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Anger Causes Diabetes

Could Suppressed Emotions Be The Root Cause For Diabetes?

Could Suppressed Emotions Be The Root Cause For Diabetes?

/ Could suppressed emotions be the root cause for diabetes? Could suppressed emotions be the root cause for diabetes? We all think diabetes is a condition brought about by high levels of sugar, here is an understanding of how emotions could be the cause for diabetes. Anu Mehta | Updated: November 17, 2014 12:40 pm Tags: World Diabetes Day World Diabetes Day 2014 We all often think that diabetes is a condition that is brought about by the rise of blood sugar levels in our body. But did you know that your emotions play a large role in mitigating the start and progression of this condition? Yes, according to META-Health, supressed emotions and trauma locked inside our subconscious memory are leading causes for the onset of diabetes. In this post Anu Mehta, META-Health master tells you about why you could be suffering from the condition and what you can do to reverse it. What is META-Health and how can it help a diabetic patient? META-Health is a diagnostic tool that helps us to identify the root cause of a health disorder. It does not diagnose the health issue, as conventional medicine does but finds out the emotional and biological cause of the health issues. The stressful events that happen in anyone life, are sudden, unexpected, dramatic and leave us feeling lonely; oftenwe do not know how to deal with them. These events get stored in our subconscious mind and have an impact on our brain, mind, body, and psyche. Our behavior completely changes after the stressful event. If we sort the emotional conflict, behind the disease, we can deal with any disease. An individual comes to a META-Health practitioner with proper diagnosis from the doctor saying he has diabetes. After this the META-Health practitioner will find out which traumatic event hascaused the conflict . He wil Continue reading >>

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

Domestic Violence, Anger, And Diabetes

By Debra Manzella, RN | Reviewed by a board-certified physician You may be wondering if anger is a normal part of dealing with diabetes. Is it normal for someone with type 1 diabetes to erupt into violent anger and take it out on his or her partner? Frustration and anger are often experienced by people who deal with chronic illnesses like diabetes. Fluctuating blood glucose levels can also contribute to mood swings and cause people to exhibit angry behavior. But when does that kind of anger cross the line into domestic abuse? Anger and frustration can be common reactions when someone has a chronic disease like diabetes . It's a lot to cope with, and at times it may really be upsetting to have to deal with diabetes day after day for a lifetime. Plus, physiologically, when someone's blood sugar fluctuates, spikes, or drops, it can produce feelings of anger, anxiety, or depression that are really out of the control of the person experiencing them. Your partner's diabetes may make it easier for you to overlook or make excuses for angry reactions , which is okay to an extent. However, anger that escalates into physical, verbal, or emotional abuse is not a normal reaction. Every person has a right to get angry sometimes, but if that anger is expressed violently to hurt or scare you, then it becomes domestic abuse. Learn which foods to enjoy and avoidand start feeling great! Abuse can be actual physical contact, like hitting, slapping, pushing, or otherwise inflicting bodily harm, but it can also be threatening, belittling, or making you feel intimidated or scared. What to Do If You're Struggling With Diabetes and Anger If you have diabetes and anger is a problem for you, whether it's because you're angry that you have the condition or because you have frequent blood sugar fl Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes And Mood Swings: Effects On Relationships

Diabetes is a condition that impacts the way a person's body uses sugar for energy. However, diabetes affects much more than blood sugar. It can impact nearly every body system and have an effect on a person's mood. Stress associated with managing diabetes as well as concerns about potential side effects can all contribute to changes in mood. In addition, the actual highs and lows of blood sugar levels may also cause nervousness, anxiety, and confusion. It is important for people to recognize their own individual symptoms of high or low blood sugar. They must also ensure they seek support for any concerning mental health symptoms they might experience. Watching these mood swings can often be difficult for friends and family to understand. However, learning why a person may experience mood changes related to diabetes and being supportive can help to promote a stronger, healthier relationship. Contents of this article: How do diabetes and mood swings go together? Diabetes can have many effects on a person's mood. For example, managing diabetes can be stressful. A person may be constantly worried about their blood sugar and whether it is too high or too low. Adjustments to their diet and constantly checking their blood sugar can also add to a person's stress and enjoyment of life. As a result, they are more likely to experience feelings of anxiety and depression. Blood sugar swings can cause rapid changes in a person's mood, such as making them sad and irritable. This is especially true during hypoglycemic episodes, where blood sugar levels dip lower than 70 milligrams per deciliter (mg/dL). Hyperglycemic episodes where levels spike higher than 250 mg/dL may cause confusion in people with type 1 diabetes, but are much less likely to in those with type 2 diabetes. When a pe Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Are People With Diabetes More Prone To Aggression?

Relationship Between Blood Glucose Level and Self-Control Blood sugar can make people do crazy things. According to a recent scientific study on the link between low blood glucose level and relationship clashes (Bushman et al, 2014), being hungry makes an individual generally cranky and act more hostile to others. In the study, couples who are hungry tend to have a much higher tendency to exhibit aggression towards each other and become more impulsive in their reactions. This phenomenon is often referred to “hangry” (meaning feeling angry when you are hungry). If this irritable state can happen to any healthy person who experiences a change in their blood glucose level, imagine the ordeals individuals with diabetes frequently go through on a daily basis. However, do not jump to the conclusion that diabetes leads to aggression. In fact, scientists find a more direct correlation between blood glucose level and self-control. I recommend reading the following articles: In a way, you can visualize self-control as a muscle that requires a lot of energy to sustain so that it does not become ineffective quickly. This energy source comes from the glucose in the blood. So what kind of activities can wear out this “muscle”? Any daily activities that require self-discipline such as forcing yourself to get out of bed early to exercise, resisting from having a soda drink or another cookie with your meal, stopping yourself from smoking, dealing with stressful situations at work and at home, and abstaining yourself from road rage. As you can see, self-control plays a crucial part in restraining inappropriate and aggressive behaviors. So when people are low in glucose, the self-control mechanism cannot function properly to prevent these outbursts of hostile actions. In a researc Continue reading >>

Does Emotional Stress Cause Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus? A Review From The European Depression In Diabetes (edid) Research Consortium.

Does Emotional Stress Cause Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus? A Review From The European Depression In Diabetes (edid) Research Consortium.

Abstract According to the World Health Organization, approximately 220 million people worldwide have type 2 diabetes mellitus. Patients with type 2 diabetes not only have a chronic disease to cope with, they are also at increased risk for coronary heart disease, peripheral vascular disease, retinopathy, nephropathy, and neuropathy. The exact causes of type 2 diabetes are still not clear. Since the 17th century, it has been suggested that emotional stress plays a role in the etiology of type 2 diabetes mellitus. So far, review studies have mainly focused on depression as a risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Yet, chronic emotional stress is an established risk factor for the development of depression. The present review provides an overview of mainly prospective epidemiological studies that have investigated the associations between different forms of emotional stress and the development of type 2 diabetes mellitus. Results of longitudinal studies suggest that not only depression but also general emotional stress and anxiety, sleeping problems, anger, and hostility are associated with an increased risk for the development of type 2 diabetes. Conflicting results were found regarding childhood neglect, life events, and work stress. It is important to emphasize that publication-bias may have occurred, resulting from "fishing-expeditions," where authors search their data for significant associations. Publication bias may also be caused by the tendency of reviewers and Editors to reject manuscripts with negative results for publication. It is therefore essential that research groups, who aim to conduct a new epidemiological cohort study, prospectively describe and publish the design of their study. Future research should focus on identifying mechanism Continue reading >>

Why Anger And Stewing Can Mess With Diabetes

Why Anger And Stewing Can Mess With Diabetes

It seems diabetes and anger may go hand-in-hand. Dealing with diabetes can make people feel angry and anger may result in blood sugar elevations. Discover why anger and stewing can mess with your diabetes. Anger Related to Diabetes From the initial diagnosis to ongoing self-management, some people are angry about having to deal with diabetes daily. Diabetes must be treated indefinitely since there is no specific cure. The goal is to maintain healthy blood sugar levels, blood pressure levels and cholesterol levels. This can be a challenge that makes people feel “angry at the disease” and the steps it takes to treat it. Their current lifestyle may need dramatic changes that require a lot of hard work, focus and time. Others feel threatened due to the potential complications and anger is a defense mechanism. It is important to learn how to recognize your anger and use it to help improve your diabetes care. Diabetes Care is Necessary Ongoing diabetes care is necessary to live a healthy life and help reduce the risk of related health problems. Anger can lead to failure to take proper care of your diabetes resulting in heightened blood sugars. Take time to determine what makes you angry and when you feel that way. Keep notes about your feelings and look for patterns. For example, if you get angry before going to parties because you need to avoid sugary, rich foods, discover new and healthier ones to substitute. Hopefully your angry feelings prior to social situations will dissipate when you have something positive to look forward to. This will ultimately help control your blood sugars. Figure Out What Fuels Your Anger Once you are angry, these feelings can become more intense until you are stewing for hours. Learn to look for the warning signs that your anger is getting d Continue reading >>

Can Anger Cause Diabetes?

Can Anger Cause Diabetes?

Ok so i have high cholesterol and my dad told me that i can get diabetes from high cholesterol by getting really angry. Can you get diabetes from getting angry while having high cholesterol? Update: Btw i don't have diabetes, well for now. Are you sure you want to delete this answer? Best Answer: No, you can get diabetes as a genetic problem or if your pancreas stops making or makes too little insulin. Source(s): Secret To Destroy Diabetes : Source(s): I Cured My Diabetes - Life style is often part of the issue. Life style changes now could delay or prevent you from getting diabetes later. Learn here What you eat is not actually the cause of diabetes, but how you live can be. If you sit on the couch all day, your chances of developing diabetes goes up greatly. Just do the best you can to not gain weight and to maintain an active life style and that will greatly help reduce some of your risks. Shocking New Diabetes Research Revealed - Heal Diabetes In Three Weeks : Not at all unusual. There's a definite grieving period with being diagnosed with a debilitating disease. He's pizzed. High and low blood sugar can also make a person very irritable. He's going to get a lot of wacky numbers while he finds the right balance of medication. Hes also been blindsided with a huge lifestyle change that isnt going to be any fun for him. He LIKES his salt, and potato chips and beer. Be supportive. The best thing you and your family can do for your dad is join him in his new lifestyle. Eat like he eats. Go for a walk WITH him. Hell really appreciate it. Yeah... Diabetes is from genetics not anger. I think this question violates the Community Guidelines Chat or rant, adult content, spam, insulting other members, show more I think this question violates the Terms of Service Harm to minors Continue reading >>

Can Diabetes Affect Your Mood?

Can Diabetes Affect Your Mood?

My husband has type 2 diabetes, which is now being controlled by medicine. I find that he is sometimes particularly irritable or even mean, which is very out of character for him. Is this common with type 2 diabetes, or with high or low readings? — Sally, Florida It is great that you are seeking a better understanding of your husband’s illness. Diabetes is a disease that not only affects individuals but also those close to them. As a result, those who have good family support in the care of their diabetes do much better in managing their illness. There are a few reasons for behavioral changes like those you see in your husband among people with diabetes. One is the effect of abnormally low glucose levels in the bloodstream. The other reason is depression, which can be triggered by the diagnosis of diabetes, the burden of daily management, and fear of complications. Low glucose levels can cause symptoms including impaired judgment, anxiety, moodiness, belligerence, fatigue, apathy, confusion, dizziness, blurred vision, and a lack of coordination. I would advise your husband to check his sugar levels at the times when he is irritable. If his mood is indeed due to low glucose levels, the symptoms will improve if he raises his blood sugar, for example, by drinking orange juice or taking glucose tablets. It is also important to consult with his doctor to adjust his medicines or dietary intake. On the other hand, your husband’s irritability can be a manifestation of depression. Many people with depression are undiagnosed and thus do not receive the necessary counseling and treatment. Also, depression symptoms vary from person to person, which can make it difficult to diagnose. Signs such as lack of sleep, overeating or lack of appetite, poor concentration, and other sym Continue reading >>

Are Diabetics Angry...?

Are Diabetics Angry...?

(See Also: Diabetes and Anger -- Is there a Deeper Connection?) This angry diabetic has been really bewildered for the past few weeks with many new and personal challenges... As we know, life's problems do not stop at diabetes, or any other chronic illness, nor do they care if we're having to juggle other things. In fact, in the storm of life... sometimes when it rains, it just pours. (I need to buy a raincoat.) So, I thought... why not take a little time to address a common, and often overlooked, issue with diabetes? Anger. In the past few weeks, my blog has registered many, many Google searches for "anger and diabetes," "do diabetics suffer from anger," "do diabetics need anger management," etc. I fear many of these folks might be family members really wanting to understand, and care for their loved ones... or maybe folks just wanting to understand themselves a little better. Before I get a little further into the discussion, I want to add that while the emotions we experience through the ups and downs of illness, and life, are perfectly normal... this blog post is in NO WAY a justification for aggression, violence, or abuse. It might be an EXPLANATION of a course of events, but in the end... we are responsible for our own selves, and how we manage our health, and our emotions. Got that? Okay... :) Diabetes is a PERVASIVE disease... Now, in order to make some of kind of sense of the emotions a person with diabetes might feel, we need to understand one thing: Diabetes is a PERVASIVE life change. It is one of the most pervasive life changes an 'afflicted' person will ever have to face. While it may not seem as such in the beginning stages (especially for type 2, and often during a "honeymoon phase" for a type 1), with time, an individual will soon become painfully aware Continue reading >>

Anger! (and Diabetes)

Anger! (and Diabetes)

I have no doubt that I’ve written about this before, and I’ll probably write about it again. I’ve been thinking about anger and diabetes this week. It seems to hit me in cycles, this feeling of, “Wait a minute, I’m angry about this!” I live my regular daily, diabetes-filled life without giving it a whole lot of thought, and then it seems to bubble up to the surface all at once. This week has been one of those weeks when it bubbles up. During these kinds of weeks, I’m reminded again of the emotional WEIGHT living with this chronic disease has on a person. Even writing those words, “chronic disease,” causes my emotional self to stir a little. Because diabetes is NOT just some simple condition that means we “can’t have sugar,” as the wider world tends to think. No, diabetes is a complex thing to manage; it has serious consequences for any failure to manage it; it demands time, thought, energy, and focus 24 hours a day, 7 days a week, 365 days a year; and even after all of that time and effort, it can STILL misbehave and infuriate us some days. What I’m saying is that managing diabetes is an INVOLVED process — we don’t just take a pill and forget about it. No, we have to build our lives AROUND it. And we have a right to be mad about that. Skillfully angry Anger is not a bad thing. In fact, anger is a perfectly normal, even positive, emotion in our arsenal of reactions. There are many times when a little anger is needed. We SHOULD feel anger when we see injustice; we SHOULD feel anger when we’ve been taken advantage of or attacked. Without any anger, we would all be doormats! So feeling anger is not a problem. What IS a problem is unskillful handling of anger, and that’s something all too common for us. You see, anger may not be an inherentl Continue reading >>

How Stress Hormones Raise Blood Sugar

How Stress Hormones Raise Blood Sugar

In this excerpt from “Think Like a Pancreas”, certified diabetes educator Gary Scheiner describes why this happens and what to do about it. (excerpted from Think Like A Pancreas: A Practical Guide to Managing Diabetes With Insulin by Gary Scheiner MS, CDE, DaCapo Press, 2011) Last weekend I decided to stay up late and watch a scary movie. It had something to do with super-gross vampires who get their jollies by eating the flesh of unsuspecting hotel guests. Anyway, after the final gut-wrenching, heart-pumping scene, I decided to check my blood sugar. I’ll be darned – it had risen about 200 mg/dL (11 mmol) during the movie. With blood that sweet, I felt like the grand prize for any vampires that might happen to be lurking in my neighborhood. As you may be aware, the liver serves as a storehouse for glucose, keeping it in a concentrated form called glycogen. The liver breaks down small amounts of glycogen all the time, releasing glucose into the bloodstream to nourish the brain, nerves, heart and other “always active” organs. The liver’s release of glucose depends largely on the presence of certain hormones. Of all the hormones in the body, only insulin causes the liver to take sugar out of the bloodstream and store it in the form of glycogen. All the other hormones—including stress hormones, sex hormones, growth hormones and glucagon—cause the liver to secrete glucose back into the bloodstream. Growth hormone is produced in a 24-hour cycle and is responsible for the blood sugar rise that we sometimes see during the night or in the early morning. The other “stress” hormones, particularly epinephrine (adrenaline) and cortisol, are produced when our body needs a rapid influx of sugar for energy purposes. The glucose rise I experienced during the scary Continue reading >>

How To Handle Anger During Low Blood Sugars

How To Handle Anger During Low Blood Sugars

How To Handle Anger During Low Blood Sugars Wed, 12/15/2010 - 11:58 -- Richard Morris by John Walsh, P.A., C.D.E., and Ruth Roberts, M.A. Copyright 1997, 2001, 2005 by Diabetes Services, Inc. Emotions and blood sugars are a two way street. Understanding their relationship can help in your blood sugar control. The brain controls the secretion of various stress hormones that can interfere with insulin's effectiveness. On the other hand, when high or low levels of sugar reach the brain, the result may be impaired memory, anger, irritability, slowed thinking, or depression. As blood sugars rise, the levels of hormones that prevent depression may be lowered. This can worsen symptoms of depression and leave a person with less interest in doing the things needed to improve control, such as thoughtful selection of food, regular exercise, and rest. A vicious cycle of growing depression and worsening control can arise. It helps in this altered situation for others to recognize as early as possible that a low blood sugar is taking place so that it may be treated quickly. People vary in how they experience a low blood sugar and how one individual may act during a particular low blood sugar can also vary tremendously. Here are common symptoms that indicate a low blood sugar is underway. Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Anger

Diabetes And Anger

Tweet Anger can be extremely destructive emotion with a detrimental impact on our physiology as well as our mental and emotional well being. What is anger? Anger is a strong feeling of displeasure, resentment and hostility that often arises in response to a perceived wrong doing. Anger initiates the stress response within the body causing blood sugar levels to rise, heart rate and blood pressure to increase. It is normal for people with diabetes to experience anger, often questioning why it is them with diabetes whilst other people are healthy. Why should I be mindful of anger? Anger frequently contributes to diabetes burnout, a person’s anger may encourage them to seek ‘freedom’ from the condition and neglect their self-management. It must be noted that anger is a natural emotion that has its uses in human existence, yet if not controlled, can lead to negative effects on health and social relationships. How can I manage anger? Mindfulness based approaches are recognised as an effective and lasting means of aiding the management of anger. Research has shown that by becoming aware of the triggers as well as the emotional, mental and physical impact of anger, an individual is able to recognise and respond rather than react to triggers which may have initiated an automatic reaction. [35] Why does anger need controlling? Anger if left un-addressed has the power to become hugely destructive, having a negative impact on mental and physical health including reduced glycaemia control. Patterns of anger expression have been associated with maladaptive alterations in cortisol secretion (sometimes referred to as the stress hormone), immune functioning, and surgical recovery. [44] Tweet Type 2 diabetes mellitus is a metabolic disorder that results in hyperglycemia (high blood Continue reading >>

Are People With Diabetes Prone To Violence?

Are People With Diabetes Prone To Violence?

Most people with insulin dependent diabetes have experienced the slipping, sliding loss of control and reason. A few units of insulin too many – an accidental overdose – can trigger a hypoglycemic episode. These experiences vary from person to person. In the case of Mike Hoskins, who lives with Type 1 diabetes, it can get pretty bad. Aliens invade. Conspiracy theories march through his mind. His wife wakes up at the middle of the night at risk of physical violence, because once his levels sink below 40, Mike bites, hits, and scratches. When he turns violent, they have a plan of action. “My wife, she’s smaller than I am. So we have a standing rule when I get uncooperative or even violent, she’ll call the paramedics.” Fortunately, this hasn’t happened in a few years, because Mike uses a continuous glucose monitor to alert him of dangerous lows. Hallucinations and aggressive violence are not part of everyone’s reaction to a dangerously low blood sugar. I, for example, tend to fall mute and still, paralyzed by confusion. Anyone who has experienced severe hypoglycemia knows the powerful effects of the condition. But is severe hypoglycemia the only cause of aggressive behavior related to diabetes? Several recent scientific studies have examined aggressive behavior and propose more facets to the relationship between blood sugar, exertion of self-control, and aggression. Some research even suggests that due to problems metabolizing glucose, people with diabetes are more prone to aggressive behavior and violent crime, including murder, rape, and robbery. Self-Control: A Finite Resource The most recent study of the relationship between blood sugar and aggression, published earlier this year, “Low glucose relates to greater aggression in married couples,” recei Continue reading >>

High Or Low Blood Glucose Making You Cranky? Here’s Why

High Or Low Blood Glucose Making You Cranky? Here’s Why

Mood changes can be a common experience in people with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2. Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager Gina, who has lived with type 1 diabetes for more than 39 years, addresses the affect blood sugar levels can have on your everyday emotions. The other day, I was driving and was suddenly overcome by a feeling of intense sadness; I started to cry. At the time, I thought I was reacting emotionally to a stressful week; I had been looking for a home to purchase, and my offer on a townhome I really liked had been rejected. Then, my Low Predictive alert sounded on my pump, and I realized the reason for the sudden change in my emotions was because my blood glucose (BG) had been dropping and was approaching a low level. Once my BG stabilized, I was fine. The sadness went away as quickly as it had come. Has this ever happened to you? There is a Reason: Your Brain! Well, there is an explanation! Your brain, the center of your thoughts and emotions, needs glucose to do its job. If you don’t have enough glucose to “feed your brain,” your brain can go “haywire”. Even though it seems like you are overly emotional, this is really a physical response to low BG (hypoglycemia). You don’t have to be below a certain number, like 70 mg/dL, to experience this. Your BG may be in the 80-130 md/dL range, or possibly higher, when the reaction occurs. It can be due to a rapid drop in your BG level instead of the actual level (1). Can high BG’s (hyperglycemia) affect your immediate emotions? It probably will not surprise you the answer is “yes.” High BG’s can make it difficult to think and concentrate. I know some people with diabetes tend to get grouchy and irritable when our sugar is high because any blood sugar outside of our desired range can make us Continue reading >>

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