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Anabolic Steroids Blood Glucose

Steroid Induced Diabetes

Steroid Induced Diabetes

Share: The development and proper use of steroids has been a modern day miracle in many respects. It has aided innumerable people to rapidly recover from a wide variety of ailments, resistant to other treatments. For all their good, however, steroids are dangerous drugs that can cause serious harm if misused or abused. For many people, steroids conjure up the vision of muscle building and, in sports, illegal performance enhancement. While such reputations are quite well-deserved, in reality there are two classifications of steroids, the distinction of which is important. They are anabolic steroids and corticosteroids. Anabolic Steroids Anabolic steroids include the hormone testosterone and related compounds that have muscle-building (anabolic) and masculinizing (androgenic) effects. (1) They sometimes are used illegally and may be dangerous, but also may be needed for some people with blood levels of testosterone lower than normal. In diabetes, especially type 2, some men have decreased levels of testosterone. The normal values for total testosterone in men is 270-1070 ng/dL or 9-38 nmol/L. (2) In general, values below 220 to 250 ng/dL are marked as low in most laboratories; values between 250 and 350 ng/dL should be considered borderline low. (3) Studies have been done in patients with decreased levels of testosterone. A recent testosterone replacement study was conducted in Germany using the long acting testosterone undecanoate (not available in the United States). Patients were followed for up to four years. In this study, 56 percent of the patients had metabolic syndrome* at the start of the study, which dropped to 30 percent after they were treated with testosterone for 57 months. Lab values such as triglycerides and glucose dropped. Blood pressure dropped and wais Continue reading >>

Insulin As A Drug Of Abuse In Body Building

Insulin As A Drug Of Abuse In Body Building

It is well publicised that a substantial proportion of professional and amateur body builders have been, or actively are, engaged in pharmacological manipulation of their physiological status in order to become more competitive in their field. Athletes are routinely subjected to drug testing, and, as the number of drugs that are detectable increases, some athletes may be tempted by newer, less well proven, but undetectable drugs, as illustrated over the past decade with the use of erythropoietin and growth hormone. As tests are developed to detect their use, there is greater pressure to find alternative drugs. CASE REPORT A 31 year old man presented to the emergency department having been found unconscious at home. On arrival he was diaphoretic, breathing spontaneously, with a Glasgow coma score of 6/15 (no eye opening, no speech, withdrawing to pain). Initial observations included respiratory rate of 20, pulse of 100, blood pressure 165/75 mm Hg, oxygen saturations 96% on 10 litres O2, and the bedside glucometer reading was “low” (confirmed as blood glucose 0.6 mmol/l). He was treated intravenously with 50 ml 50% dextrose, with immediate clinical improvement. Investigations performed at admission subsequently showed respiratory acidosis (pH 7.26, Pco2 9.9, Po2 11.5) and biochemical evidence of dehydration (urea 11.4 mmol/l). After the improvement in his clinical condition, we established that he was not a diabetic but was in fact a body builder who was dieting before a competition. He stated that he regularly used insulin three times a week to help increase his muscle bulk, but the previous day he had used a different type of insulin (fast acting) from usual. He also admitted to concurrent use of “steroids”. He was admitted to our observation ward where he made Continue reading >>

Bodybuilder Anabolic Steroid Abuse May Lead To Insulin Resistance

Bodybuilder Anabolic Steroid Abuse May Lead To Insulin Resistance

A new study links the abuse of anabolic steroids like testosterone to metabolic disease through insulin resistance. Insulin resistance is generally the precursor to type 2 diabetes and means that the body isn’t properly using its insulin. HealthDay News reported on the study carried out by researchers from in Denmark. Led by Dr. Jon Rasmussen from Herlev University Hospital in Copenhagen sought to find out the effects of anabolic steroid use on abdominal fat and insulin sensitivity in 100 men age 50 or under. Anabolic steroids are used by some men looking to increase their muscle building abilities. Their use is common among those involved in strength training. The researchers used 100 participants who did strength training and divided them into three groups. So 37 men in one group used anabolic steroids, 33 had taken them in the past, and 30 other men never took anabolic steroids before. The men were asked to fast overnight for at least 8 hours and then take a two-hour oral glucose tolerance test. Their blood sugar and insulin levels were then measured every half hour for two hours during the test. HealthDay reports that “Their insulin sensitivity–how well their bodies use insulin–was then determined using a standard formula. The higher the men’s result, the better their insulin sensitivity. Lower scores, on the other hand, were associated with greater insulin resistance, the study reported.” Can Anabolic Steroids Lead to Diabetes? Though researchers could not prove that anabolic steroids lead to diabetes by way of insulin resistance, they did find that the past and present users of anabolic steroids did have less insulin sensitivity than the men who never took the drugs. Using a DEXA scan, researchers discovered that while the men on steroids had a lower b Continue reading >>

How Steroids Affect Blood Glucose Levels

How Steroids Affect Blood Glucose Levels

The development and proper usage of steroids has been a modern-day miracle in many respects. It has aided many people to recover from a variety of diseases and medical conditions. Steroids are broadly classified into two types: corticosteroids and anabolic steroids Corticosteroids are hormones similar to those that occur naturally in the body which are used to fight, injury disease and stress. They`re useful anti-inflammatory medications and are used to treat dermatitis, asthma, arthritis, to suppress the immune system and to prevent nausea during medical procedures like chemotherapy. Anabolic steroids include testosterone and related compounds which have anabolic (muscle-building) and androgenic (masculinizing) effects. They are sometimes used illegally and can be dangerous, but also might be required for some individuals with blood testosterone levels lower than normal. Do steroids affect blood glucose levels? People who are taking steroids, find it harder to control the levels of glucose in their blood. Steroids cause an increase in blood glucose levels in 3 ways: 1. They inhibit the action of insulin which causes insulin resistance. 2. Reduce the transport of glucose from the bloodstream to muscle and adipose cells. This results in a high level of glucose in the blood. 3. They stimulate the liver to begin releasing extra glucose into the bloodstream. Inhaled steroids that are used for asthma haven`t been found to affect the levels of blood glucose. Nevertheless, blood glucose levels may begin to increase within a few days of commencing oral steroids and will then change depending on the type of steroid, time and dose you`re taking. A steroid injection into the muscle or joint can cause an increase in blood glucose levels soon after it`s administered and its effects Continue reading >>

Nandrolone Decanoate Inhibits Gluconeogenesis And Decreases Fasting Glucose In Wistar Male Rats

Nandrolone Decanoate Inhibits Gluconeogenesis And Decreases Fasting Glucose In Wistar Male Rats

Abstract The use of anabolic–androgenic steroids to improve physical performance or appearance has increased notably. The doses used are 10- to 100- fold higher than the therapeutic dose (TD), and this abuse can cause several side effects. Glucose metabolism is significantly affected by anabolic–androgenic steroid abuse, but studies about glycemic regulation during fasting are scarce. There are some evidences showing that testosterone can antagonize glucocorticoids action, which are crucial to glucose production during fasting. Thus, the aim of this study was to determine the impact of supraphysiological doses (SDs) of nandrolone decanoate (DECA) on rat glucose metabolism during fasting. Male Wistar rats were treated with i.m. injections of vehicle, a low TD (0.016 mg/100 g b.w.-TD group) or a high SD (1 mg/100 g b.w.-SD group) of DECA, once a week for 8 weeks. After 12 h fasting, we evaluated glucose and pyruvate tolerance tests, liver glycogen content, serum levels of gluconeogenic substrates, insulin and corticosterone, glucose uptake and hexokinase (HK) activity in skeletal muscle, and the adrenal catecholamine content. SD group had increased serum insulin levels and a blunted response to insulin regarding glucose uptake in skeletal muscle. Fasting serum glucose decreased significantly in SD group, as well as the pyruvate tolerance test and liver glycogen content. Moreover, serum levels of glycerol were increased in SD group. Our data indicate that SDs of DECA exert effects on different regulatory points of glucose metabolism, resulting in defective gluconeogenesis and decreased skeletal muscle glucose uptake in response to insulin. Continue reading >>

Bodybuilders' Steroid Abuse Linked To Pre-diabetic Condition

Bodybuilders' Steroid Abuse Linked To Pre-diabetic Condition

home / diabetes center / diabetes a-z list / bodybuilders' steroid abuse linked to pre-diabetes article Bodybuilders' Steroid Abuse Linked to Pre-Diabetic Condition Want More News? Sign Up for MedicineNet Newsletters! WEDNESDAY, Sept. 14, 2016 (HealthDay News) -- Weightlifters' abuse of anabolic steroids -- synthetic drugs that closely mimic male sex hormones, such as testosterone -- may also lead to insulin resistance , a new study suggests. Insulin resistance is a condition where the muscles, liver and fat cells don't use insulin properly, according to the U.S. National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK). It can lead to the development of type 2 diabetes , NIDDK says. A team of researchers led by Dr. Jon Rasmussen from Herlev University Hospital in Copenhagen investigated the effects of anabolic steroids on the belly fat and insulin sensitivity of 100 men who were 50 years old or younger. All of the men were involved in strength training . The researchers divided the men into three groups based on their use of anabolic steroids: 37 men were currently using the drugs, 33 had done so in the past and 30 never took them. After an overnight fast of at least eight hours, the men took a standard two-hour test for diabetes called an oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT). The men's blood sugar and insulin levels were measured every 30 minutes for two hours during the test. Their insulin sensitivity -- how well their bodies use insulin -- was then determined using a standard formula. The higher the men's result, the better their insulin sensitivity. Lower scores, on the other hand, were associated with greater insulin resistance, the study reported. The men's belly fat distribution was also measured using special imaging technology, known as a DEXA sc Continue reading >>

Steroids And Bg - A1c And Blood Sugars - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Steroids And Bg - A1c And Blood Sugars - Diabetes | Healthcentral

Ive gotten questions about medical use of steroids resulting in elevation of blood glucose (BG) levels. Were not talking about use of anabolic steroids by athletes trying to bulk up, but use of standard steroids for temporary conditions like severe poison ivy and for chronic conditions like rheumatoid arthritis. Its well known to physicians that prednisone, cortisone, dexamethasone, and all the other meds that are known medically as glucocorticoids will universally raise BG levels. But sometimes physicians dont inform their patients, or dont tell them what to do when the BG level skyrockets. Ask the treating physician how long the steroid therapy will be needed (which is a pretty good guide to how long the elevated blood sugars will persist). Ask the treating physician to have their staff call or fax the diabetes doctor, and advise the diabetes doc of the medication, the dose, and the anticipated duration of therapy. Start checking at least four blood sugar tests daily, and to plan to increase the diabetes medications within a half-day of starting steroid therapy. Phone your diabetes team as soon as possible, and doublecheck what to do with the diabetes medications. (Dont wait till 10 P.M. at night, when the bedtime blood sugar is suddenly higher than usual) With some care and caution, you can maintain control of your diabetes while on steroids. So, if they are needed, theyre okay to use just plan to do some extra work Bill Quick, M.D., is a physician who is living with diabetes. He is the editor of www.D-is-for-Diabetes.com. Dr. Quick wrote about diabetes for HealthCentral. Continue reading >>

Blood Sugar Level To High...

Blood Sugar Level To High...

my buddy called me and told me his blood sugar level was 400 and that he was taking 50mg a day of dbol and 500mg a week of test...has anyone ever heard of AAS causing someones blood sugar level to be so high? on my first or second cycle they did my diet back then wasnt as good as it is now but what i did was i lowered the dbol dose my 10 or 15 and it lowered i mean it was still high till i finished my whole cycle but it did lower basic human physiology is that steroids will increase you blood glucose levels. now to what degree all depends. there are many variables too. did he do a fasting blood glucose test or just go take his glucose level after just eating or drinking? this will cause numbers to be high. get some more info from him. if he has a hba1c test done it will give him a 90 day average of his levels. but 400 is really high. norms are basically between 70 and 120. but as i said if he just ate or drank then they can be higher. so more info is needed. yes i understand that, the test and dbol will elevate his levels. and as i said so will eating a large meal and drinking a soda so it may be a combination of things. the main thing i am wondering is when did he check his levels. if it was first thing in the morning before he ate or drank anything then it is a lot different. also if he drank any liquor the night b4 could have some affect on his levels he went to the hospital and they took it...it got up to 573...now hes on meds to lower it...hes been drinking alot I told him to stop completely...he has and now it's back down to the 300's...thank you... holy crap 573 shit lol make sure he stop drinking for a while lol alcohol will absolutely raise it as well ..... yes you are a good friend to try to intervene. however it is very hard to make people understand how ser Continue reading >>

Steroids

Steroids

Cortisone (now mainly referred to as cortisol) is the main hormone produced by the adrenal gland, and belongs to a group of hormones called glucocorticoids, which is a class of steroids. Glucocorticoids antagonize or counter the effects of insulin and increase gluconeogenesis--basically they have an overall blood sugar raising effect[1]. All of us produce extra cortisol daily; it's done shortly before we awaken. The body prepares itself to go into "wake mode" and releases cortisol to ready itself for wake up. In non-diabetics, it happens virtually unnoticed, as the properly working pancreas produces more insulin to handle the cortisol release. Persons without diabetes are unlikely to be checking their blood glucose values on a regular basis, so any temporary increases would not be measured. But with diabetes, it can become a problem known as Dawn phenomenon; the rise in cortisol levels brings with it a corresponding rise in blood glucose, meaning high morning testing values--even before eating. Everyone with diabetes does not have this occurrence, just as all cats aren't white or all dogs brown. Cortisol is involved in the response to stress; it increases blood pressure and blood sugar levels and suppresses the immune system. Note that this is why stress is known to raise blood sugar levels and cause hyperglycemia in diabetic pets. Pets with Cushing's disease are self-administering extra cortisol from the adrenal glands, all the time, leading to hyperglycemia and secondary diabetes. There is another class of steroids in need of mention here. They are called anabolic steroids, and are related to the male sex hormone, testosterone[2]. Their main uses are for medically supervised weight gain, [3]inappetance, (most commonly Winstrol/Stanozolol),[4], in treatment of some for Continue reading >>

Anabolic Steroids & Diabetes (can They Induce Diabetes & Hyperglycemia?)

Anabolic Steroids & Diabetes (can They Induce Diabetes & Hyperglycemia?)

Using steroids for bodybuilding can alter your blood sugar levels, suggesting a potential connection between anabolic steroids and diabetes. If you have type 1 or type 2 diabetes, it’s essential that you understand how bodybuilding steroids can affect your health. If you’re considering using steroids to support your bodybuilding routine, you need to know about the potential they hold to cause steroid induced diabetes and hyperglycemia. Buy legal steroids online here. Anabolic Steroids & Diabetes A hindered ability to process insulin can be one outcome in the cascade of effects precipitated by anabolic steroids. This makes contracting diabetes a distinct possibility. Diabetes is a broad term for different kinds of metabolic diseases that result in high blood sugar levels. These levels typically stem from low production of insulin (a peptide hormone that creates glucose from glycogen), a failure of the body to respond to insulin, or a combination of both. The most common types of diabetes are: Type 1: When you have Type 1 diabetes, your immune system attacks cells that produce insulin and eventually leads to an insulin deficiency. Without insulin, your body cannot absorb sugar and create energy. Type 2: This form of diabetes stems from either the body resisting insulin—preventing it from using it the right way—or not creating enough of it. Regardless, the end result is an increase in blood sugar. Other Types: Diabetes can develop in other ways too, including gestational diabetes, which is temporary and occurs during pregnancy, and steroid induced diabetes, which stems from prolonged steroid use. Steroid Induced Diabetes A wealth of research supports the notion that glucocorticoids, a class of steroid hormones used in many facets of the medicinal world, can lead to Continue reading >>

Test E & Glucose Levels

Test E & Glucose Levels

Ok, I've had some blood work done through my latest cycle, I'm on week 9 of test e 500mg a week cycle. I'm also do Stane at 1ml twice a week. But I just started that, I had been doing .5 twice a week, and only to try to control bloating. I was turning pretty red. However, this week I had a low glucose blood lab result. I then realized they've been everywhere the last year, but all on high range. Needless to say, my doctor wants to do follow up. So I need to understand how this cycle is impacting my glucose levels, if at all. Here are my results since July 2015, and some from 2006. I started my cycle in Early August. So the July on are what concerns me. Do any of you believe the test e and glucose results are related. I hadn't eaten for like 4 hours before I took the last glucose test, I had a busy morning. But normally I eat about an hour or two before the test. None of these came while fasting. It has been shown that taking supplemental testosterone can lead to hypoglycemia because of increased rate of muscle glycogen synthesis. More glucose is taken out of the bloodstream to make glycogen. That is why a higher calorie diet, higher protein intake because of increased muscle protein synthesis and higher carbs because of glycogen production and higher energy demands, is recommended, even in a medical setting. Thank you. I've been having issues with feeling dizzy, headache, and low energy. These don't last long, and go away shortly after drinking O.J. I'm eating a lot, so much that I'm gaining some fat, while putting on decent muscle. But it's all pretty healight stuff, until I introduced the O.J.. I eat shredded wheat for breakfast. And every other meal is brown rice, broccoli, carrots, black beans, chicken, and low fat cheese. It's not inventive, but makes eating healt Continue reading >>

Steroid Diabetes

Steroid Diabetes

Steroid diabetes (also "steroid-induced diabetes") is a medical term referring to prolonged hyperglycemia due to glucocorticoid therapy for another medical condition. It is usually, but not always, a transient condition. Medical conditions[edit] The most common glucocorticoids which cause steroid diabetes are prednisolone and dexamethasone given systemically in "pharmacologic doses" for days or weeks. Typical medical conditions in which steroid diabetes arises during high-dose glucocorticoid treatment include severe asthma, organ transplantation, cystic fibrosis, inflammatory bowel disease, and induction chemotherapy for leukemia or other cancers. Insulin[edit] Glucocorticoids oppose insulin action and stimulate gluconeogenesis, especially in the liver, resulting in a net increase in hepatic glucose output. Most people can produce enough extra insulin to compensate for this effect and maintain normal glucose levels, but those who cannot develop steroid diabetes. Criteria[edit] The diagnostic criteria for steroid diabetes are those of diabetes (fasting glucoses persistently above 125 mg/dl (7 mM) or random levels above 200 mg/dl (11 mM)) occurring in the context of high-dose glucocorticoid therapy. Insulin levels are usually detectable, and sometimes elevated, but inadequate to control the glucose. In extreme cases the hyperglycemia may be severe enough to cause nonketotic hyperosmolar coma. Treatment[edit] Treatment depends on the severity of the hyperglycemia and the estimated duration of the steroid treatment. Mild hyperglycemia in an immunocompetent patient may not require treatment if the steroids will be discontinued in a week or two. Moderate hyperglycemia carries an increased risk of infection, especially fungal, and especially in people with other risk factors s Continue reading >>

7 Ways Anabolic Steroids Affect Your Health

7 Ways Anabolic Steroids Affect Your Health

17 March 2017 | Dr Stephen Beattie (MBChB MRCGP) 7 ways anabolic steroids affect your health Androgenic-anabolic steroids (AAS) have been used to enhance athletic performance since the 1940s, but some of the health risks of steroid abuse have only recently come to light. Anabolic steroids have widespread effects on the body and its internal systems, so its not surprising that aside from their potential effect on muscle growth, they can harm other cells and organs. That's why regular health screening and blood testing is so important. Find out more with our Sports Hormone Check . Anabolic steroids are synthetic derivatives of the hormone testosterone which amongst other things is responsible for muscle development - the anabolic effect, and the development of male sexual characteristics - the androgenic effect. Anabolic steroids work in several different ways in the body: When we lift heavy weights we create tiny micro-tears in muscle fibres. Testosterone stimulates the creation of new and bigger muscle fibres in reaction to this. Anabolic steroids tend to cause an exaggerated version of this reaction due to the high doses people use. Anabolic steroids stimulate production of growth hormone (GH) which in turn stimulates the production of IGF-1. IGF-1 has growth-promoting effects on almost every cell in the body especially skeletal muscle, cartilage and bone. Intense exercise releases cortisol known as the stress hormone, which breaks down muscle tissue. Anabolic steroids inhibit this breakdown resulting in an overall anabolic effect. There is evidence that anabolic steroids may increase oxygen uptake and increase cardiac output. Anabolic steroids may also improve athletic performance by increasing aggressive behaviour. A common misconception is that because anabolic ste Continue reading >>

Steroids And Diabetes: The Effect On Your Glucose Levels

Steroids And Diabetes: The Effect On Your Glucose Levels

Autumn is approaching with its beautiful fall foliage, hayrides at the pumpkin patch, and harvest festivals, as well as its sniffles and running noses. Cold and flu season is a drab for everyone, but can be particularly worrisome for people with diabetes. In addition to worrying about how being sick will affect their glucose levels and whether or not cold and flu medications are sugar free, being prescribed corticosteroid (steroids) adds a whole other layer of concern. Medtronic Diabetes Clinical Manager, Beth Spencer Kline, MSN, RN, NP-C, CD is back to discuss an important aspect of diabetes management, steroid effects on blood glucose. What are steroids? Steroids are medications used to reduce inflammation and suppress the immune system. Steroid treatment is commonly prescribed for short periods of time to treat conditions such as rashes, musculoskeletal pain, injury, and respiratory ailments. However, steroids can also be prescribed for longer periods of time to treat certain inflammatory disorders, autoimmune disorders, and organ transplants. While steroids can help reduce inflammation and reduce pain, they can also significantly increase blood glucose levels in people with diabetes, as well as individuals with impaired glucose tolerance or pre-diabetes. Why is this? Steroids increase the liver’s release of glucose, and cause insulin resistance, which leads to insulin (either injected or made by one’s own pancreas) working less efficiently. What if I’m prescribed steroids and have diabetes? First, let your prescribing doctor know you have diabetes, because they may be able to prescribe an alternative medication that will not affect your glucose levels. If alternative medication is not an option, inform your diabetes healthcare team immediately so they can dete Continue reading >>

Growth Hormone, Steroids And Diabetes

Growth Hormone, Steroids And Diabetes

If you check the medical literature for side effects of growth hormone use, you’ll note that diabetes often makes the list. A common effect of GH use is insulin resistance, which is considered a harbinger of full-blown diabetes. In fact, insulin resistance is often called “pre-diabetes.” Estimates are that as many as 50 million Americans fit the criteria for insulin resistance. GH enters the picture because it triggers the release of large amounts of free fatty acids into the blood. The free fatty acids, in turn, interfere with the uptake of glucose, or blood sugar, into cells, and the body attempts to compensate by producing more insulin. Insulin aides glucose uptake into cells, but as the body continues to release large amounts of insulin, the cells become resistant to it. Hence the insulin resistance. Bodybuilders and other athletes are aware of this GH side effect. They often counter it by adding insulin injections to their drug stacks, which serves two purposes: 1) It counters the hyperglycemia, or elevated blood glucose, brought on by GH-induced insulin resistance; 2) it has anticatabolic effects in muscle, and when used with GH and anabolic steroids, it appears to add a layer of anabolic efficiency. Insulin also favors amino acid uptake into muscle and triggers the enzyme that produces muscle glycogen, an effect that creates a fuller-appearing muscle. Of course, using insulin is not without its dangers. Injecting it without taking in carbohydrate can lead to a disastrous drop in blood glucose. That, in turn, can cause a person to pass out suddenly or, depending on the dose used, lapse into a coma. The coma effect has actually happened to several well-known professional bodybuilders. Luckily, they all survived. Then there are the aesthetic side effects of us Continue reading >>

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