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American Diabetes Association History

The History Of A Wonderful Thing We Call Insulin

The History Of A Wonderful Thing We Call Insulin

Since the dawn of time, we have searched for ways to make life easier for us. The modern age has given us some amazing technological advances—what we would do without the internet, our iPhones or high-speed travel? For many people, surviving life without these things sounds rough. However, if you have diabetes, no doubt you’re also a big fan of one particular 20th-century discovery: insulin. Before insulin was discovered in 1921, people with diabetes didn’t live for long; there wasn’t much doctors could do for them. The most effective treatment was to put patients with diabetes on very strict diets with minimal carbohydrate intake. This could buy patients a few extra years but couldn’t save them. Harsh diets (some prescribed as little as 450 calories a day!) sometimes even caused patients to die of starvation. So how did this wonderful breakthrough blossom? Let’s travel back a little more than 100 years ago.… In 1889, two German researchers, Oskar Minkowski and Joseph von Mering, found that when the pancreas gland was removed from dogs, the animals developed symptoms of diabetes and died soon afterward. This led to the idea that the pancreas was the site where “pancreatic substances” (insulin) were produced. Later experimenters narrowed this search to the islets of Langerhans (a fancy name for clusters of specialized cells in the pancreas). In 1910, Sir Edward Albert Sharpey-Shafer suggested only one chemical was missing from the pancreas in people with diabetes. He decided to call this chemical insulin, which comes for the Latin word insula, meaning “island.” So what happened next? Something truly miraculous. In 1921, a young surgeon named Frederick Banting and his assistant Charles Best figured out how to remove insulin from a dog’s pancreas. S Continue reading >>

Highlights From The American Diabetes Association's 2017 Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes For Osteopathic Physicians

Highlights From The American Diabetes Association's 2017 Standards Of Medical Care In Diabetes For Osteopathic Physicians

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) updates its Standards of Medical Care (SOMC) in Diabetes annually. These ADA standards make up a comprehensive document that serves as an excellent resource for clinical care. The current article comes from the ADA's Primary Care Advisory Group. This article highlights key aspects of the SOMC that are relevant to the day-to-day practice of osteopathic primary care physicians. It is not intended to replace the full SOMC but will refer to the master document for further explanation and evidence-based support. Continue reading >>

Pardon Our Interruption...

Pardon Our Interruption...

As you were browsing www.guidestar.org something about your browser made us think you were a bot. There are a few reasons this might happen: You're a power user moving through this website with super-human speed. You've disabled JavaScript in your web browser. A third-party browser plugin, such as Ghostery or NoScript, is preventing JavaScript from running. Additional information is available in this support article. To request an unblock, please fill out the form below and we will review it as soon as possible. You reached this page when attempting to access from 35.224.54.53 on 2018-01-04 15:46:07 UTC. Trace: d07052c8-00b3-4b24-b431-ca2ab7ede72a via 35a9edc9-dac9-459f-8854-dc3ec5d9864f Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association

American Diabetes Association

The American Diabetes Association (ADA) is a United States-based association working to fight the consequences of diabetes and to help those affected by diabetes. The association funds research to manage, cure and prevent diabetes (including type 1 diabetes, type 2 diabetes, gestational diabetes, and pre-diabetes); delivers services to hundreds of communities; provides information for both patients and health care professionals; and advocates on behalf of people denied their rights because of diabetes. History and mission[edit] Formed in 1940, the ADA was founded by 28 physicians.[1] During its first 30 years, the association limited its membership to physicians, health professionals and corporations. In 1970, the association underwent a reorganization during which membership was expanded to include general members. Now the ADA is a volunteer-driven organization based in Alexandria, Virginia, with about 90 local offices across the United States.[2] The mission of the ADA is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes.[3] To fulfill this mission, the association funds research, publishes scientific findings, provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health professionals and the public. The association is also actively involved in advocating for scientific research and for the rights of people with diabetes.[3] The association acts on its mission through a number of critical programs and activities that are directed to a broad range of constituents, including consumers, research scientists, health care professionals, corporations and communities. In 1994, the Chronicle of Philanthropy, an industry publication, study showed that the American Diabetes Association was ranked as the 18th "most Continue reading >>

Dr. Cecil Striker, An Essential Founder Of The Ada

Dr. Cecil Striker, An Essential Founder Of The Ada

Dr. Cecil Striker, An Essential Founder of the ADA Dr. Cecil Striker, after the International Diabetes Clinic (Indiana University). This photo serves as a link to the finding aid for the Winkler Centers collection on Dr. Cecil Striker. Dr. Cecil Strikers intense professional passion for Diabetes research began during his one-year residency, which had itselfbegan in 1923 at the recently finished Cincinnati General Hospital.The first full-time Professor of Endocrinologyat the Medical College, Dr. Roger Sylvester Morris, had assigned Striker the task of testing a fairly new medication received from the Eli Lilly Company (Indianapolis) a drug named insulin! Insulin and its medical application had only just been discovered about a year earlier. A cartoon of Dr. Roger Sylvester Morris. This image serves as a link to the blog, Magnifying the Past: The Alsfelder Faculty Caricatures. This cartoon and others like it were originally obtained by Dr. Striker. Diabetes was the absorbing professional field for the rest of Cecils life; he became nationally and internationally known as a consultant to physicians caring for patients with this disease. And, it seems almost natural that, with his talent for organizing things, Cecil should have been the motivating force for the founding of the American Diabetes Association. (from page 1 of Memorial Resolution for Cecil Striker, M.D.) Truly,despite the game changing scientific discovery of insulin and itssignificant medicinal application, Dr. Striker is correct whenhe explains that itwas not a breakthrough of science, but rather the dedication of several medical professions which brought about the founding of the ADA Dr. Striker most certainly among them! In fact, not only was Dr. Striker an essential contributor to the formation of the ADA Continue reading >>

Validation Of The Diabetes Screening Tools Proposed By The American Diabetes Association In An Aging Chinese Population

Validation Of The Diabetes Screening Tools Proposed By The American Diabetes Association In An Aging Chinese Population

Click through the PLOS taxonomy to find articles in your field. For more information about PLOS Subject Areas, click here . Validation of the diabetes screening tools proposed by the American Diabetes Association in an aging Chinese population Roles Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Methodology, Writing original draft, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR Roles Conceptualization, Data curation, Formal analysis, Methodology, Writing review & editing Affiliations Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR, Research Centre of Heart, Brain, Hormone and Healthy Aging, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR Roles Data curation, Formal analysis, Investigation, Methodology, Project administration Affiliation Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR Roles Formal analysis, Methodology, Project administration, Writing review & editing Affiliation Department of Medicine, The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong, Hong Kong SAR Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month With Efforts To Reduce Health Disparities

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month With Efforts To Reduce Health Disparities

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month With Efforts to Reduce Health Disparities Click Here to Receive Diabetes news via Email February isBlack History Month, and to raise awareness about the severity of type 2 diabetes among theAfrican-American community, the American Diabetes Association is reinforcing its campaignefforts. Currently, almost30 million people live withdiabetes in the United States. African-Americans represent13.2 percent of those diagnosed, whilenon-Hispanic whites represent7.6 percent. Statistics also show African-Americans are more prone to developing seriouscomplications of diabetes, such as amputations, kidney disease and blindness. The risk of developing complications may be impossible to completely eliminate, but a good control of diabetes has been proven fundamental to reducing those risks. Samuel Dagogo-Jack, from theAmerican Diabetes Association, said in a press release :Despite the continuing epidemic of diabetes with disparate impacts on ethnic minority groups, the good news is that interventions for prevention and treatment of diabetes are equally effective, regardless of race or ethnicity. This underscores the urgency of timely and optimal intervention in African Americans and other high risk groups.As part of Black History Month, the American Diabetes Association wants to draw attention to the seriousness of diabetes among the African American community and encourage the community to become educated about their risk for type 2 diabetes and the steps they can take to lead healthier lives. The Association is committed to decreaseand eventually eliminate these racial health disparities in diabetes, and improve health education incommunities, and opportunities for outreach andtraining focused onAfrican-Americans. Last ye Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus: Screening And Diagnosis

Diabetes Mellitus: Screening And Diagnosis

Diabetes mellitus is one of the most common diagnoses made by family physicians. Uncontrolled diabetes can lead to blindness, limb amputation, kidney failure, and vascular and heart disease. Screening patients before signs and symptoms develop leads to earlier diagnosis and treatment, but may not reduce rates of end-organ damage. Randomized trials show that screening for type 2 diabetes does not reduce mortality after 10 years, although some data suggest mortality benefits after 23 to 30 years. Lifestyle and pharmacologic interventions decrease progression to diabetes in patients with impaired fasting glucose or impaired glucose tolerance. Screening for type 1 diabetes is not recommended. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force recommends screening for abnormal blood glucose and type 2 diabetes in adults 40 to 70 years of age who are overweight or obese, and repeating testing every three years if results are normal. Individuals at higher risk should be considered for earlier and more frequent screening. The American Diabetes Association recommends screening for type 2 diabetes annually in patients 45 years and older, or in patients younger than 45 years with major risk factors. The diagnosis can be made with a fasting plasma glucose level of 126 mg per dL or greater; an A1C level of 6.5% or greater; a random plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater; or a 75-g two-hour oral glucose tolerance test with a plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater. Results should be confirmed with repeat testing on a subsequent day; however, a single random plasma glucose level of 200 mg per dL or greater with typical signs and symptoms of hyperglycemia likely indicates diabetes. Additional testing to determine the etiology of diabetes is not routinely recommended. Clinical r Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month And Commitment To Reducing Health Disparities

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month And Commitment To Reducing Health Disparities

American Diabetes Association Celebrates Black History Month and Commitment to Reducing Health Disparities ALEXANDRIA, Va., Feb. 2, 2015 /PRNewswire-USNewswire/ -- During Black History Month, the American Diabetes Association (Association) is raising awareness about the seriousness of type 2 diabetes among the African American community. Currently, there are nearly 30 million people living with diabetes in the U.S. African Americans are disproportionately affected with 13.2% having been diagnosed with diabetes, compared to 7.6% of non-Hispanic whites. They are also at an increased risk for serious complications of diabetes, which include blindness, kidney disease and amputations. Although the risk forcomplicationscan't be eliminated, good control of diabetes has been shown to reduce those risks. "Despite the continuing epidemic of diabetes with disparate impacts on ethnic minority groups, the good news is that interventions for prevention and treatment of diabetes are equally effective, regardless of race or ethnicity. This underscores the urgency of timely and optimal intervention in African Americans and other high risk groups," said Samuel Dagogo-Jack, MD, FRCP, President, Medicine & Science, American Diabetes Association. "As part of Black History Month, the American Diabetes Association wants to draw attention to the seriousness of diabetes among the African American community and encourage the community to become educated about their risk for type 2 diabetes and the steps they can take to lead healthier lives." The Association has an unflagging commitment to the reduction and ultimate elimination of health disparities in diabetes through community education, outreach and training focused on African American communities. Last year, the Association's African Americ Continue reading >>

Definition Of American Diabetes Association (ada)

Definition Of American Diabetes Association (ada)

Medical Definition of American Diabetes Association (ADA) American Diabetes Association (ADA): The American Diabetes Association (ADA) provides the following introduction: "The American Diabetes Association is the nation's leading nonprofit health organization providing diabetes research, information and advocacy. Founded in 1940, it was reorganized in 1969 to increase its ability to serve the public. Today, offices in more than 800 communities conduct programs in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. "The mission of the organization is to prevent and cure diabetes, and to improve the lives of all people affected by diabetes. To fulfill this mission, the American Diabetes Association funds research, publishes scientific findings, and provides information and other services to people with diabetes, their families, health care professionals and the public." The statement quoted above is from the ADA internet site (www.diabetes.org) which contains much useful and reliable information concerning diabetes. Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association Offers Free Diabetes Prevention Camp In Oxnard For At-risk Youth

American Diabetes Association Offers Free Diabetes Prevention Camp In Oxnard For At-risk Youth

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the Conversation Guidelines and FAQs American Diabetes Association offers FREE diabetes prevention camp in Oxnard for at-risk youth Teresa Todd, for Gold Coast Health Plan Published 10:53 p.m. PT Aug. 7, 2017 This story is produced and presented by Gold Coast Health Plan This free event strengthens and educates children and their families on the importance of healthy living. The American Diabetes Association brings its summer diabetes prevention camp, Camp PowerUp, to Oxnard youth ages 7 through 15 who are at risk for diabetes or who have a family history of Type 2 diabetes. The camp runs 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Aug. 12 and 13 at the Boys & Girls Club of Greater Oxnard and Port Hueneme, 1900 W. 5th St., Oxnard. Camp PowerUp Oxnard is sponsored by Gold Coast Health Plan, which administers Medi-Cal to more than 200,000 Ventura Country residents. The camp is free to all families, but advance registration is required. We take diabetes and childhood obesity seriously and support the associations prevention camp, said Dr. Nancy Wharfield, Gold Coast Health Plans interim chief medical officer. Early interventions like this give young people the tools to make healthier choices. Diabetes is a serious disease that strikes nearly 30 million Americans, including 1 in 10 people living in and around the Oxnard area. Nationally, there are an estimated 86 million people who have pre-diabetes, a condition where blood glucose, or sugar, is higher than normal, but not high enough to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes. The primary risk factors for Type 2 diabetes are being overweight, sedentary and having a family history of diabetes. African Americans, Hispanics/Latinos, Native Americans, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders are at an incre Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association - Ada

American Diabetes Association - Ada

The American Diabetes Association (ADA), formed in 1940, was created to fight diabetes through education and research. Local chapters and affiliates use volunteers to organize educational and screening programs and to conduct fundraising activities to support research aimed at care, control, and cure of diabetes. The Association supports research into the nature and cause of diabetes, more effective means of treatment, factors leading to complications, and prevention and cure of diabetes. Salary support is provided to promising young researchers, and research grants provide scientists with equipment, supplies, and technical assistance for the study of diabetes. Research symposia and scientific sessions are conducted annually. Five professional journals keep the medical and scientific communities up to date in their respective fields. Patient educational programs are conducted by the State and metropolitan affiliates. The ADA also cooperates with governmental organizations at all levels and encourages governmental legislation and programs directed at people with diabetes. There are 40 affiliate organizations and over 800 local chapters. The Association publishes educational materials for a variety of lay audiences and patients. Some topics include blood and urine testing, information for rescue personnel, insulin, foods and nutrition, children with diabetes, employment, travel, and complications such as hypoglycemia and foot problems. Specialized periodicals for professionals are also available. Serial publications: Diabetes Care (magazine), 12 times per year--for those in clinical practice; Diabetes (journal), monthly--provides research scientists and the medical profession with current information on diabetes research; Clinical Diabetes (newsletter), bimonthly--brief, Continue reading >>

Ada Diabetes Management Guidelines A1c Diagnosis | Ndei

Ada Diabetes Management Guidelines A1c Diagnosis | Ndei

Criteria for Diabetes Diagnosis: 4 options Fasting is defined as no caloric intake for 8 hours 2-hr PG 200 mg/dL (11.1 mmol/L) during OGTT (75-g)* Using a glucose load containing the equivalent of 75g anhydrous glucose dissolved in water Performed in a lab using NGSP-certified method and standardized to DCCT assay In individuals with symptoms of hyperglycemia or hyperglycemic crisis No clear clinical diagnosis? Immediately repeat the same test using a new blood sample. Same test with same or similar results? Diagnosis confirmed. Different tests above diagnostic threshold? Diagnosis confirmed. Discordant results from two separate tests? Repeat the test with a result above diagnostic cut-point. Conditions associated with insulin resistance *African-American, Latino, Native American, Asian American, Pacific Islander Severe obesity, acanthosis nigricans, polycystic ovarian syndrome Screening Children for Type 2 Diabetes and Prediabetes Consider screening for type 2 diabetes and prediabetes for all children who are overweight* and have two or more of the following risk factors: Family history of type 2 diabetes in a first- or second-degree relative Native American, African American, Latino, Asian American, or Pacific Islander descent Signs of insulin resistance or conditions associated with insulin resistance Maternal history of diabetes or GDM during the childs gestation Test every 3 years using A1C beginning at age 10 or onset of puberty *BMI >85th percentile for age and sex, weight for height >85th percentile, or weight >120% ideal weight Acanthosis nigricans, hypertension, dyslipidemia, polycystic ovarian syndrome, or small-for-gestational-age birth weight Screening for Gestational Diabetes (GDM) Test for undiagnosed type 2 at first prenatal visit using standard diagnos Continue reading >>

American Diabetes Association

American Diabetes Association

We lead the fight against the deadly consequences of diabetes and fight for those affected by diabetes. We fund research to prevent, cure and manage diabetes. We deliver services to hundreds of communities. We provide objective and credible information. We give voice to those denied their rights because of diabetes. Founded in 1940, the American Diabetes Associations mission is to prevent and cure diabetes and to improve the lives of allpeople affected by diabetes. In 2009, the Association launched a movement to Stop Diabetes. The movement will inspire and mobilize millions to take up the fight against this deadly disease. The Association has been funding innovative research to combat diabetes since 1955. In 2010, we funded more than $34 million in research at 125 leading research institutions throughout the country. The Association provides the public and health care professionals with the most up-to-date information to help take a stand against diabetes through our Center for Information and Community Support (1-800-DIABETES) and two web sites, www.diabetes.org and www.stopdiabetes.com, as well as via consumer and professional books and periodicals. The organization has offices in communities across the country and serves the public through a multitude of programs and activities including American Diabetes Association Expos in 11 markets, 55 sessions of Diabetes Camp each summer for kids with diabetes, and outreach to high-risk populations through its Por tu Familia, Live Empowered! and Native American initiatives. The Association fights on behalf of the diabetes community to increase federal funding for diabetes research and programs, improve comprehensive health care and insurance coverage, and to end discrimination against people with diabetes. Diabetes is a disea Continue reading >>

Aarp And American Diabetes Association Launch The Lets Be Well Diabetes Box Tm To Provide Health And Wellness Resources To People With Type 2 Diabetes - April 30, 2018

Aarp And American Diabetes Association Launch The Lets Be Well Diabetes Box Tm To Provide Health And Wellness Resources To People With Type 2 Diabetes - April 30, 2018

AARP and American Diabetes Association Launch the Lets Be Well Diabetes Box to Provide Health and Wellness Resources to People with Type 2 Diabetes Curated Boxes Offer Practical and Useable Products and Information that Enable People with Diabetes to Develop and Maintain a Healthy Lifestyle En espaol | WASHINGTON, DCWith one of every seven health care dollars being spent treating diabetes and its complications, diabetes is now considered the most expensive chronic condition in the U.S. To help support the millions of Americans living with diabetes, AARP and the American Diabetes Association (ADA) have joined forces to provide a new offering for people with type 2 diabetes, the Lets Be Well Diabetes Box. The box includes everyday wellness resources for people with diabetes, and contains expertly chosen products and information that can help people take important steps toward effectively managing the onset of type 2 diabetes. While age is a risk factor for type 2 diabetes, lifestyle choices are critically important in preventing, delaying or managing the condition. The Lets Be Well Diabetes Box delivers a blend of lifestyle products, resources and information to support the needs of individuals with diabetes. The boxes can be purchased by friends, family members, caregivers or people with diabetes, and is shipped directly to the recipients doorstep. Delivering innovative solutions that enable people to live their healthiest lives is a top priority for us at AARP, and this Lets Be Well collaboration with the ADA puts peoples health and wellness at the forefront, said Andy Miller, senior VP of innovation and product development, AARP. We know that people want to be empowered to take care of themselves, and they want to do so on their own terms. These boxes provide the oppo Continue reading >>

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