diabetestalk.net

American Diabetes Association Psychosocial

Psychosocial Session Track At Aade 18

Psychosocial Session Track At Aade 18

Home 2018 Preview Psychosocial Session Track at AADE 18 Jasmine D. Gonzalvo, PharmD, BCPS, BC-ADM, CDE, LDE In recent years, across the nation, much more attention has been focused on mental health. Recognizing the five signs that someone may be struggling is an important component of the Campaign to Change Direction , which aims to change the culture of mental health in America so that all of those in need receive the care and support they deserve. In line with this healthcare focus, AADE18 (taking place this August in Baltimore, MD) will offer a psychosocial/behavioral health track. Diabetes educators often encounter people who struggle with a variety of mental health issues, ranging from diabetes distress to serious mental illness. Unfortunately, our resources for support are often limited. AADE18 is packed with presentations aimed at addressing obstacles faced by diabetes educators who are looking to expand their toolbox of mental health resources. This track will feature expert, engaging speakers from around the nation who will speak on overcoming barriers, engaging support systems, college transition planning, motivational interviewing, effective communication strategies, shared decision making, disordered eating, overall best practices and more! Mary deGroot , PhD, is a clinical health psychologist and well-known leading expert in the field of mental health in diabetes. She has contributed to more than 50 publications in this topic area. At AADE18, she will be presenting about the relationship of mental health issues and diabetes: implications for diabetes educators. You wont want to miss her session! In the psychosocial/behavioral health track, you will also have the opportunity to hear from presenters from the College Diabetes Network , the Diabulimia Helpline Continue reading >>

T1dm Through The Life Span: Ada Position Statement

T1dm Through The Life Span: Ada Position Statement

Family issues in type 1 diabetes management Developing a trusting relationship or bond with primary caregiver(s) Avoiding extreme fluctuations in blood glucose levels Sharing the burden of care to avoid parent burnout Developing a sense of mastery and autonomy Avoiding extreme fluctuations in blood glucose levels due to irregular food intake Limit-setting and coping with toddler's lack of cooperation with regimen Preschooler and early elementary school (37 years) Developing initiative in activities and confidence in self Reassuring child that diabetes is no one's fault Coping with unpredictable appetite and activity Educating other caregivers about diabetes management Positively reinforcing cooperation with regimen Trusting other caregivers with diabetes management Developing skills in athletic, cognitive, artistic, and social areas Making diabetes regimen flexible to allow for participation in school or peer activities Maintaining parental involvement in insulin and blood glucose management tasks while allowing for independent self-care for special occasions Consolidating self-esteem with respect to the peer group Child learning short- and long-term benefits of optimal control Continuing to educate school and other caregivers Age and characteristics of onset of diabetes (e.g., DKA, asymptomatic laboratory finding) Eating patterns, physical activity habits, nutritional status, and weight history Whether or not patient wears medical alert identification Diabetes education history; health literacy assessment Review of previous insulin treatment regimens and response to therapy (A1C records), treatment preferences, and prior difficulty with therapies Current treatment of diabetes, including medications and medication adherence, meal plan, physical activity patterns, and r Continue reading >>

Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant From Helmsley

Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant From Helmsley

News, Events and Publications / Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant from Helmsley Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program Receives Nearly $1 Million Grant from Helmsley 07.14.17 | Type 1 Diabetes | Helmsley Announcements More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and people with diabetes face multiple, complex environmental, social, behavioral, and emotional issuesknown as psychosocial factorsthat influence their health and ability to manage the disease. In collaboration with the American Psychological Association (APA), the American Diabetes Associations (Association) first Mental Health Provider Diabetes Education Program , which was launched last month, has received an $839,000 grant from The Leona M. and Harry B. Helmsley Charitable Trust to support the program. Psychosocial challenges, including mental health issues such as depression, anxiety, diabetes distress, and disordered eating have frequently been overlooked in diabetes care. Having supported the integration of psychosocial care for people with diabetes in our position statement Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes and our Standards of Medical Care in Diabetes 2017, we are excited to launch this program to increase the number of mental health providers knowledgeable about diabetes, said Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, vice president of lifestyle management at the Association. The lack of mental health providers experienced in caring for people with diabetes is a huge gap in our healthcare system. Thank you to the Helmsley Charitable Trust for supporting our efforts to increase the capacity of mental health providers with the important knowledge and expertise to provide care and support for people living with diabetes. The AssociationsStandards of Continue reading >>

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed By Ada In First Published Recommendations

Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed by ADA in First Published Recommendations Diabetes Psychosocial Care Addressed by ADA in First Published Recommendations Evidence-based guidelines and clinician recommendations have been evaluated to create the first-of-its-kind statement focused on psychosocial care of people with diabetes. To combat depression and anxiety disorders , the authors recommend annual screening of all patients, particularly those with a history of anxiety or depression, either self-reported or documented in medical records. A directive to promptly refer all patients who meet clinical criteria for a diagnosis of depression to a mental or behavioral health professional received an A grade. Similarly, patients who meet criteria for an anxiety disorder should be referred for treatment. In both cases, assessment of self-management behaviors is recommended since both depression and anxiety can effect adherence. Patients who have anxiety secondary to episodes of severe hypoglycemia should be evaluated for hypoglycemia unawareness and treated using Blood Glucose Awareness Training or a similar, evidence-based intervention (A grade). Clinical and Subclinical Disordered Eating Diagnosable eating disorders are associated with high rates of comorbid psychiatric conditions in people with diabetes.10 Unhealthy behaviors including omitting insulin injections in order to lose weight and binge eating are common in both type 1 and type 2 diabetes. 11-13 When assessing disordered eating behavior clinicians should examine patients' motivation and intentions to help determine if medication or treatment regimen changes are appropriate. To manage disordered eating behaviors, the authors gave B grades to 2 recommendations: consider evaluating treatment regimen when a patient p Continue reading >>

The New Psychosocial Position Statement From The American Diabetes Association

The New Psychosocial Position Statement From The American Diabetes Association

The New Psychosocial Position Statement from the American Diabetes Association US Endocrinology, 2017;13(1):101 DOI: Keywords: Psychosocial, education, support, diabetes distress Disclosure: Linda Siminerio has served on an advisory panel for Becton, Dickinson and Company. No funding has been received for the publication of this article. This is an expert interview and as such has not undergone the journal's standard peer review process. Acknowledgments: Editorial assistance was provided by Catherine Amey, Freelance Medical Writer, supported by Touch Medical Media. Authorship: All named authors meet the International Committee of Medical Journal Editors (ICMJE) criteria for authorship of this manuscript, take responsibility for the integrity of the work as a whole, and have given final approval to the version to be published. Open Access: This article is published under the Creative Commons Attribution Noncommercial License, which permits any noncommercial use, distribution, adaptation, and reproduction provided the original author(s) and source are given appropriate credit. Received: March 20, 2017 Citation US Endocrinology, 2017;13(1):101 DOI: Correspondence: Linda Siminerio, Professor of Medicine and Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Falk Medical Building, Room 570, 3601 Fifth Avenue, Pittsburgh PA 15213, US. E: [email protected] Diabetes self-management education and support provides the foundation for helping people with diabetes to be able to navigate decisions and activities related to managing their life-long disease. Here, Linda Siminerio of the School of Medicine and Nursing, University of Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, US, discusses psychological factors affecting people with diabetes, self-management and the multiple benefits of ongoing education and support. Continue reading >>

Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science

Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science

Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science The Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science is responsible for advancing the American Diabetes Associations mission by overseeing the administration and implementation of key mission-driven initiatives that address the behavioral and psychosocial well-being of people living with, and at risk for, diabetes. Working with cross-functional teams (i.e. from Medical Affairs, Youth and Adult Programs, Center for Information, Advocacy, Constituent Engagement, and Development) to formulate a strategy for delivering thoughtful, clinically-relevant and effective information and programs that address psychosocial health for people with diabetes, those at risk for developing diabetes, and for their caregivers Provide subject matter expertise on psychosocial content and serve as an internal and external resource to ensure that all existing Association initiatives, educational materials and services appropriately address psychosocial and behavioral aspects of diabetes Develop and administer professional education/CE programs for mental health care providers and medical practitioners to ensure that they possess the necessary background and understanding of the psychosocial needs of people living with diabetes to facilitate proper treatment and referral;administer associated mental health care provider directory that allows patients and providers to easily identify mental health resources with necessary background for treating people with diabetes On behalf of the Association, manage and coordinate various volunteer-led collaborations and external activities, including consensus conferences, scientific meetings and policy or regulatory initiatives relevant to psychosocial and behavioral science, treatment or outcomes; serve as a primary staff Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science Job Opening In Arlington, Va | Livecareer

American Diabetes Association Director, Behavioral Psychosocial Science Job Opening In Arlington, Va | Livecareer

VIEW JOBS 6/12/2018 12:00:00 AM 2018-09-10T00:00 Full-time Director of Behavioral Health needed in Northern Virginia!Position: Nurse Director of Behavioral Health: AdultShift: Full-time Days/ No WeekendsJoin a mental health care facility offering hope, help, encouragement, support and a full range of treatment options with a distinctive focus on crisis intervention and stabilization through inpatient and partial hospitalization programs, as well as strong outpatient referral network.Job Summary:- The Director of Adult Services oversees the Adult Inpatient Program. The Director is responsible for staffing, supervision, risk management, quality improvement, and related activities.- The Director is responsible for milieu management, shift coordination, interdepartmental communication and collaboration with the multidisciplinary team.- Participates in formulating organization policy, develops and/or reviews procedures essential to the achievement of objectives and the ability to make recommendations to Senior Management.- Serves as a role model, organizes respective department services to meet the goals and objectives of the hospital mission.- Responsible for the planning, implementation, supervision, and evaluation of the department staff and fiscal policies of the department.- Promote and continually educate employees on concept of excellent service for all customers of the hospital, to include patients, visitors, physicians and employees.- Accountable for creating a system which fosters participation and collaboration in planning, implementing and evaluating standards to insure safe, efficient and therapeutically effective health care.Specific Job Functions:* Ability to use planning, research, foresight and facility goals and needs to analyze and make decisions without Continue reading >>

The Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

The Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

The ADA Issues Guidelines for Psychosocial Care in Diabetes The ADA released detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released its first position statement that includes detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The specific recommendations are available in "Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the America Diabetes Association" which will be published inDiabetes Care. The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors affecting patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders . It emphasizes that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are integrated into diabetes care. The position statement was based on diabetes research and recommendations combined with expertise of the study authors. Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA added, "People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety , and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medical aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that psychosocial factors have on people living with diabetes. Every person's needs are different, so individualized, patient-focused care that includes a mental health component should be a part of a comprehensive diabetes care plan for every person with diabetes." Cognitive Ability and Brain Gray Matter in Adolescents With Type 2 Diabetes Clinicians are encouraged to assess Continue reading >>

Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

Ada Issues Guidelines For Psychosocial Care In Diabetes

ADA Issues Guidelines for Psychosocial Care in Diabetes The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released its first position statement that includes detailed guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care based on factors including age, type of diabetes, and family support system. The specific recommendations are available in "Psychosocial Care for People with Diabetes: A Position Statement of the America Diabetes Association" which will be published inDiabetes Care. The ADA's guidelines address the most common psychological factors affecting patients with type 1 and type 2 diabetes, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders. It emphasizes that diabetes management is more successful when lifestyle and emotional status are integrated into diabetes care. FDA Approves Soliqua 100/33 for Type 2 Diabetes The position statement was based on diabetes research and recommendations combined with expertise of the study authors. Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA added, "People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medical aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that psychosocial factors have on people living with diabetes. Every person's needs are different, so individualized, patient-focused care that includes a mental health component should be a part of a comprehensive diabetes care plan for every person with diabetes." Clinicians are encouraged to assess the patient's emotional health and life circumstances during the first visit, and to perform necessary evaluations the Continue reading >>

Response To Comments On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Response To Comments On Young-hyman Et Al. Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Response to Comments on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association Sep 13, 2017 | posted by Kelsey Bennett | Article of the Week | ARTICLE: Response to Comments on Young-Hyman et al. Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association AUTHORS: Deborah Young-Hyman, Mary de Groot, Felicia Hill-Briggs , Jeffrey Gonzalez, Korey Hoodand Mark Peyrot JOURNAL: Diabetes Care. 2017 Sep;40(9):e131-e132. doi: 10.2337/dci16-0051. Thanks to Drs. Kalra, Balhara, Mezuk, Pouwer, and Campbell and Ms. Macdonald for their careful consideration ( 1 3 ) of the first American Diabetes Association (ADA) psychosocial guidelines Position Statement ( 4 ). Kalra and Balhara ( 1 ) note the overlaps and differences in the content of the ADA and Indian position statements, with particular emphasis on the cultural appropriateness and specificity of recommendations. Mezuk and Pouwer ( 2 ) question the need for routine screening for depression in persons with impaired glucose metabolism and undiagnosed diabetes based on meta-analytic results ( 5 ) and note the need to address disparities in diabetes burden and quality of care. They further suggest the need for action steps for practitioners once psychosocial issues are identified that impact health outcomes. These concerns are echoed by Macdonald and Campbell ( 3 ) when identifying that emphasis on compliance can cause blame to be placed on patients through misguided interpretation of the patient-centered paradigm. They suggest that this might be avoided through long-term care, by which they appear to mean the relationship formed through long-term follow-through by a consistent care provider. These authors identify social issu Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.apa.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.225.250.211 on 2017-12-29 11:58:17 UTC. Trace: b9924665-cc98-411c-ad42-3a989f35f6f3 via 6c165df1-229c-45f6-93e6-eafce89e5297 Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes Diabetes Care; 2016 Dec; Young-Hyman, et al The American Diabetes Association (ADA) has issued a position statement on psychosocial care for people with diabetes. These evidence-based guidelines offer recommendations based on commonly used clinical models, expert consensus, and tested interventions, taking into account available resources, practice patterns, and practitioner burden. Recommendations include: Psychosocial care should be integrated with collaborative, patient-centered medical care and provided to all people with diabetes, with the goals of optimizing health outcomes and health-related quality of life. Providers should consider an assessment of symptoms of diabetes distress, depression, anxiety, and disordered eating and of cognitive capacities using patient-appropriate standardized/validated tools at the initial visit, at periodic intervals, and when there is a change in disease, treatment, or life circumstance. Including caregivers and family members in this assessment is recommended. Consider monitoring patient performance of self-management behaviors as well as psychosocial factors impacting the persons self-management. Consider assessment of life circumstances that can affect physical and psychological health outcomes and their incorporation into intervention strategies. Addressing psychosocial problems upon identification is recommended. If an intervention cannot be initiated during the visit when the problem is identified, a follow-up visit or referral to a qualified behavioral health care provider may be scheduled during that visit. Young-Hyman D, de Groot M, Hill-Briggs F, Gonzalez JS, Hood K, Peyrot M. Psychosocial care for people with diabetes: A position statement of the American Diabetes Association. Continue reading >>

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes: A Position Statement Of The American Diabetes Association

Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes: A Position Statement of the American Diabetes Association 1Office of Behavioral and Social Science Research, National Institutes of Health, Bethesda, MD 2Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN 3Johns Hopkins School of Medicine, Baltimore, MD 4Yeshiva University and the Albert Einstein College of Medicine, Bronx, NY 6Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD Author information Copyright and License information Disclaimer Copyright 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered. More information is available at . This article has been cited by other articles in PMC. Complex environmental, social, behavioral, and emotional factors, known as psychosocial factors, influence living with diabetes, both type 1 and type 2, and achieving satisfactory medical outcomes and psychological well-being. Thus, individuals with diabetes and their families are challenged with complex, multifaceted issues when integrating diabetes care into daily life. To promote optimal medical outcomes and psychological well-being, patient-centered care is essential, defined as providing care that is respectful of and responsive to individual patient preferences, needs, and values and ensuring that patient values guide all clinical decisions ( 1 ). Practicing personalized, patient-centered psychosocial care requires that communications and interactions, problem identification, psychosocial screening, diagnostic evaluation, and intervention services take into account the context of the person with diabetes (PWD) and the values and preferences of the PWD. This article provides diabetes care providers with evidence Continue reading >>

Ada Releases Statement On Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Ada Releases Statement On Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

ADA releases statement on psychosocial care for people with diabetes Young-Hyman D, et al. Diabetes Care. 2016;doi:10.2337/dc16-2053. Recommendations for comprehensive and specific guidelines for psychosocial assessments and care-based factors for diabetes have recently been released in a position statement from the American Diabetes Association, according to a press release. Many psychosocial factors, including diabetes distress, depression, anxiety and eating disorders, affect people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes . This newest position statement emphasizes lifestyle management as well as addressing emotional status as integral parts of diabetes care. The recommendations include the following: Psychosocial care should be combined with collaborative, patient-centered medical care for all patients with diabetes; Assessment of symptoms of diabetes distress , depression, anxiety and disordered eating should be considered by health care providers; Patient performance of self-management behaviors should also be monitored by health care providers; Assessment of life circumstances that may affect physical and psychological health outcomes should be considered by health care providers; When psychosocial problems are identified they should be addressed immediately. Diabetes is unique in that it is a disease that is managed on a daily basis by the person who has diabetes, and this can lead to increased stress, Alicia McAuliffe-Fogarty, PhD, clinical health psychologist and vice president of the lifestyle management team at the ADA, said in a press release. People with diabetes have a greater risk of depression and anxiety, and while medical providers are trained to help people manage the medial aspects of their disease, they are not always taught to understand the impact that Continue reading >>

Ada Calls For Integrating Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Ada Calls For Integrating Psychosocial Care For People With Diabetes

Newsroom Published on: November 28, 2016 ADA Calls for Integrating Psychosocial Care for People With Diabetes The statement calls for delivery behavioral health services through a collaborative model when possible, both to share electronic health data and offer convenience and continuity for patients. The American Diabetes Association has called for fully integrating psychosocial care into diabetes treatment, ideally through a collaborative model that asks during the first visit after diagnosis whether a patient is experiencing depression or distress. The statement is published in the December issue of Diabetes Care. Healthcare providerswho may often be primary care physiciansshould revisit the mental health and cognitive status of persons with diabetes, when there is a change in disease, treatment, or life circumstance. The statement calls for bringing caregivers and family members into this process, and for monitoring a patients self-management skills as part of this evaluation. The statement calls on providers to form partnerships or alliances with behavioral health professionals who are well versed in the needs of those with diabetes. Ideally, these partners should be embedded in diabetes care settings. A joint location will allow sharing of records, including electronic health data, and maximize the effort to improve the patients disease management. Collaborative care, which calls for putting primary and behavioral healthcare under one roof, is not a new concept; it was pioneered by the University of Washington School of Medicine, and its success specifically for patients who had both diabetes and depression was presented in the New England Journal of Medicine in 2010. It has received increased attention in recent years due to the Affordable Care Act, which allowe Continue reading >>

More in diabetes