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American Diabetes Association Mission Statement

The American Diabetes Associations Vision Is A Life Free Of Diabetes And Its Burdens.

The American Diabetes Associations Vision Is A Life Free Of Diabetes And Its Burdens.

The American Diabetes Associations vision is a life free of diabetes and its burdens. For more than 75 years, millions of Americans with diabetes have relied on the American Diabetes Association (ADA). Their mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. ADA is the trusted global authority on diabetes as a powerful organization committed to leading the fight against diabetes and its deadly consequences. ADA is made up of thought leaders, researchers, advocates, health care professionals, people with diabetes, their family and friendseveryone committed to fighting diabetesworking together. Diabetes is a common disease, yet every individual needs unique care.Those with diabetes and their families are encouraged to learn as much as possible about the latest medical approaches,as well as healthy lifestyle choices. Good communication with a team of experts can help you feel in control and respond to changing needs. Diabetes is a problem with your body that causes blood glucose (sugar) levels to rise higher than normal. This is also called hyperglycemia. Type 2 diabetes is the most common form of diabetes. If you have type 2 diabetes your body does not use insulin properly. This is called insulin resistance. At first, your pancreas makes extra insulin to make up for it. But, over time it isn't able to keep up and can't make enough insulin to keep your blood glucose at normal levels. Diabetes is a journey and the American Diabetes Association is ready to be with you every step of the way! If you or someone you know is recently diagnosed with diabetes, you can enroll in the free Living With Type 2 Diabetes program to get information and support at www.diabetes.org/living Are you at risk for type 2 diabetes? Take action now Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association American Diabetes Association

American Diabetes Association American Diabetes Association

Here's a sample of our volunteer opportunities: Our mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The American Diabetes Association is the only non-profit organization supporting all 25.8 million Americans living with diabetes. The Association funds research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes; delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides objective and credible information; and gives voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. What is Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes?Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes is the American Diabetes Association's signature fundraising walk. With strong support from the business community including sponsorship and corporate teams, this event raises over $20 million (nationally) to find a cure for diabetes and to support our mission. How can I participate in Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes? You can form a walk team, participate as an individual walker or as a member of a walk team. Take your first step and register today . What is involved in participating in Step Out: Walk to Stop Diabetes? Participants register and recruit friends or co-workers to walk and raise money. The day of the event is a party to celebrate the fundraising accomplishments of our teams and individual participants as well as an opportunity to promote awareness about diabetes and the American Diabetes Association. Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association

American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a United States-based association working to fight the consequences of diabetes and to help those affected by diabetes. The association funds research to manage, cure and prevent diabetes (including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and pre-diabetes); delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides information for both patients and health care professionals; and advocates on behalf of people denied their rights because of diabetes. History and mission[edit] Formed in 1940, the ADA was founded by 28 physicians.[1] During its first 30 years, the association limited its membership to physicians, health professionals and corporations. In 1970, the association underwent a reorganization during which membership was expanded to include general members. Now the ADA is a volunteer-driven organization based in Alexandria, Virginia, with about 90 local offices across the United States.[2] The mission of the ADA is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.[3] To fulfill this mission, the association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and the public. The association is also actively involved in advocating for scientific research and for the rights of people with diabetes.[3] The association acts on its mission through a number of critical programs and activities that are directed to a broad range of constituents, including consumers, research scientists, health care professionals, corporations and communities. In 1994, the Chronicle of Philanthropy, an industry publication, study showed that the American Diabetes Association was ranked as the 18th "most Continue reading >>

The American Association Of Diabetes Educators And The American Diabetes Association® Issue 2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

The American Association Of Diabetes Educators And The American Diabetes Association® Issue 2017 National Standards For Diabetes Self-management Education And Support

ARLINGTON, Va. (July 28, 2017) — Diabetes is a highly complex disease that requires continuous daily care to effectively manage blood glucose levels and to help reduce and avoid deadly and costly complications. Therefore, diabetes self-management education and support (DSMES), is a vital component of care for all people with diabetes, as well as for people who are at risk for developing diabetes. According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention’s most recent estimates, 30.3 million people in the U.S. are living with diabetes—23.1 million people with diagnosed diabetes and another 7.2 million people who are believed to be living with undiagnosed diabetes—and 84 million people are at increased risk for developing type 2 diabetes[1]. The American Association of Diabetes Educators (AADE) and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) are publishing the “2017 National Standards for Diabetes Self-Management Education and Support” (Standards). The detailed recommendations, which are updated regularly, will be published online on July 28, 2017, and in the September 2017 issues The Diabetes Educator and Diabetes Care. DSMES focuses on the ongoing process of providing patients and caregivers with the knowledge, skills and abilities that are necessary for prediabetes and diabetes self-care. Additionally, DSMES includes activities that assist a person with diabetes in implementing and sustaining the behaviors needed to manage his or her condition on an ongoing basis. The Standards outline and define evidence-based, specific guidelines to help diabetes educators and medical providers establish and sustain patient care models, programs and teams for people with diabetes and their caregivers. The Standards were last updated in 2012 with diabetes self-management sup Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Issues Diabetic Retinopathy Position Statement

American Diabetes Association Issues Diabetic Retinopathy Position Statement

American Diabetes Association Issues Diabetic Retinopathy Position Statement Updated recommendations include new diagnostic technology and treatment guidelines ARLINGTON, Va., Feb. 21, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- Diabetes affects the entire body and can result in long-term complications, including damage to the small blood vessels. Such damage can lead to problems in the retina of the eye, a condition known as diabetic retinopathy. The American Diabetes Association (Association) has issued updated guidelines on prevention, assessment and treatment of diabetic retinopathy for providers and for people with diabetes. The detailed recommendations are featured in the article, "Diabetic Retinopathy: A Position Statement by the American Diabetes Association," to be published in the March 2017 issue of Diabetes Care , and online on February 21, 2017. The position statement includes information on advancements in diabetic retinopathy assessment and treatment methods, as well as improvements in managing diabetes that have developed since its prior diabetic retinopathy position statement in 2002. New diagnostic developments include the widespread adoption of optical coherence tomography, as well as intraretinal pathology and wide-eld fundus photography. Newer treatment modalities, including intravitreous injection of antivascular endothelial growth factor agents, are also outlined in the statement. "Diabetic retinopathy is actually the most common cause of new cases of blindness in adults who live in developed countries and are between the ages of 20 and 74," said Thomas W. Gardner, MD, MS, corresponding author of the article and professor of ophthalmology and visual sciences at the Kellogg Eye Center at the University of Michigan. "Over the past decade, new research and sign Continue reading >>

Definition Of American Diabetes Association (ada)

Definition Of American Diabetes Association (ada)

Medical Definition of American Diabetes Association (ADA) American Diabetes Association (ADA): The American Diabetes Association (ADA) provides the following introduction: "The American Diabetes Association is the nation's leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy. Founded in 1940, it was reorganized in 1969 to increase its ability to serve the public. Today, offices in more than 800 communities conduct programs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. "The mission of the organization is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, and provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health care professionals and the public." The statement quoted above is from the ADA internet site (www.diabetes.org) which contains much useful and reliable information concerning diabetes. Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association: Mission & Funding

American Diabetes Association: Mission & Funding

Our Mission: To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The money you raise for the Association funds critical diabetes research, information programs, and advocacy efforts that support the nearly 30 million children and adults in the U.S. with diabetes, and the 86 million with pre-diabetes. The American Diabetes Association meets or exceeds relevant watchdog standards in its allocation of donor dollars. According to the Better Business Bureau Wise Giving Alliance, nonprofit organizations should spend at least 65 percent of their total expenses on program activities, with remaining funds going to administrative and fundraising expenses. The American Diabetes Association continues to meet and exceed these minimum standards with 73 percent of our total annual expenses going to research, information and advocacy. Learn more about the BBB and its report on the American Diabetes Association's Web site. Since its inception, the Association has invested more than $700 million in research and provided funding for more than 4,500 research projects. The Association continues to be the largest provider of Diabetes Camps as well as weekend retreats and one-day events that benefit more than 6,500 children of all ages each year. $500,000 in "camperships" was awarded to children to attend summer diabetes camps. The Association's programs and workshops for high-risk populations give individuals, families, schools and communitys critical guidance and culturally competent tools and resources to help those affected by diabetes take control. The Center for Information and Community Support fielded an average of 20,000 calls and emails per month in 2011 to support all people with diabetes, particularly providing a great resource for the newly Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.guidestar.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.224.54.53 on 2018-01-04 15:46:07 UTC. Trace: d07052c8-00b3-4b24-b431-ca2ab7ede72a via 35a9edc9-dac9-459f-8854-dc3ec5d9864f Continue reading >>

Central Ohio Diabetes Association > About Us

Central Ohio Diabetes Association > About Us

Founded by a group of local physicians, the Central Ohio Diabetes Association has provided service to the Central Ohio community for over 50 years. The Central Ohio Diabetes Association is an agency of LifeCare Alliance, since a 2016 merger. The Central Ohio Diabetes Association helps Central Ohioans living with diabetes detect their condition, prevent onset and complications, and learn to live well with the challenge of diabetes. The Central Ohio Diabetes Association provides the following services to all individuals, regardless of ability to pay: Community outreach programs to high-risk populations How is the Central Ohio Diabetes Association Unique? The Central Ohio Diabetes Association is the only community-based organization providing diabetes education services provided by a staff of Certified Diabetes Educators, dietitians and licensed social workers to all individuals regardless of ability to pay. The agency offers one of only a few American Diabetes Association Recognized diabetes education programs in Central Ohio. One hundred percent of the funding comes from this community and remains in this community to provide services to local people. Since 1964, Donors have played a significant role in sustaining the longevity of the Central Ohio Diabetes Association Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association | National Eye Institute

American Diabetes Association | National Eye Institute

American Diabetes Association Hours of operation are MondayFriday, 8:30 AM-8 PM Eastern Standard Time. The American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and the public. Contact ADA for diabetes-related questions or to request a diabetes information packet. Spanish language consumerwebsite. To prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association (ADA) perform the following: Funds and advocates for scientific research to prevent, cure, and managediabetes. Fights for the rights of people withdiabetes. Provides information and services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and thepublic. The Association acts on its mission through a number of critical programs and activities that are directed to a broad range of constituents encompassing consumers, research scientists, healthcare professionals, corporations, andcommunities. Pinterest: ADA has more than 1 million volunteers, including a membership of 445,000 diabetes patients and their families, as well as a professional society of more than 14,000 health and medicalprofessionals. Research activities involve learning more about the causes of diabetes, treatment, factors leading to complications, and, ultimately, a cure. Information activities address improving the quality of life for people with diabetes by providing educational programs and publications; informing the public about the risk factors, the warning signs, and the seriousness of diabetes; and keeping health professionals up-to-date on the latest developments in diabetes treatment through professional education progra Continue reading >>

Impact Statement: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Impact Statement: Stop Diabetes American Diabetes Association

Our mission, to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes, is illustrated in everything we do. For the nearly 26 million people living with diabetes, the 79 million people who have prediabetes and are at increased risk, and the family members who love and care for people with diabetes, the American Diabetes Association works tirelessly every day to provide valuable programs and lifesaving resources, while at the same time never losing focus on the search for a cure. Life free of diabetes and all its burdens is the vision that guides the work of the American Diabetes Association. Our programs and resources are far-reaching and touch the lives of all who are affected by diabetes as we lead the nation in a movement to Stop Diabetes. The American Diabetes Associations impact in the fight to Stop Diabetes can be felt on every corner in every community. From backyards to schoolyards, from research laboratories to health care providers offices and from diagnosis to beyond, we are fighting to make sure that individuals, children, and families across the country have the resources they need. The Association answers the call and provides valuable information for those who love and care for people with diabetes. The Association educates health care providers who are seeking the latest standards in diabetes care so they can provide the best care for their patients. We are the worlds scientific authority on diabetes care, working to ensure that people with all types of diabetes, and those at risk, have access to the care they need to stay healthy. As the voice for people who have, or are at risk for diabetes, the American Diabetes Association pays attention to whats happening on Capitol Hill, while also keeping an eye on the needs of indi Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Extremely Disappointed And Saddened By Comments About People With Diabetes From White House Office Of Management And Budget Director Mick Mulvaney

American Diabetes Association Extremely Disappointed And Saddened By Comments About People With Diabetes From White House Office Of Management And Budget Director Mick Mulvaney

American Diabetes Association Extremely Disappointed and Saddened by Comments About People with Diabetes from White House Office of Management and Budget Director Mick Mulvaney ARLINGTON, Va., May 12, 2017 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- On behalf of the nearly 30 million Americans living with diabetes, the American Diabetes Association is extremely disappointed by the misinformed statement of Mick Mulvaney, director of the White House Office of Management and Budget, as reported by The Washington Examiner . Mr. Mulvaney's comments perpetuate the stigma that one chooses to have diabetes based on his/her lifestyle. We are also deeply troubled by his assertion that access to health care should be rationed or denied to anyone. All of the scientific evidence indicates that diabetes develops from a diverse set of risk factors, genetics being a primary cause. People with diabetes need access to affordable health care in order to effectively manage their disease and prevent dangerous and costly complications. Nobody should be denied coverage or charged more based on their health status. We are saddened by Mr. Mulvaney's comments, and we look forward to working closely with the White House and the Department of Health and Human Services to dispel the erroneous stigma around diabetes and the millions of Americans living with this disease. More than 29 million Americans have diabetes, and every 23 seconds, another person is diagnosed with diabetes. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Association (Association) is the nation's leading voluntary health organization whose mission is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. The Association drives discovery by funding research to treat, manage and prevent all types of diabetes, as well a Continue reading >>

Mission Impact: Letters From The Presidents

Mission Impact: Letters From The Presidents

Mission Impact: Letters from the Presidents Posted on January 31, 2018 by American Diabetes Association This year, were proud to welcome Felicia Hill-Briggs, PhD, ABPP and Jane E. B. Reusch, MD to ADA. As President, Health Care & Education and President, Medicine & Science, respectively, theyll continue to further our mission and support all people living with and affected by diabetes. Learn how they plan to do this, in their own words: Letter from the President, Health Care & Education I am tremendously honored to serve as the 2018 President of Health Care & Education. This is an era both of great challenge and great opportunity. As a health care professional and a researcher, I, like many of you, have witnessed the astounding evolution of diabetes treatments, devices, educational standards, and models of care delivery on one hand, and the realities of suboptimal access, reach, quality, and affordability on the other. Over my four decades of living with type 1 diabetes, I have also personally observed the inequities in care among population subgroups and the variability in diabetes quality of care among geographic regions and practices. More than ever, ADA is needed to help ensure the health of the population with and at risk for diabetes, its comorbidities, and complications. A population health perspective provides a unifying lens through which to view the scope of challenge and opportunity for the ADA. Population health improvement strategies expand quality services and education beyond the health care setting through multisector and community partnerships. Population health maps pathways to measurable gains in the next decade and beyond through proactive, coordinated strategies for diabetes management, prevention, and equity. During my year of presidency, I am lea Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Takes Issue With Acps Blood Sugar Targets

American Diabetes Association Takes Issue With Acps Blood Sugar Targets

American Diabetes Association takes issue with ACPs blood sugar targets The American Diabetes Association (ADA) released a statement March 8 in response to the American College of Physicians (ACP) guidance statement on blood glucose targets, saying it is deeply concerned with the recommendations . ACP president Jack Ende, MD, summarized that most patients with type 2 diabetes should be treated to a hemoglobin A1C target between 7 and 8 percent because it will best balance long-term benefits with harms such as low blood sugar, medication burden, and costs. But the ADA said a reasonable A1C goal is less than 7 percent for many nonpregnant adults based on evidence from four international clinical trials. There should be no lower limit on A1C targets as long as there is minimal risk of hypoglycemia, the ADA contends. The ADA believes all people diagnosed with type 2 diabetes can be healthy and should have the opportunity to reduce their risk of serious diabetes complications through appropriate blood glucose targets, said William T. Cefalu, MD, the ADAs chief scientific, medical and mission officer. Individualization of targets is the key factor in designing the most appropriate regimen for patients with type 2 diabetes. However, by lumping most people with type 2 diabetes into a 7 to 8 percent target range, ACPs new guidance could cause increased complication rates for those who may safely benefit from lower evidence-based targets. The ADA said newer medications such as SGLT2 inhibitors and GLP-1 receptor agonists have a low risk of hypoglycemia and may help clinicians reach lower A1C targets without complications. The organization also took issue with the ACPs recommendation that clinicians seek to alleviate symptoms rather than hit specific A1C targets in patients with Continue reading >>

Charity Report - American Diabetes Association - Give.org

Charity Report - American Diabetes Association - Give.org

Oversight of Operations and Staff: Standard 1 Organizations shall have a board of directors that provides adequate oversight of the charity's operations and its staff. Indication of adequate oversight includes, but is not limited to, regularly scheduled appraisals of the CEO's performance, evidence of disbursement controls such as board approval of the budget, fund raising practices, establishment of a conflict of interest policy, and establishment of accounting procedures sufficient to safeguard charity finances. Soliciting organizations shall have a board of directors with a minimum of five voting members. Frequency and Attendance of Board Meetings: Standard 3 An organization shall have a minimum of three evenly spaced meetings per year of the full governing body with a majority in attendance, with face-to-face participation. A conference call of the full board can substitute for one of the three meetings of the governing body. For all meetings, alternative modes of participation are acceptable for those with physical disabilities. Not more than one or 10% (whichever is greater) directly or indirectly compensated person(s) serving as voting member(s) of the board. Compensated members shall not serve as the board's chair or treasurer. No transaction(s) in which any board or staff members have material conflicting interests with the charity resulting from any relationship or business affiliation. Factors that will be considered when concluding whether or not a related party transaction constitutes a conflict of interest and if such a conflict is material, include, but are not limited to: any arm's length procedures established by the charity; the size of the transaction relative to like expenses of the charity; whether the interested party participated in the board vot Continue reading >>

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