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Allergic To Metformin What Are The Alternatives

Alternatives To Metformin

Alternatives To Metformin

What Are the Alternatives to Metformin? Metformin (Glucophage®) is a prescription medication used for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. A long-acting form, metformin ER (Glucophage XR®), is also available. For most people, metformin is effective in treating their diabetes, and most people tolerate it well. However, as with all medicines, side effects can occur. In other cases, the medicine may not completely control a person's diabetes. Fortunately, there are several alternatives to metformin. Some of the metformin alternatives include: Lifestyle Changes for Type 2 Diabetes Many lifestyle changes have been shown to be very effective for controlling type 2 diabetes (especially early type 2 diabetes). These lifestyle changes include weight loss, becoming more physically active (see Diabetes and Exercise), and changes in diet (see Diabetic Diet). In fact, these changes are important for all people with type 2 diabetes, including people taking diabetes medications. For many people, lifestyle changes alone may not be enough to adequately control type 2 diabetes. For these people, medications (including oral and injectable medications) may be necessary. Fortunately, there are many different types of oral medications available to treat type 2 diabetes, including: Sulfonylureas Sulfonylureas are medications that force the pancreas to produce more insulin. Because of this, they are very effective, but are also more likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar (hypoglycemia). These medications include: Meglitinides Meglitinides are similar to sulfonylureas, in that they force the pancreas to produce more insulin. However, they are short-acting and are less likely to cause dangerously low blood sugar. They are usually taken before every meal. Meglitinides include: Thiazolidinedio Continue reading >>

Consumer Medicine Information

Consumer Medicine Information

Information for Consumers Metformin Generic Health tablets Metformin Hydrochloride 500 mg and 850 mg tablets What is in this leaflet This leaflet answers some common questions about Metformin Generic Health tablets. It does not contain all the available information. It does not take the place of talking to your doctor or pharmacist All medicines have risks and benefits. Your doctor has weighed the risks of you taking Metformin Generic Health tablets against the benefits it is expected to have for you. If you have any concerns about taking this medicine, ask your doctor or pharmacist. Keep this leaflet with the medicine. You may want to read it again. What Metformin Generic Health tablets is used for The name of your medicine is Metformin Generic Health tablets. It contains the active ingredient Metformin hydrochloride. Metformin is used to control blood glucose in patients with diabetes mellitus, when diet and exercise are not enough to control blood glucose. There are two types of diabetes mellitus: Type I, which is called insulin dependent diabetes Type II, also called non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus (NIDDM) or maturity onset diabetes Metformin can be used in patients with Type I diabetes mellitus where insulin alone is not enough to control your blood glucose levels. Metformin can also be used in patients with Type II diabetes. It can be used alone, or in combination with other medicines for treating diabetes. Your doctor may have prescribed Metformin Generic Health tablets for another reason. Ask your doctor if you have any questions about why Metformin Generic Health tablets were prescribed for you. How Metformin Generic Health tablets work Metformin belongs to a group of medicines called biguanides. Metformin lowers high blood glucose by helping your body Continue reading >>

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

Metformin - Oral, Glucophage

are allergic to dapagliflozin or any of the ingredients in FARXIGA. Symptoms of a serious allergic reaction may include skin rash, raised red patches on your skin (hives), swelling of the face, lips, tongue, and throat that may cause difficulty in breathing or swallowing. If you have any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and contact your healthcare provider or go to the nearest hospital emergency room right away have severe kidney problems or are on dialysis. Your healthcare provider should do blood tests to check how well your kidneys are working before and during your treatment with FARXIGA Dehydration (the loss of body water and salt), which may cause you to feel dizzy, faint, lightheaded, or weak, especially when you stand up (orthostatic hypotension). You may be at a higher risk of dehydration if you have low blood pressure; take medicines to lower your blood pressure, including water pills (diuretics); are 65 years of age or older; are on a low salt diet, or have kidney problems Ketoacidosis occurred in people with type 1 and type 2 diabetes during treatment with FARXIGA. Ketoacidosis is a serious condition which may require hospitalization and may lead to death. Symptoms may include nausea, tiredness, vomiting, trouble breathing, and abdominal pain. If you get any of these symptoms, stop taking FARXIGA and call your healthcare provider right away. If possible, check for ketones in your urine or blood, even if your blood sugar is less than 250 mg/dL Kidney problems. Sudden kidney injury occurred in people taking FARXIGA. Talk to your doctor right away if you reduce the amount you eat or drink, or if you lose liquids; for example, from vomiting, diarrhea, or excessive heat exposure Serious urinary tract infections (UTI), some that lead to hospitalization, occu Continue reading >>

Brand Name Sandoz Metformin Fc Common Name Metformin

Brand Name Sandoz Metformin Fc Common Name Metformin

The content of this page: How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. How should I use this medication? The recommended adult dose of metformin ranges from 500 mg 3 or 4 times a day to 850 mg 2 or 3 times a day. The maximum daily dose should not exceed 2,550 mg daily. Tablets should be taken with food whenever possible to reduce the risk of nausea and vomiting. Me Continue reading >>

U.s. Fda Approves Invokamet® Xr (canagliflozin / Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-release) For The Treatment Of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

U.s. Fda Approves Invokamet® Xr (canagliflozin / Metformin Hydrochloride Extended-release) For The Treatment Of Adults With Type 2 Diabetes

RARITAN, N.J., Sept. 21, 2016 /PRNewswire/ -- Janssen Pharmaceuticals, Inc. (Janssen) announced today the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) has approved INVOKAMET® XR—a once-daily, fixed-dose combination therapy of canagliflozin and metformin hydrochloride extended-release (XR)—for first-line use as an adjunct to diet and exercise to improve blood glucose control in adults with type 2 diabetes when treatment with the two medications is appropriate.1 INVOKAMET® XR combines INVOKANA® (canagliflozin), the most prescribed sodium glucose co-transporter 2 (SGLT2) inhibitor, with more than 9 million U.S. prescriptions since launch,2 and an XR formulation of metformin. Metformin is commonly prescribed as an initial therapy for the treatment of type 2 diabetes. "INVOKAMET® XR offers the convenience of once-daily dosing and provides physicians needed flexibility for tailoring treatment to the needs of type 2 diabetes patients, especially those with higher A1C levels," said John Anderson, M.D.,* Frist Clinic, Nashville, Tenn. "As with INVOKAMET®, physicians can prescribe the XR formulation to adults when they are first diagnosed with type 2 diabetes or as additional therapy for people whose A1C levels are not well controlled with either agent alone." Phase 3 studies have shown the combination of INVOKANA® and metformin reduces A1C significantly more than metformin alone, sitagliptin plus metformin, or glimepiride plus metformin. Treatment with INVOKANA® as an add-on to metformin also demonstrated greater reductions in the secondary endpoints of body weight and systolic blood pressure. The approved indication for INVOKAMET® XR aligns with current type 2 diabetes treatment guidelines from the American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists and American College of Continue reading >>

Gliptins Vs. The Alternatives For Type 2 Diabetes

Gliptins Vs. The Alternatives For Type 2 Diabetes

Gliptins are less effective than metformin monotherapy; when used with metformin, they confer some advantages and some disadvantages compared with other combinations. Dipeptidyl peptidase-4 inhibitors (e.g., Januvia, Onglyza, Tradjenta), also known as “gliptins,” are oral hypoglycemic drugs that raise blood incretin levels, thereby inhibiting glucagon release and lowering blood-glucose levels. In a meta-analysis involving 14,000 adults with type 2 diabetes, investigators compared gliptins with metformin (8 monotherapy trials) and, in the context of concomitant metformin therapy, with other hypoglycemic agents (11 combination-therapy trials). Compared with metformin monotherapy, gliptin use conferred a smaller reduction in glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c) levels (mean difference, 0.2%), more-frequent failure to achieve HbA1c levels <7%, and less weight loss (mean difference, 1.5 kg). However, gliptin recipients were less likely than metformin recipients to discontinue therapy because of adverse events. All differences were statistically significant. With concomitant metformin, gliptins were less effective in lowering HbA1c than sulfonylureas, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) agonists, or pioglitazone. Gliptins yielded more weight loss than a sulfonylurea or pioglitazone (mean differences: 1.9 kg and 3.0 kg, respectively) but less weight loss than a GLP-1 agonist (mean difference, 1.6 kg). All differences were statistically significant. Hypoglycemia occurred less often with a gliptin plus metformin than with a sulfonylurea plus metformin. Gliptins perform no better than metformin in patients with type 2 diabetes. A sulfonylurea plus metformin achieves slightly better glycemic control than a gliptin plus metformin, but the latter combination causes less hypoglycemia and Continue reading >>

Jamp-metformin

Jamp-metformin

How does this medication work? What will it do for me? Metformin belongs to the class of medications called oral hypoglycemics, which are medications that lower blood sugar. It is used to control blood glucose (blood sugar) for people with type 2 diabetes. It is used when diet, exercise, and weight reduction have not been found to lower blood glucose well enough on their own. Metformin works by reducing the amount of glucose made by the liver and by making it easier for glucose to enter into the tissues of the body. Metformin has been found to be especially useful in delaying problems associated with diabetes for overweight people with diabetes. This medication may be available under multiple brand names and/or in several different forms. Any specific brand name of this medication may not be available in all of the forms or approved for all of the conditions discussed here. As well, some forms of this medication may not be used for all of the conditions discussed here. Your doctor may have suggested this medication for conditions other than those listed in these drug information articles. If you have not discussed this with your doctor or are not sure why you are taking this medication, speak to your doctor. Do not stop taking this medication without consulting your doctor. Do not give this medication to anyone else, even if they have the same symptoms as you do. It can be harmful for people to take this medication if their doctor has not prescribed it. What form(s) does this medication come in? 500 mg Each white-to-off-white, round, biconvex, film-coated tablet scored on one side and debossed with "J1" on the other side contains 500 mg of metformin HCl. Nonmedicinal ingredients: hypromellose, povidone, sodium starch glycolate, colloidal silicon dioxide, magnesium stear Continue reading >>

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin Side Effects And How To Deal With Them

Metformin side effects include diabetic neuropathy, brain fog, and digestive issues. You can address them through diet, Vitamin B12, CoQ10, and exercise. Let us understand the drug Metformin in detail and study different forms of metformin, its uses and common metformin side effects along with how to deal with them. Metformin: What Is It Used For? Metformin is an old warhorse in the pharma battle against diabetes. It has been the mainstay in the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes for more than fifty years, often matching or outperforming newer drugs. In fact, many new combination drugs are often created with metformin as one of the main ingredients. Thanks to its long run in the pharmaceutical world, the side effects of Metformin are also well known. The Metformin-PCOS connection has been studied extensively since a majority of health complications associated with PCOS (polycystic ovarian syndrome) are due to hyperinsulinemia (high amounts of insulin in the blood stream). Metformin is known to reduce circulating insulin levels. The use of this drug in women with PCOS has shown highly encouraging results. RELATED: 10 Easy Breakfast Ideas For Diabetics Most Prescribed Names in Metformin Category Include: Fortamet: It is an extended-release formulation that contains metformin hydrochloride. The tablets are designed for once-a-day administration. They deliver either 500 mg or 1000 mg of metformin. The tablet is made using a patented technology called SCOTTM that delivers the active compound slowly and at a constant rate. Glucophage: Glucophage tablets contain metformin hydrochoride. They contain either 500 mg, 850 mg or 1000 mg of the active compound. Glucophage tablets do not contain any special covering and need to be taken multiple times a day until the prescribed dosage is me Continue reading >>

Fortamet 500 Mg

Fortamet 500 Mg

Pronunciation: met FOR min Brand: Fortamet, Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Glumetza, Riomet What is the most important information I should know about metformin? You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). If you need to have any type of x-ray or CT scan using a dye that is injected into your veins, you will need to temporarily stop taking metformin. Before taking metformin, tell your doctor if you have liver disease or a history of heart disease. Some people develop lactic acidosis while taking metformin. Early symptoms may get worse over time and this condition can be fatal. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin? Metformin is an oral diabetes medicine that helps control blood sugar levels. Metformin is for people with type 2 diabetes. Metformin is sometimes used in combination with insulin or other medications, but it is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my healthcare provider before taking metformin? Some people develop a life-threatening condition called lactic acidosis while taking metformin. You may be more likely to develop lactic acidosis if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection, if you are dehydrated, or if you drink large amounts of alcohol. Talk with your doctor about your individual risk. You should not use this medication if you are allergic to metformin, or if yo Continue reading >>

Viewer Comments: Allergic Reaction - Symptoms

Viewer Comments: Allergic Reaction - Symptoms

I was spraying my rose bushes for fungus. I was using the spray that you connect with the hose. I guess the aerosol affect is what caused my reaction. I was on the 2nd rose bush when my eyes and nose started watering. I thought it was just the seasonal allergy stuff. By the 4th bush my throat started to swell and I knew something was really wrong, then I got dizzy and faint, barley made it back into my house. Called my husband and washed my arms and face off. Luckily the symptoms went away as quick as they started. It was pretty scary because I was home alone at the time. I had just started Metformin that day. In the evening I suddenly developed chills, shaking, SOB and wheezing. My physician instructed me to call 911 and go to the ER. I did. In the ambulance I had oxygen and an albuterol breathing treatment. At the hospital I had a temp, elevated white count of 1,300 + and my chest x-ray was clear. I was given an IV infusion od Levaquin. By early morning everything was back to normal, including an AP and Lat chest x-ray. I never had a cough or any other symptoms of pneumonia. I still think it was an allergic response to the Metformin. While eating at a local rest stop, I had only taken a few bites of sweet potato fries with a special sauce when the left side of my neck just below the jaw started to swell with a large lump. I began to get red splotches and itchy. I know that I am allergic to peanuts and nuts, but was assured there were none in the food I ordered. You just never know what will cause a reaction when you have food allergies. I have no idea what caused my allergic reaction. I have a raised rash all over now. Started under my armpits and underwear line and then it spread everywhere! It's the 3rd day and it still feels horrible! It's hard to work and people a Continue reading >>

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin, Oral Tablet

Metformin oral tablet is available as both a generic and brand-name drug. Brand names: Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Metformin is also available as an oral solution but only in the brand-name drug Riomet. Metformin is used to treat high blood sugar levels caused by type 2 diabetes. FDA warning: Lactic acidosis warning This drug has a Black Box Warning. This is the most serious warning from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA). A black box warning alerts doctors and patients to potentially dangerous effects. Lactic acidosis is a rare but serious side effect of this drug. In this condition, lactic acid builds up in your blood. This is a medical emergency that requires treatment in the hospital. Lactic acidosis is fatal in about half of people who develop it. You should stop taking this drug and call your doctor right away or go to the emergency room if you have signs of lactic acidosis. Symptoms include tiredness, weakness, unusual muscle pain, trouble breathing, unusual sleepiness, stomach pains, nausea (or vomiting), dizziness (or lightheadedness), and slow or irregular heart rate. Alcohol use warning: You shouldn’t drink alcohol while taking this drug. Alcohol can affect your blood sugar levels unpredictably and increase your risk of lactic acidosis. Kidney problems warning: If you have moderate to severe kidney problems, you have a higher risk of lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug. Liver problems warning: Liver disease is a risk factor for lactic acidosis. You shouldn’t take this drug if you have liver problems. Metformin oral tablet is a prescription drug that’s available as the brand name drugs Glucophage, Glucophage XR, Fortamet, and Glumetza. Glucophage is an immediate-release tablet. All of the other brands are extended-r Continue reading >>

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Metformin And Sitagliptin

Pronunciation: met FOR min and SI ta glip tin Brand: Janumet, Janumet XR Janumet 100 mg-50 mg What is the most important information I should know about metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medicine if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). This medicine may cause a serious condition called lactic acidosis. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, fast or uneven heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. What is metformin and sitagliptin? Metformin and sitagliptin are oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin works by decreasing glucose (sugar) production in the liver and decreasing absorption of glucose by the intestines. Sitagliptin works by regulating the levels of insulin your body produces after eating. Metformin and sitagliptin is a combination medicine used to treat type 2 diabetes. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and sitagliptin may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What should I discuss with my health care provider before taking metformin and sitagliptin? You should not use this medicine if you are allergic to metformin (Actoplus Met, Avandamet, Fortamet, Glucophage, Riomet) or sitagliptin (Januvia), if you have severe kidney disease, or if you are in a state of diabetic ketoacidosis (call your doctor for treatment with insulin). Some people taking metformin develop a serious condition called lactic acidosis. This may be more likely if you have liver or kidney disease, congestive heart failure, a severe infection Continue reading >>

Actoplus Met

Actoplus Met

Brand Names: Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR Generic Name: metformin and pioglitazone (Pronunciation: met FOR min and PYE o GLI ta zone) What is metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? Metformin and pioglitazone is a combination of two oral diabetes medicines that help control blood sugar levels. Metformin and pioglitazone is for people with type 2 diabetes who do not use daily insulin injections. This medication is not for treating type 1 diabetes. Metformin and pioglitazone may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide. What are the possible side effects of metformin and pioglitazone (Actoplus Met, Actoplus Met XR)? This medication may cause lactic acidosis (a build-up of lactic acid in the body, which can be fatal). Lactic acidosis can start slowly and get worse over time. Get emergency medical help if you have even mild symptoms of lactic acidosis, such as: muscle pain or weakness, numb or cold feeling in your arms and legs, trouble breathing, stomach pain, nausea with vomiting, slow or irregular heart rate, dizziness, or feeling very weak or tired. Get emergency medical help if you have any of these signs of an allergic reaction: hives; difficulty breathing; swelling of your face, lips, tongue, or throat. Call your doctor at once if you have any other serious side effects, such as: stomach pain, blood in your urine, painful urination; feeling short of breath, especially when lying down; swelling or rapid weight gain; pale skin, feeling light-headed, rapid heart rate, trouble concentrating; sudden unusual pain in your hand, arm, or foot; or nausea, stomach pain, low fever, loss of appetite, dark urine, clay-colored stools, jaundice (yellowing of the skin or eyes). Less serious side effects may include: headache; diarrhea, upset Continue reading >>

Glucose-lowering Medicines For Type 2 Diabetes

Glucose-lowering Medicines For Type 2 Diabetes

Background There is an increasing array of medicines available to improve blood glucose control in type 2 diabetes. Finding the best com-bination for an individual patient requires an assessment of the patient’s characteristics and understanding the mechanism of action for each drug. Objective/s The aim of this article is to provide a rational approach for choosing between the various blood glucose-lowering medicines available for treatment of patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Discussion Metformin is the first choice of glucose-lowering medicines for most patients with type 2 diabetes. Sulphonylureas have proven benefits in long-term trials. Insulin is required in patients with symptoms of insulin deficiency. Glucagon-like peptide 1 agonists and sodium-glucose co-transporter 2 inhibitors provide some assistance in weight loss as well as improving blood glucose con-trol. Dipeptidyl peptidase 4 inhibitors provide an alternative to metformin and sulphonylureas, especially when side effects of those drugs limit their use. Re-assessing blood glucose control after an appropriate trial period before deciding on continuing use is appropriate. In recent years, pharmacological options for treating type 2 diabetes have expanded substantially. The place of metformin as the drug of first choice is unquestioned. Sulphonylureas have a long history and their use is supported by outcome data from the UK Prospective Diabetes Study (UKPDS).1 Choosing agents other than metformin or sulphonylureas is more difficult, apart from the use of insulin in patients who are clearly insulin-deficient. Most pharmacological options will reduce glycosylated haemoglobin (HbA1c) by 0.5–1.0%, on average, either as monotherapy, compared to placebo, or in addition to metformin and or a sulphonylure Continue reading >>

The Insulin Analog Aspart: A Safe Alternative In Insulin Allergy

The Insulin Analog Aspart: A Safe Alternative In Insulin Allergy

The introduction of human recombinant insulin has considerably lowered, but not eliminated, adverse reactions to insulin administration. Several reports indicate that human recombinant insulin can also induce IgE- and non–IgE-mediated local or systemic reactions (1,2). However, in most patients with allergy to human recombinant insulin, insulin lispro—a genetically engineered insulin analog (Humalog; Lilly, Indianapolis, IN)—is well tolerated and can be safely used (3,4,5). Although the main immunogenic insulin epitopes remain unchanged in the lispro molecule, it has been suggested that this analog has reduced immunogenicity because of its rapid dissociation in monomers (6). Here we report the case of cutaneous hypersensitivity to human insulin, successfully treated with the human insulin analog aspart (NovoRapid; Novo Nordisk, Bagsværd, Denmark). This rapid-acting insulin analog is produced by recombinant technology that replaces the proline at position 28 on the β-chain of insulin with negatively charged aspartic acid. Insulin aspart exists as examers that rapidly dissociate into monomers and dimers after the subcutaneous injection (7); therefore, it should be less immunogenic than human recombinant insulin. A 45-year-old man was referred to our division for the management of uncontrolled diabetes. Type 2 diabetes had been diagnosed 2 years before and was treated with glyburide and metformin. Recently, non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma was diagnosed, and a combination chemotherapy was started. The use of glucocorticoids worsened glycemic control, and two daily injections of premixed human insulin (30% regular and 70% intermediate-acting) were prescribed. After a few days, the patient noticed local wheal and flare reactions immediately after the injection at the injecti Continue reading >>

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