was better was the screen, and the newer screens are much better. I recommend Animas 100% if you get one with a newer screen. D.D. Family T1 since 1982, pumping with Animas on 10/20/08 I've been pumping with Animas for a month now with the 2020. Seeing as you live in the US you can get the Ping which is a meter/remote for the 2020 as well. Animas comes in lots of cool colours that are awsome and the screen is large and bright. It is kind of idiot proof, I love that! It reminds you when you've forgotton to do a step, it totally walks you through things. I love my rep and my customer care team, they are all awsome people and good to talk to. I like the fact that for my pump I can customize my food data base to the things that I eat and enjoy. I like the insets that Animas use they are very easy to insert and are very comfortable. I never tried the medtronic ones but had tried another companies and it wasn't as comfortable. OH another good feature is that it is electostatic resistant ( I think that is what it is called ) and is water proof. All around a good sturdy pump. If you have any other questions just PM me. It is a totally personnal choice. Regardless of what pump you choose you may or may not have problems with the pump or insets. I think you need to look at options that the pump has to offer as we Continue reading >>

Animas Onetouch Ping - Issues You Should Know About Before Buying

Animas Onetouch Ping - Issues You Should Know About Before Buying

IF YOU ARE CONSIDERING AN ANIMAS ONE-TOUCH PING PUMP - DO NOT BUY, EVER! - My 13yr old son has had his one-touch ping pump for less than 2 years and we have gone through 3 of the "low-profile" belt clips and now I need to buy another one (@ $20 to $30 each). With normal wear they last about 4 to 6 months and then fall apart, but not before becoming loose at the screw. They are purposefully designed with a screw type that cannot be tightened. The clip has a 90 day warranty and that's about the time they start becoming loose and then you have about a month or so before it falls aparts competely. Every call to Animas support, every time, leads to a person who can do nothing about the issue. They know about it but refuse to do anything about it. Every customer service rep just sits in silence when you ask what are they going to do to provide customer satisfaction. Their customer service is non-existant. I've called countless times to know it's not an isolated issue with one rep. According to insurance, we have two years left on this pump before we can switch to a competitor product. WARNING - NEVER BUY ANIMAS ONE-TOUCH PING PUMP. You have filled the Forum with your complaint against the Animas Ping, Mikey! Quite unfair as the pump works well and your complaint is about a $25 clip. The fact that a clip breaks frequently when used by your 13-year-old son and costs a pretty penny to replace is NO reason to tell people not to buy a brand of pump. And... there is no such thing as *normal wear* for a 13-year-old boy. I raised two of them. The pump itself has worked wonderfully for me for 5 years and I have had to replace the clip ONCE. I wear it at my jeans belt every single day and live and work on my farm doing all kinds of heavy and dirty work. I am very pleased with the Anim Continue reading >>

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Animas Corporation To Close Operations And Exit Insulin Pump Market

Animas Corporation to Close Operations and Exit Insulin Pump Market Company will work with Medtronic as a partner-of-choice to help ensure a smooth transition for patients on insulin pumps CHESTERBROOK, Pa., Oct. 5, 2017 /CNW/ --Animas Corporation, one of the Johnson & Johnson Diabetes Care Companies, today announced that it intends to discontinue the manufacturing and sale of Animas Vibe and OneTouch Ping insulin pumps, close operations and exit the insulin pump business. Animas has selected Medtronic plc (NYSE: MDT), a world leader in diabetes, as its partner-of-choice to facilitate a seamless transition for patients, caregivers and healthcare providers. Patients using an Animas insulin pump will be offered the option to transfer to a Medtronic pump. Patient safety and continuity of care is of utmost importance and Animas will continue to provide customer service, training and warranty support, including providing pump supplies that are used in conjunction with the Animas Vibe and OneTouch Ping insulin pumps, through a transition period. "We recognize that patients living with diabetes rely on our products to provide critical care, and we want to reassure them that we will be with them every step of the way throughout this transition," said Valerie Asbury, General Manager of Animas Corporation. "Our number one priority is ensuring patients have a seamless experience as they transition to Medtronic. For over 30 years, Medtronic has been a global leader in the treatment of those living with diabetes, and we are confident they will provide outstanding support to our patients and their healthcare teams." "We are incredibly grateful to our patients and healthcare partners for the trust, confidence and loyalty they have placed in Animas products over the last 12 years," As Continue reading >>

More in diabetes