diabetestalk.net

Almonds And Diabetes Type 1

9 Wonder Foods For Diabetics

9 Wonder Foods For Diabetics

Eating foods with whole grains, fresh veggies, fruit & protein is a key to good health. And it becomes even more important if you are suffering from something like diabetes. As a diabetic, it is even more essential to watch what you eat, and take all possible steps to control your blood sugar levels. To help you manage your diabetes, here’s a list of 9 wonder foods that research has shown to be deeply beneficial in managing your blood sugar & helping you live healthier! These foods are packed with powerful antioxidants, minerals, vitamins, fiber and most importantly they are familiar and easy to find. Chances are, that to find them, you don’t have to hunt down specialty grocery stores as they are easily available in your kitchen. Amla For those suffering from diabetes, Amla is a good source of Vitamin C, which is required for repairing of pancreatic tissues. It also further prevents the damage of insulin producing cells. Amla contains chromium that regulates the carbohydrate metabolism in your body. Consumption of amla may make your body more responsive to Insulin. You can have one raw amla once in a day, but avoid processed forms of amla, especially those that have added sugar, as they can aggravate blood sugar levels.Get to know more about healthy sugar levels. Garlic Garlic has several health benefits and is not limited to a particular disease only. But, for a diabetes patient, regular consumption of garlic can help in increasing the amount of insulin released that regulates blood sugar levels. The sulphurous compounds present in garlic play a vital role in increasing insulin levels. Garlic has the potential of lowering the effects of complications developed because of diabetes. Research has shown that it also reduces bad cholesterol, fights infections and aids b Continue reading >>

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

Your 5-week Diabetic Diet Meal Plan

The Outsmart Diabetes Diet is based on new research that found four specific nutrients—fiber, vitamin D, omega-3s, and calcium—work together to help balance blood sugar and encourage weight loss. Build your daily diabetic diet meal plan by choosing one breakfast, one lunch and one dinner, plus two snacks—any combination gets you approximately 1,400 calories a day and a healthy dose of the "Fat-Fighting 4." Remember to eat about every 3 hours and practice portion control. Prevention Premium: What Every Woman Knows About Erectile Dysfunction Follow this mix and match diabetic diet meal plan—adapted from The Outsmart Diabetes Diet—for the next five weeks to help fight fat, maintain healthy blood sugar levels, boost energy, and reduce your diabetes risk. BREAKFAST Fruity bagel breakfast: Spread 1 Tbsp light cream cheese and 1 tsp 100% fruit spread on ½ of a whole grain bagel. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk. Crunchy yogurt: Combine 6 oz fat-free light yogurt, ¼ c granola cereal, 1 Tbsp ground flax seed, and 1 Tbsp chopped nuts. Add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Eggs and English muffin: Scramble 1 egg in a pan coated with 1 tsp canola or olive oil; top with ¼ c chopped tomato, onion, and chile salsa. Serve with toasted 100% whole grain English muffin, spread with 2 Tbsp low-fat (1%) cottage cheese, and 1 c fat-free milk. Instead of scrambled eggs, try poaching an egg: Good Morning Blend: Stir together 6 ounces fat-free yogurt, 2 Tbsp dried mixed fruit, 2 Tbsp ground flax seed and 2 Tbsp chopped almonds, walnuts, or pecans. Nutty Oatmeal: Top ½ c cooked oatmeal with ¼ c walnuts or other nuts; add ground cinnamon and/or sugar substitute to taste. Serve with 1 c fat-free milk or calcium-enriched soy or rice beverage. Bagel and cream cheese: Sprea Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Almonds

Diabetes And Almonds

It has been well-documented that in addition to being a delicious snack, almonds are also full of nutrients that have an overall positive effect on one's general health. Over the past several years, research has been conducted that has demonstrated a palpable connection between almond consumption and decreased symptoms specifically for diabetics. Risk factors for diabetes: Weight Being overweight is a significant risk factor for diabetes, since more fat tissue means more insulin resistance. A High Density Lipoproten (HDL) level under 35 A high level of triglycerides in the body’s blood Hypertension, or high blood pressure Metabolic syndrome Almonds and Diabetes Given the specific nutrients that almonds contain, research has suggested that adding almonds to a well-balanced diet can act as both a preventative measure and part of a comprehensive treatment for your diabetes. Weight Although they are calorically dense, almonds can effectively facilitate weight control Due to the high caloric value of almonds, satiation is achieved more quickly According to several studies, the majority of people who add almonds to their diet naturally balance their calorie consumption by ingesting less calories from other foods Almonds may aid in inhibiting the absorption of fat and carbohydrates in the body HDL levels Integrating almonds into a well-balanced diet can raise HDL levels while reducing LDL levels Metabolic syndrome Diets rich in magnesium can decrease your susceptibility to metabolic syndrome, a group of disorders that increase your risk for diabetes A 95 gram serving of almonds contains 64% of the daily recommended requirement of magnesium Hypertension Almonds are a rich source of magnesium Magnesium is associated with a decrease in hypertension In addition: Integrating almo Continue reading >>

Pine Nuts In Diabetes

Pine Nuts In Diabetes

Man enough long been used for medicinal purposes pine needles, nuts, and resin of the cedar. From them he learned to cook a lot of miracle cures. A small content in the pine nuts carbohydrates allows their use in the diet of patients suffering from diabetes . the presence of useful substances to humans pine nuts ahead of all the others nuts . It includes vitamins A, B, E, D, and F, many fatty acids and trace elements. Contained in pine nuts are vitamin B1 (thiamine) promotes optimal utilization of carbohydrates by the body. For a healthy person it is required in the amount of about 2 mg per day, diabetes the need for it is greatly increased. Protein of the cedar nut contains much more amino acids than the proteins included in the composition of other nuts. This makes it a product with high biological value. More than half of the amino acids are indispensable for human body, most of them is arginine. This substance helps to regulate blood pressure, provides the required level of cholesterol in blood, strengthens immunity, prevents blood clots, leads to normal connective tissue. This is very important for people with diabetes. Vitamin B6 contributes to metabolism improvement, formation of blood cells, which is important since comorbidity diabetes mellitus is a frequent speaker arteriosclerosis. Chromium, zinc and polyunsaturated acid pine nuts make an excellent tool for the prevention of diabetes. Linoleic acid, which are very much helps the patient maintain normal blood pressure, improves circulation and stimulates regeneration processes. In pine nuts contains a small amount of fiber. This property allows them not to irritate the stomach. today, diabetes is not an obstacle to a full life. But to his diet patients need to be treated much more carefully than other people. Continue reading >>

Go Nuts To Fight Diabetes

Go Nuts To Fight Diabetes

Type 2 diabetics eat nuts to improve blood sugar control (RxWiki News) People with diabetes have to pay a lot of attention to what they put in their bodies. Some foods can hurt patients, while others can help them control the disease. Nuts may be one of those helpful foods. Type 2 diabetics who eat nuts every day may find it easier to control blood sugar. Eating nuts may also lower levels of LDL cholesterol, known as bad cholesterol. "Eat two ounces of nuts a day to control your diabetes." People with type 2 diabetes have to avoid eating foods high in carbohydrates, which can raise blood sugar levels. High-carbohydrate foods include potatoes, corn, beans and grains. David Jenkins, M.D., from the University of Toronto, wanted to see if diabetics could consume nuts in place of high-carbohydrate foods. In an article published in the journal Diabetes Care, the researchers show that eating nuts may keep type 2 diabetes under control in addition to preventing complications caused by the disease. Mixed, unsalted, raw or dry-roasted nuts are benefitical for controlling blood sugar and blood lipids, also known as blood fats, says Dr. Jenkins. He adds that nuts could be used as part of a strategy to help patients control their diabetes without gaining weight. "Nuts can be a nutritious value-add to any diet if consumed organic and raw as well as in moderation," says Mark Bans, D.C., of Bans Health & Wellness (www.banswellness.com). "Nuts contain good, healthy oils and can be a good snack to help maintain blood sugar levels in between meals. The key, however, is to watch the amount of nuts eaten at any one time, as eating too many nuts can increase one's calorie intake for the day. Also, any one food that is eaten too much can possibly lead to allergies/sensitivities to that food. Continue reading >>

Almonds Ward Off Diabetes, Says Study

Almonds Ward Off Diabetes, Says Study

Eating almonds could help prevent diabetes and heart disease, according to a study. The research found incorporating the nuts into our diets may help treat type 2 diabetes, which accounts for 90 to 95 per cent of all cases. As well as combating the condition, linked to obesity and physical inactivity, it could tackle cardiovascular disease, the report published in the Journal of the American College of Nutrition said. Diabetes is one of the fastest growing diseases in the world, and sufferers have a shortage of insulin or a decreased ability to use the hormone that allows glucose (sugar) to enter cells and be converted to energy. When diabetes is not controlled, glucose and fats remain in the blood and over time, damage vital organs. The study found consuming a diet rich in almonds may help improve insulin sensitivity and decrease LDL-cholesterol levels in those with pre-diabetes, a condition in which people have blood glucose levels higher than normal but not high enough to be classified as diabetes. Researchers looked at the effects of consuming an almond-enriched diet on 65 adults with pre-diabetes (48 women and 17 men) with an average age in the mid-50s. The participants were split up, and the group on the almond-enriched diet showed greater improvements in insulin sensitivity and clinically significant reductions in LDL-cholesterol compared with the nut-free group. Dr Michelle Wien, assistant research professor in nutrition at Loma Linda University's School of Public Health, said, "We have made great strides in chronic disease research from evidence of effective treatment to evidence of effective prevention." The principal researcher for the study, conducted at the University of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey, added, "It is promising for those with risk facto Continue reading >>

Diabetes And Dark Chocolate

Diabetes And Dark Chocolate

Share: Mouthwatering dark chocolate; could it be true that there are health benefits to eating it? Should someone with diabetes avoid the sheer pleasure of dark chocolate? Are there any precautions to take? What is the real story surrounding dark chocolate and diabetes? Last but not least DiabetesCare.net has a list of 5 recipes that include dark chocolate for your utter enjoyment. The health benefits of eating chocolate: Research scientists are studying good bacteria found in the digestive tract of people that normally eat cocoa. Preliminary findings are pointing in the direction that this bacteria is helping to ferment antioxidants and fiber found in cocoa. These bacteria are thought to help create compounds that are anti-inflammatory and help with our cardiovascular health. In one study of healthy individuals, it was found that by eating a small square (8 grams) of dark chocolate (70% cocoa chocolate) every day for a months’ time an improvement in vascular function over their own baseline as well as the control group was shown. This small amount can potentially help to decrease the risk of heart disease. The research was done on pure, unsweetened cocoa powder and it is advised that even the darkest chocolate must be consumed in moderation to avoid excess calories and weight gain. At this time scientists can not recommend an ideal amount of cocoa powder to eat. (1) For people with type 2 diabetes, daily dark chocolate consumption of 20 grams per day (that was rich with polyphenols) helped increase the sensitivity to insulin. This is important for blood glucose control. Increasing insulin sensitivity may also help delay the onset of type 2 diabetes in people with pre-diabetes. (1) A review of literature in 2012 found that eating dark chocolate every day reduced blood Continue reading >>

Almond Butter Used To Control Blood Sugar Spikes At Night

Almond Butter Used To Control Blood Sugar Spikes At Night

Almond butter used to control blood sugar spikes at night Member Diagnosed with full blown Type 2 on 9/26/2006 Almond butter used to control blood sugar spikes at night On the Doctor Oz show I saw a guy named Tim Ferriss who recommended two table spoons of almond butter before bedtime to prevent blood sugar spikes when your are trying to sleep. I am still working on a palatable form in which to ingest the almond butter, but I must say it seems to be working rather well to date. So far the most palatable form I have found is to apply it to either saltine crackers or Ritz crackers in enough quantities equal to the 2 table spoons. I dont eat it like food rather I ingest it like medicine. To date I am still using melatonin to help me sleep. I am just wondering if anyone else has tried using Almond Butter as an aid to their insomnia problems and what their experience has been. D.D. Family Getting much harder to control I can't say I have but the fact its put on crackers would raise my bs level. I avoid Dr. Oz after I saw his show on diabetes and a type 1 diabetic with the legs cut off, shock and aw tv more good could have been done but maybe it shocked people into taking care of themselves. Member Diagnosed with full blown Type 2 on 9/26/2006 I use the crackers, like 6 total, to make it more palatable. My morning BS levels have been a high of 106 and a low of 89 since April 29th. So I don't believe the crackers are hurting me all that much. The crackers would spike me very high too because they are made with wheat. I have been using Raw Almond butter for years even before Diabetes. What I do is mix some in a small bowl and mix it with chia seeds, ground flaxseed, unsweet coconut and a few splashes of Davinci syrup. So it comes out more like a pudding. I find it works 80% of Continue reading >>

Diabetes And King Of The Nuts| Diabetic.today

Diabetes And King Of The Nuts| Diabetic.today

Almonds are a very good combination of fibre, protein, copper, riboflavin, calcium as well as vitamin E and Magnesium. The most protein packed available of tree nuts, almonds are the nuts with the nutritional punch! Infact, almonds are the King of Nuts. With all these healthy bullets packed within them, almonds become the powerhouse for not only normal humans but also for those suffering from diabetes. Various researches and studies conducted have proven thatconsumption of Almonds on a daily basis leads to lower levels of fasting insulin and fasting glucose.The thumbnail rule to be followed here is that the intake of a good amount of almondsshouldin turn, be balanced by reduced intake of other calories so as to justify the calories consumed through almonds. Almond consumption is also known to increase insulin sensitivity in people with prediabetes. As far as Type II diabetes is concerned, Almond intake post meals has helped to reduce post-meal glucose levels; an increase in these levels can also lead to cardiovascular diabetes complications. One can consume Almonds during breakfast as a part of cereals, almond butter on toast or add a few almonds to smoothies. Duringlunch or dinnerone can add almonds to salads or stir-fry dishes. As a mid-meal snack, one can munch on whole almonds which are very filling or add them to your favourite fresh fruits and salads. On an average, about one ounce of almonds which is 23 almonds, contains about 161 calories, 6 grams of protein and 3 grams of dietary fiber. With all the above benefits, consuming almonds daily should be a habit, cultivated from childhood and surely this will go a long way in evolving your good health. So lets sum it up WITHOUT ANY IFS OR BUTS, DIABETICS MUST CONSUME THE KING OF NUTS!!! E147 Diabetes and Almonds www Continue reading >>

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

We're Nuts About Nuts, Seeds, Peanut Butter & Nut Butters!

Nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters are a great source of protein and natural fats. This means that they make for a great 'GD food pairing tool' to eat with carbohydrates to slow down the absorption of glucose into the bloodstream. But with so many different products available to buy, which ones should you choose and are any better than others? Here we share with you all our hints and tips for choosing the best nuts, seeds, peanut butter and nut butters... Nuts Nuts are a great source of protein and natural fat but they do still contain carbohydrates, meaning that some nuts are better than others. The best choice for nuts are nuts which are not salted or flavoured. Looking at this chart we can see that cashew nuts and pistachio nuts contain the highest amounts of carbohydrates, making them the nuts which aren't so good for pairing if eaten in larger amounts. Another nut that is high in carbohydrates, which isn't listed on this chart is the chestnut, so be wary of these carby nuts at Christmas! Highest in protein are the peanut and almonds. With macademia, walnuts and pecans being the highest in fats. That makes these nuts better for food pairing. Flavoured or coated nuts Salted, dry roasted, sweet chilli, BBQ, salt & vinegar, yoghurt coated, crispy shells, chocolate coated, you name it they seem make nuts covered or coated in so many different things. Savoury nuts included salted, dry roasted and flavoured contain high amounts of salt, so bear this in mind when eating them. Choosing nuts which are yoghurt or chocolate coated means that you are significantly increasing the carb amount, making these type of nuts possibly suitable for a treat, but would not be advisable as such good 'food pairing tools'. What about snickers, peanut M&Ms & Reese's peanut butter cups? Continue reading >>

The Effects Of Pistachios On Blood Glucose Comments

The Effects Of Pistachios On Blood Glucose Comments

Livestrong.Com Overview Blood glucose management is an important aspect of a healthy diabetes diet. Following a healthy diet plan can help stabilize your blood glucose levels and keep them within a healthy range. The American Diabetes Association praises the health benefits of nuts, calling them a diabetes superfood. You can healthfully incorporate pistachios in your diabetes diet. Carbohydrates Consuming foods that contain carbohydrate will cause your blood glucose levels to rise. Foods that contain carbohydrates include fruits, vegetables, beans, lentils, grains, milk and nuts. Carbohydrates include three main types: sugar, starch and fiber. Sugar and starch carbohydrates cause an increase in your blood glucose levels. Fiber, unlike sugar and starch, does not raise your blood glucose levels. High-fiber foods make excellent choices on a diabetes diet. Pistachios and other nuts -- as well as fruits and vegetables with edible seeds and skins, beans, legumes and whole grains -- are contain substantial amounts of fiber. Nutrition Facts A 1-oz. serving of raw pistachio nuts contains approximately 159 calories and 5.75 g of protein. One ounce of pistachios also contains about 5.54 g of total carbohydrate. Here is the carbohydrate breakdown: Out of the 5.54 g of total carbohydrate, 2.17 g is from naturally-occurring sugars, 0.47 g is from starch and 2.9 g is from fiber. Blood Glucose Basics After you eat pistachio nuts, the food debris travels to your stomach in order to undergo the process of digestion. Once in your stomach, the pistachios begin to break down. The sugar carbohydrates pass through the lining of your stomach and enter your bloodstream. The starch carbohydrates get broken down and converted into sugar molecules, so that they too can go through the lining of you Continue reading >>

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

Nuts And Diabetes | Charlesworth Nuts

INTRODUCTION Tree nuts such as almonds, Brazil nuts, cashews, chestnuts, hazelnuts, macadamias, pecans, pine nuts, pistachios and walnuts are packed full of beneficial nutrients for people with diabetes. Eating nuts regularly may even help prevent the onset of diabetes later in life! If you have diabetes, individualised advice from an Accredited Practising Dietitian is recommended. WHY ARE NUTS SO GOOD FOR YOU? Nuts are high in so many different vitamins, minerals and nutrients: 1. Healthy fats People with diabetes have an increased risk of developing heart disease later in life. This risk can be reduced by replacing unhealthy saturated fats in the diet with healthy polyunsaturated and monounsaturated fats, such as those found in nuts. Some people with diabetes also benefit from replacing some of the carbohydrate rich foods in their diet with foods rich in monounsaturated fats. Nuts have also been shown to improve the cholesterol and triglyceride levels of those with diabetes. Nuts high in monounsaturated fat include macadamias, cashews, almonds, pistachios, and pecans. Nuts high in polyunsaturated fat include walnuts, hazelnuts, pine nuts and Brazil nuts. One type of polyunsaturated fat that is particularly beneficial for the heart is omega-3 – nuts high in omega-3 include walnuts and pecans. 2. Low Glycemic Index Cashews, chestnuts and pecans have a low glycaemic index (GI), which means the carbohydrate they contain is broken down slowly by the body. This results in a slow, steady rise in blood glucose levels, which is beneficial for people with diabetes. While the GI of other nuts has not been tested, all nuts, with the exception of chestnuts, are low in carbohydrate and high in protein. This means they are likely to have a low GI but further research is required t Continue reading >>

Role Of Cashew Nuts And Other Nuts In The Management Of Diabetes: A Clinical Review

Role Of Cashew Nuts And Other Nuts In The Management Of Diabetes: A Clinical Review

About Authors: Satyanand Tyagi*, Patel Chirag J1, Tarun Parashar2, Soniya2, Rishikesh Gupta3, Devesh Kaushik4 *President, Tyagi Pharmacy Association & Scientific Writer (Pharmacy), Chattarpur, New Delhi, India-110074. Prof. Satyanand Tyagi is a life time member of various pharmacy professional bodies like IPA, APTI and IPGA. He has published various research papers, review articles and short communications. He is member of Editorial Advisory Board for some reputed Pharmacy Journals. He is appointed as an Author for International Pharmaceutical Writers Association (IPWA). (Appointed as an author for the chapters of book on Pharmaceutical Chemistry). His academic work includes 62 Publications (52 Review Articles, 08 Research Articles and 02 short Communications of Pharmaceutical, Medicinal and Clinical Importance, published in standard and reputed National and International Pharmacy journals; Out of 62 publications, 11 are International Publications). His research topics of interest are neurodegenerative disorders, diabetes mellitus, cancer, rare genetic disorders, psycho-pharmacological agents as well as epilepsy. 1Department of Pharmaceutics, Maharishi Arvind Institute of Pharmacy, Mansarovar, Jaipur, Rajasthan, India-302020. 2Department of Pharmaceutics, Himalayan Institute of Pharmacy and Research, Rajawala, Dehradun, Uttarakhand, India-302020. 3Institute of Pharmacy, Bundelkhand University, Jhansi, Uttar Pradesh, India-284128. 4Territory Business Manager, Diabetes Division, Abbott Healthcare Private Limited, Okhla, New Delhi, India- 110020. *sntyagi9 @yahoo.com, +91-9871111375/9582025220 ABSTRACT: Diabetes is usually a lifelong (chronic) disease in which there are high levels of sugar in the blood. Diabetes, often referred to by doctors as diabetes mellitus, describe Continue reading >>

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

A Healthy Diet For Prediabetes

Source: Web exclusive, September 2011 Prediabetes: What does it mean? A diagnosis of prediabetes is a warning sign about your health, but it’s not a life sentence. Prediabetes means having blood sugar levels that are higher than normal but not yet in the territory of diabetes ‘ and you can easily make changes that will improve your health and lower your risk of developing diabetes and its related complications. ‘Diet, in combination with activity, can have a considerable impact on the development of Type 2 diabetes,’ says New Brunswick-based registered dietitian Michelle Corcoran, who works with clients who have prediabetes, Type 1 diabetes or Type 2 diabetes. And according to the Canadian Diabetes Association, two large studies have shown that by cutting calories, reducing fat intake and exercising at least 150 minutes a week, the number of participants who progressed from prediabetes to diabetes was lowered by 58 percent. That said, prediabetes is a diagnosis that should be taken seriously. While not everyone diagnosed with prediabetes will develop Type 2 diabetes, many will’and people with prediabetes are at higher risk for heart disease and stroke. Losing weight will make a difference, if you need to’a drop of even five to 10 percent can lower your risk, Corcoran says. Follow these healthy diet guidelines to improve the health of everyone in the family, no matter what their current situation. Whole grains for a healthy diet Consuming whole grains has been shown to lower your risk of developing Type 2 diabetes, says Corcoran: ‘People who consume three servings a day are almost one-third less likely to develop Type 2 diabetes than those who consume three servings a week.’ Boost your intake by choosing whole-grain products rather than refined wherever p Continue reading >>

Diabetes

Diabetes

Are you trying to prevent diabetes, lower your blood sugar levels, or just looking to understand the condition? Learn more about diabetes and check out this list of healthy snacks handpicked by our Health Nut and Registered Dietitian. Successfully managing diabetes is all about balancing blood sugar levels and maintaining or achieving a healthy weight. What is Diabetes? Diabetes (often referred to in the medical community as diabetes mellitus) is caused by the body's inability to produce any or enough insulin. Insulin is the hormone the converts sugar, a.k.a glucose, to energy. Without adequate levels of insulin, sugar accumulates in the bloodstream instead of being delivered to cells to use as energy. This glucose build-up leads to high blood sugar, which triggers the signs and symptoms of diabetes. What is the Difference Between Type 1 and Type 2 Diabetes? Type 1 diabetes (formerly known as juvenile diabetes) is characterized by a complete lack of insulin. This type of diabetes only accounts for about 5% of people who have diabetes, and is typically diagnosed in children and young adults. In Type 1 diabetes, the immune system destroys pancreatic cells that are required to produce insulin. Blood sugar levels rise without insulin to convert glucose to energy. Type 2 diabetes (also referred to as adult-onset diabetes) is the most common form of diabetes. Affecting 95% of people with diabetes, type 2 is usually detected in adulthood, although children can also develop it. In Type 2 diabetes, the body does not effectively use insulin, a condition known as insulin resistance. Initially, the pancreas responds by making more insulin to compensate, but over time, it produces less and less. This results in insulin deficiency because the body can't make enough insulin to keep bl Continue reading >>

More in diabetes