diabetestalk.net

American Diabetes Association Prediabetes

New Prediabetes Awareness Campaign Features Unexpected Animal Videos To Encourage Americans To Learn Their Risk

New Prediabetes Awareness Campaign Features Unexpected Animal Videos To Encourage Americans To Learn Their Risk

New York, NY, July 25, 2017: Building on a successful campaign that helped hundreds of thousands of Americans learn their risk of developing type 2 diabetes through campaign messaging and an online risk test, the first-of-its-kind initiative to raise national awareness of prediabetes returns with an entertaining new approach. The new campaign, launching today, encourages viewers to take a one-minute prediabetes risk test to know where they stand and discover how they can decrease their risk of developing type 2 diabetes — and it does so with some adorable helpers. More than one in three American adults has prediabetes — a serious health condition that often leads to type 2 diabetes and other significant health conditions like blindness, heart attack or stroke. According to newly released CDC data, however, nearly 90 percent of the 84 million people with prediabetes don’t know they have it and aren’t aware of the long-term risks to their health. Currently, about 30 million Americans are living with diabetes. The new campaign, once again developed pro bono by Ogilvy New York for the Ad Council campaign, features puppies, hedgehogs and baby goats. The new, lighthearted PSAs offer viewers a “perfect way to spend a minute” where they can learn where they stand by taking the one-minute prediabetes risk test while also doing something everyone loves — watching adorable animal videos. The campaign highlights that it’s important to speak with a doctor and visit DoIHavePrediabetes.org to learn more about prediabetes. The positive message behind the campaign is that prediabetes can often be reversed by making everyday lifestyle changes. Diagnosis is key, as research shows that people who are aware of their condition are more likely to make the necessary long-term l Continue reading >>

Know Your Risk For Prediabetes | Valley Of The Sun Ymca

Know Your Risk For Prediabetes | Valley Of The Sun Ymca

American Diabetes Association Alert Day and Knowing Your Risk for Prediabetes Tuesday, March 22, is American Diabetes Association Alert Day, and the Valley of the Sun YMCA wants our community to know their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as preventive steps they can take today to reduce the chances of developing the disease. In the United States alone, diabetes affects nearly 29 million people and another 86 million Americans have prediabetes, yet only about 10 percent are aware of it. These statistics are alarming, and the impact on the cost of health care and the overall well-being of our communities makes preventing the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes more important than ever before. The nations struggle with obesity and type 2 diabetes is no surprise but the number of people with prediabetes is a growing issue, especially when only 10 percent realize they have the condition. Prediabetes is a condition in which individuals have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Often a preventable condition, people with prediabetes can reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes by adopting behavior changes that include eating healthier and increasing physical activity. People with prediabetes are at risk for not only developing type 2 diabetes, but also cardiovascular disease, stroke and other conditions. As the leading community-based provider committed to improving the nations health Valley of the Sun YMCA encourages all adults to learn their risk for type 2 diabetes by taking a risk test at www.ymca.net/diabetes . Several factors that could put a person at risk for type 2 diabetes include family history, age, weight and activity level, among others. Diabetes Alert Day is the perfect t Continue reading >>

Understanding Prediabetes - American Diabetes Association Alert Day

Understanding Prediabetes - American Diabetes Association Alert Day

Understanding Prediabetes - American Diabetes Association Alert Day The Gateway Family YMCA encourages community to understand their risks of prediabetes This post was contributed by a community member. Tuesday, March 28, is American Diabetes Association (ADA) Alert Day, and The Gateway Family YMCA wants residents of Eastern Union County and Northern Middlesex County to know their risk for prediabetes and type 2 diabetes, as well as preventive steps they can take today to reduce the chances of developing the disease. In the United States alone, diabetes affects nearly 29 million people; another 86 million Americans have prediabetes, yet only about 10 percent are aware of it. These statistics are alarming, and the impact on the cost of health care (in 2012 alone, the ADA estimates that diabetes cost the health care system $245 billion) makes preventing the number of new cases of type 2 diabetes more important than ever before. The nation's struggle with obesity and type 2 diabetes is no surprise but the number of people with prediabetes is a growing issue, especially when so few people realize they have the condition. Prediabetes is a condition in which individuals have blood glucose levels that are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Often preventable, people with prediabetes can reduce their risk for developing type 2 diabetes by adopting behavior changes that include eating healthier and increasing physical activity. People with prediabetes are at risk for not only developing type 2 diabetes, but also cardiovascular disease, stroke and other conditions. As the leading community-based network committed to improving the nation's health The Gateway Family YMCA encourages all adults to take a diabetes risk test at www.ymca.net/diabetes . Continue reading >>

Metformin For Prediabetes

Metformin For Prediabetes

This Issue The oral biguanide metformin (Glucophage, and others) is generally the drug of choice for initial treatment of type 2 diabetes. It has also been used to prevent or at least delay the onset of diabetes in patients considered to be at high risk for the disease. Recent guidelines recommend considering use of metformin in patients with prediabetes (fasting plasma glucose 100-125 mg/dL, 2-hr post-load glucose 140-199 mg/dL, or A1C 5.7-6.4%), especially in those who are <60 years old, have a BMI >35 kg/m2, or have a history of gestational diabetes.1 Metformin has not been approved for such use by the FDA. Continue reading >>

How To Prevent And Treat Prediabetes

How To Prevent And Treat Prediabetes

Zinkevych/Thinkstock (woman); Wand_Prapan/Thinkstock (apple); psphotograph/Thinkstock (pen) Do you have prediabetes? Are you sure? About one-third of adults over the age of 18 have the condition, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC). And about 90 percent of those people dont know they have it. Theres good news, though. If youre aware of your prediabetes, you can prevent it from progressing, and can even reverse it. Heres what you need to know in order to stay healthy. When you eat foods containing carbohydrates, your digestive system breaks them down into glucose that enters your bloodstream. If your body is working as it should, beta cells in the pancreas produce insulin, a hormone that helps cells absorb the glucose and use it for energy. As the cells drink up the glucose, blood glucose levels fall. Sometimes, though, the cells dont properly respond to insulina condition called insulin resistanceand the body has to produce extra insulin in order for the cells to absorb glucose. Over time, the pancreas becomes unable to keep up with the increased demand for insulin, and excess glucose builds up in the bloodstream. The result: prediabetes or type 2 diabetes , depending on how high blood glucose is compared to normal (see Testing for Prediabetes, below). The biggest risk factors for prediabetes are a body mass index (BMI, a ratio of weight to height used to estimate how close a person is to a healthy weight) over 25, being over 45 years old, and having an immediate relative with type 2 diabetes. Every one of us has a Venn diagram where age, genetics, and body weight converge to lead to diabetes, says Leigh Perreault, MD, associate professor of medicine at the University of Colorado in Aurora, Colorado. People who exercise fewer than three ti Continue reading >>

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

So...do I Have Prediabetes?

With a little exercise and a change in diet, it often can be reversed. Let's face it, there are millions of reasons why we don't find the time to make healthy lifestyle choices. Kids, jobs, cat videos on the Internet — we're busy. But whatever your reason, prediabetes is real. So find out if you have prediabetes by taking the test now. You won't regret it. Join the National DPP You're not alone in this. There are hundreds of Diabetes Prevention Programs in local communities that are proven to help people with prediabetes make lifestyle changes to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. We're sure there's one that's right for you. "But I'm a busy mom...I don't have time to eat right and exercise!" Yes, making lifestyle changes may seem hard. But it doesn’t have to be. In fact, some of them can even be fun. Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: The Epidemic That Never Was, And Shouldn't Be

Prediabetes: The Epidemic That Never Was, And Shouldn't Be

(Nam Y. Huh / AP) This summer, your TV will begin alerting you to the dangers of high blood sugar. Your phone will buzz with automatic messages assessing the glycemic index of your breakfast bagel. And your Facebook feed will remind you to take the stairs, not the elevator. This is all the result of a recent initiative intended to increase awareness of a condition known as prediabetes. Marked by abnormal but not yet pathological blood sugar levels, prediabetes acts as a risk marker for Type 2 diabetes, a metabolic disease in which the body fails to properly process sugar. The idea is akin to cancer prevention: catch the tumor early (prediabetes) and avoid metastasis (diabetes). According to the most recent Centers for Disease Control and Prevention numbers, prediabetes is becoming a national emergency. In 2014, 86 million adult Americans were said to be prediabetic. This means that 1 in 3 American adults have prediabetes — a figure higher than the number of Americans who currently hold a bachelor's degree. Yet those claims may be scaring more people than they are helping. The United States has the lowest prediabetes cut-off points of high-income countries around the world, meaning that prediabetes gets diagnosed earlier and more frequently, leading to new patients and higher costs. In 2003, and then again in 2010, the American Diabetes Association shifted the prediabetes diagnostic threshold down, from 110 to 100 milligrams per deciliter for the finger-stick glucose test, and from 6.0 to 5.7 percent for the average blood sugar level (the HbA1C test). Other countries have pushed back. So has the World Health Organization, which has cautioned since 2006 that lower thresholds would needlessly double the prevalence of prediabetes and inadvertently implicate patients at mi Continue reading >>

Pre Diabetes

Pre Diabetes

Diabetes & Related Conditions – Pre Diabetes When you have pre–diabetes, your blood sugar (glucose) is higher than normal, but not high enough to be considered diabetes. The problem is that this condition puts you at a higher risk of getting diabetes. Diabetes is more than a “touch of sugar.” It is a serious disease that can negatively affect your health in many ways. Today over 25 million Americans have diabetes. But even greater numbers of Americans have pre–diabetes. And the numbers continue to grow. Is it a new condition? Pre–diabetes is a new name for an old condition. It used to be called “impaired glucose tolerance” (IGT) or “impaired fasting glucose” (IFG). These terms also mean that blood glucose levels are a bit raised. We know much more about this condition today. Pre-diabetes is a health problem Having pre–diabetes means you are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. About half the people who have pre–diabetes, develop type 2 diabetes within 10 years. But even pre–diabetes can have bad effects on your health. For example, people with pre–diabetes have 1.5 times more risk of heart and blood vessel disease. This includes high blood pressure, stroke, and heart attack. Diabetes can be prevented When you have pre–diabetes and make lifestyle changes, it is possible to prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. In a national study called the Diabetes Prevention Program, doctors looked at a large number of overweight people who were at high risk for diabetes. Here is what they found: Losing weight and being physically active can prevent or delay type 2 diabetes. How likely am I to get pre-diabetes? The same risk factors increase your chances of getting pre–diabetes or diabetes. You are more likely to get pre–diabetes or diabetes if you Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes is the precursor stage before diabetes mellitus in which not all of the symptoms required to diagnose diabetes are present, but blood sugar is abnormally high. This stage is often referred to as the "grey area."[1] It is not a disease; the American Diabetes Association says,[2] "Prediabetes should not be viewed as a clinical entity in its own right but rather as an increased risk for diabetes and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Prediabetes is associated with obesity (especially abdominal or visceral obesity), dyslipidemia with high triglycerides and/or low HDL cholesterol, and hypertension."[2] It is thus a metabolic diathesis or syndrome, and it usually involves no symptoms and only high blood sugar as the sole sign. Impaired fasting blood sugar and impaired glucose tolerance are two forms of prediabetes that are similar in clinical definition (glucose levels too high for their context) but are physiologically distinct.[3] Insulin resistance, the insulin resistance syndrome (metabolic syndrome or syndrome X), and prediabetes are closely related to one another and have overlapping aspects. Classification[edit] Impaired fasting glucose[edit] Main article: Impaired fasting glycaemia Impaired fasting glycaemia or impaired fasting glucose (IFG) refers to a condition in which the fasting blood glucose or the 3-month average blood glucose (A1C) is elevated above what is considered normal levels but is not high enough to be classified as diabetes mellitus. It is considered a pre-diabetic state, associated with insulin resistance and increased risk of cardiovascular pathology, although of lesser risk than impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). IFG sometimes progresses to type 2 diabetes mellitus. There is a 50% risk over 10 years of progressing to overt diabetes. Many newl Continue reading >>

You’re ‘prediabetic’? Join The Club

You’re ‘prediabetic’? Join The Club

“The numbers don’t lie,” said the home page at doihaveprediabetes.org. “1 in 3 American adults has prediabetes.” The website invited me to take an online risk test, promising that it would require only a minute. The widely promoted site, part of a yearlong media campaign, bore the logos of the American Medical Association, the American Diabetes Association and the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention. About 292,000 people have taken the test. Make that 292,001. I clicked on the yellow button and gave my gender, race and age range. I responded to a couple of questions about family history and my own medical history, said that I was physically active, and filled in my height and weight. How did I do? “Based on these results, you’re likely to have prediabetes and are at high risk for Type 2 diabetes.” The site advised me to see my doctor for a blood test to confirm the results. I would be more worried about this if I hadn’t just read a new analysis in JAMA Internal Medicine. I’m in good company: The study found that more than 80 percent of Americans over age 60 would get the same warning. So would nearly 60 percent of those over age 40, an estimated 73.3 million people. The researchers, at Tufts Medical Center in Boston, used data from 10,175 participants in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. Because Type 2 diabetes is a major and growing public health problem, experts certainly do want to help people avoid it. But how useful or meaningful is a test that identifies nearly every older person as likely to have prediabetes? As an accompanying editorial pointed out, it’s “a condition never heard of 10 years ago.” To the lead author, Dr. Saeid Shahraz, a specialist in predictive analysis and comparative effectiveness, the test Continue reading >>

Prediabetes Diagnosis And Treatment: A Review

Prediabetes Diagnosis And Treatment: A Review

Go to: Abstract Prediabetes is an intermediate state of hyperglycemia with glycemic parameters above normal but below the diabetes threshold. While, the diagnostic criteria of prediabetes are not uniform across various international professional organizations, it remains a state of high risk for developing diabetes with yearly conversion rate of 5%-10%. Observational evidence suggests as association between prediabetes and complications of diabetes such early nephropathy, small fiber neuropathy, early retinopathy and risk of macrovascular disease. Several studies have shown efficacy of lifestyle interventions with regards to diabetes prevention with a relative risk reduction of 40%-70% in adults with prediabetes. While there is increasing evidence to prove the efficacy of pharmacotherapy in prevention of diabetes in adults with prediabetes, pharmaceutical treatment options other than metformin are associated with adverse effects that limit their use for prediabetes. There are no reports of systematic evaluation of health outcomes related to prediabetes in children. The effects of pharmacotherapy of prediabetes on growth and pubertal development in children remains unknown. Secondary intervention with pharmacotherapy with metformin is advocated for high-risk individuals but criteria for such consideration benefit of early intervention, long term cost effectiveness of such interventions and the end point of therapy remain unclear. Pharmacotherapy must be used with caution in children with prediabetes. Prediabetes is a condition defined as having blood glucose levels above normal but below the defined threshold of diabetes. It is considered to be an at risk state, with high chances of developing diabetes. While, prediabetes is commonly an asymptomatic condition, there is a Continue reading >>

Prediabetes: What’s The Big Deal?

Prediabetes: What’s The Big Deal?

If you’re reading this right now, there’s a good chance you know something about type 1 or type 2 diabetes. But how much do you know about prediabetes? If your answer is “not a lot,” keep reading! Before people develop type 2 diabetes, they almost always have “prediabetes”—blood glucose levels that are higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed as diabetes. There are 79 million people in the United States who have prediabetes—that’s one in three American adults. Having prediabetes means you are at high risk for developing type 2 diabetes. And prediabetes is dangerous on its own because it increases your risk for heart disease and other diabetes-related complications. Many people don’t even realize they have prediabetes, as there are no clear symptoms. So how do you know? The same way regular diabetes is diagnosed: by having a measured blood test at your doctor’s office. The same tests are used to diagnose prediabetes as diabetes. There are three different tests that can be used to screen for prediabetes or diabetes. Results indicating prediabetes include: An A1C of 5.7 to 6.4 percent (this is a measure of your average blood glucose over the last two to three months) Fasting blood glucose of 100 to 125 mg/dl An oral glucose tolerance test (a two-hour test that checks your blood glucose levels before and two hours after you drink a special sweet drink) of 140 to 199 mg/dl You will not develop type 2 diabetes automatically if you have prediabetes. For some people with prediabetes, early treatment can actually return blood glucose levels to the normal range. No matter what, being diagnosed with prediabetes is an opportunity to make sure you’re leading the healthiest life possible. Making some lifestyle changes can help send prediabete Continue reading >>

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One Third Of Americans Are Headed For Diabetes, And They Don't Even Know It

One third of Americans may be on their way to developing full-blown type 2 diabetes, and most of them don't even know it. A recent report from The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) shows that more than 84 million Americans, or roughly one-third of the population, have prediabetes, a condition marked by higher-than-normal blood sugar. Of that group, 90 percent aren't aware they have the condition. The primary risk factors for type 2 diabetes are genetics and lifestyle — excess weight, obesity and lack of exercise contribute to this alarming medical trend. "People with prediabetes who don't change their lifestyle are at a much higher risk of developing heart disease and stroke and can develop type 2 diabetes within five years if left untreated," said William T. Cefalu, MD, chief scientific, medical & mission officer of the American Diabetes Association. The health risks go beyond heart disease and stroke. As diabetes worsens over time, blindness, kidney disease and lower-limb amputation are also major health risks. Diabetes was the seventh-leading cause of death in the United States in 2015, according to the CDC. This population of diabetes "ticking time bombs" is particularly alarming, because in many cases type 2 diabetes can be avoided, simply by leading a healthy lifestyle. Type 2 diabetes is often progressive, and within 10 years of diagnosis, 50 percent of individuals need to use insulin to control their blood glucose levels, according to the ADA. More than 30 million Americans — 9.4 percent of the U.S. population — are already battling diabetes, according to the CDC's National Diabetes Statistics Report, which used data through 2015. The CDC found that of those cases, 7.2 million were undiagnosed. "The country needs to take this seriously, ratc Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

What Is Prediabetes? Prediabetes is a “pre-diagnosis” of diabetes—you can think of it as a warning sign. It’s when your blood glucose level (blood sugar level) is higher than normal, but it’s not high enough to be considered diabetes. Prediabetes is an indication that you could develop type 2 diabetes if you don’t make some lifestyle changes. But here's the good news: . Eating healthy food, losing weight and staying at a healthy weight, and being physically active can help you bring your blood glucose level back into the normal range. Diabetes develops very gradually, so when you’re in the prediabetes stage—when your blood glucose level is higher than it should be—you may not have any symptoms at all. You may, however, notice that: you’re hungrier than normal you’re losing weight, despite eating more you’re thirstier than normal you have to go to the bathroom more frequently you’re more tired than usual All of those are typical symptoms associated with diabetes, so if you’re in the early stages of diabetes, you may notice them. Prediabetes develops when your body begins to have trouble using the hormone insulin. Insulin is necessary to transport glucose—what your body uses for energy—into the cells via the bloodstream. In pre-diabetes, your body either doesn’t make enough insulin or it doesn’t use it well (that’s called insulin resistance). If you don’t have enough insulin or if you’re insulin resistant, you can build up too much glucose in your blood, leading to a higher-than-normal blood glucose level and perhaps prediabetes. Researchers aren’t sure what exactly causes the insulin process to go awry in some people. There are several risk factors, though, that make it more likely that you’ll develop pre-diabetes. These are Continue reading >>

Prediabetes

Prediabetes

Prediabetes means you have blood glucose, or blood sugar, levels that are higher than normal but not high enough to be called diabetes. Glucose comes from the foods you eat. Too much glucose in your blood can damage your body over time. If you have prediabetes, you are more likely to develop type 2 diabetes, heart disease, and stroke. Most people with prediabetes don't have any symptoms. Your doctor can use an A1C test or another blood test to find out if your blood glucose levels are higher than normal. If you are 45 years old or older, your doctor may recommend that you be tested for prediabetes, especially if you are overweight. Losing weight - at least 5 to 10 percent of your starting weight - can prevent or delay diabetes or even reverse prediabetes. That's 10 to 20 pounds for someone who weighs 200 pounds. You can lose weight by cutting down on the amount of calories and fat you eat and being physically active at least 30 minutes a day. Being physically active makes your body's insulin work better. Your doctor may also prescribe medicine to help control the amount of glucose in your blood. NIH: National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases Continue reading >>

More in diabetes