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All Of The Following Are Symptoms Of Diabetes Except

Symptoms Of Diabetes And Their Association With The Risk And Presence Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes And Their Association With The Risk And Presence Of Diabetes

Findings from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD) Abstract OBJECTIVE—The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists seven symptoms of diabetes; however, it is not known how specific these symptoms are for initial diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. The Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD) examined prevalence of ADA symptoms and their association with diabetes diagnosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—SHIELD is a 5-year observational study of individuals with or at risk for diabetes diagnosis. Following an initial screening phase, follow-up questionnaires were mailed to a stratified random sample of individuals (n = 22,001) with type 1 or type 2 diabetes or at high (three to five risk factors) or low (zero to two risk factors) risk for diabetes. Individuals reported whether they experienced each ADA symptom, as well as symptoms unrelated to diabetes. RESULTS—A total of 15,794 questionnaires were returned (response rate 71.8%). All ADA symptoms were reported more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in low- and high-risk groups (P < 0.0001 for each). Multivariable logistic regression analyses found that each ADA symptom other than irritability was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes, as was erectile/sexual dysfunction. However, 48% of type 1 diabetic and 44% of type 2 diabetic respondents reported no ADA symptom in the previous year. CONCLUSIONS—Occurrence of ADA symptoms alone may not adequately identify those who should be evaluated for type 2 diabetes. Longitudinal data from SHIELD will evaluate whether combinations of symptoms or addition of other symptoms can better identify individuals for evaluation. By 2005 estimates, 7.0% of the U Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Quiz

Diabetes Mellitus Nclex Quiz

This NCLEX diabetes mellitus quiz will test your knowledge on diabetes. Diabetes mellitus is where a patient does not have sufficient amounts of insulin to use the glucose that enters the blood stream. Therefore, the patient experiences hyperglycemia which is damaging to the body. The NCLEX and nursing school lecture exams love to test students on their ability to differentiate between causes, signs and symptoms, patient education, and various treatments for diabetes. This NCLEX quiz will test your ability: Patho of Diabetes Mellitus Causes of Diabetes Mellitus Different types of Diabetes Mellitus Signs and Symptoms of Diabetes Mellitus Complications of Diabetes Mellitus Lecture on Diabetes Mellitus (NOTE: When you hit submit, it will refresh this same page. Scroll down to see your results.) Diabetes Mellitus NCLEX Quiz 1.Which of the following symptoms do NOT present in hyperglycemia? A. Extreme thirst B. Hunger C. Blood glucose <60 mg/dL D. Glycosuria 2. Type 1 diabetics typically have the following clinical characteristics: A. Thin, young with ketones present in the urine B. Overweight, young with no ketones present in the urine C. Thin, adult-aged with ketones present in the urine D. Thin, older adult with glycosuria 3. A patient with diabetes has a morning glucose of 50. The patient is sweaty, cold, and clammy. Which of the following nursing interventions is MOST important? A. Recheck the glucose level B. Give the patient ½ cup (4 oz) of fruit juice C. Call the doctor D. Keep the patient nothing by mouth 4. Which of the following patients is at most risk for Type 2 diabetes? A. A 6 year old girl recovering from a viral infection with a family history of diabetes. B. A 28 year old male with a BMI of 49. C. A 76 year old female with a history of cardiac disease. D. Continue reading >>

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause blood sugar (glucose) to be higher than normal. Many people do not feel symptoms with type 2 diabetes. However, common symptoms do exist and being able to recognize them is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. They may recommend that you be tested for diabetes, which is performed with a basic blood draw. Routine diabetes screening normally starts at age 45. However, it might start earlier if you are: sedentary affected by high blood pressure, now or when you were pregnant from a family with a history of type 2 diabetes from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes at higher risk due to high blood pressure, low good cholesterol levels, or high triglyceride levels If you have diabetes, it can help to understand how your blood sugar levels affect the way you feel. Most common symptoms of diabetes are caused by elevated glucose levels. Frequent or Increased Urination Elevated glucose levels force fluids from your cells. This increases the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. This makes you need to urinate more. It may also eventually make you dehydrated. Thirst As your tissues become dehydrated, you will become thirsty. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa. Fatigue Feeling worn down is another common symptom of diabetes. Glucose is normally one of the body’s main sources of energy. When cells cannot absorb sugar, you can become fatigued or feel exhausted. Blurred Vision In the short term, high glucose levels can cause a swelli Continue reading >>

Diabetes Study Set Flashcards | Quizlet

Diabetes Study Set Flashcards | Quizlet

Which statement is true regarding the difference between type 1 and type 2 diabetes mellitus? A. Type 2 diabetes has decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance. B. Type 2 diabetes has a total dependency on an outside source of insulin. C. Type 1 diabetes typically occurs in older, obese adults. D. Type 1 diabetes can result in hyperosmolar hyperglycemic syndrome (HHS). Type 2 diabetes has decreased insulin secretion and increased insulin resistance. Which finding is the best indication that the patient needs instruction regarding consistent control of her diabetes? A. Fasting serum glucose level is 150 mg/dL. B. Postprandial glucose level is 140 mg/dL. D. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) level is 9%. D. Glycosylated hemoglobin (A1C) level is 9%. The patient has vision problems. What intervention can help the patient independently manage her insulin administration? A. Use an insulin pen, listening to the clicks. B. Have family members prefill syringes for a month ahead of time. C. Ask the physician to change the prescription to oral insulin. D. Mix the basal insulin with rapid-acting insulin in the same syringe. A. Use an insulin pen, listening to the clicks. The patient has a 3:00 AM blood glucose level of 50 mg/dL and a 7:00 AM glucose level of 150 mg/dL. What is the proper explanation of these findings and anticipated intervention? A. Somogyi effect with need for less insulin at night B. Somogyi effect with need for a snack at 3:00 AM C. Dawn phenomenon with need for more insulin in the morning D. Dawn phenomenon with need for less food in the morning Somogyi effect with need for less insulin at night What is the correct teaching regarding oral antidiabetic medications? A. Double the glipizide (Glucotrol) dose if consuming alcohol. B. Hold all antidiab Continue reading >>

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Articles Ontype 2 Diabetes

Diabetes is a life-long disease that affects the way your body handles glucose, a kind of sugar, in your blood. Most people with the condition have type 2. There are about 27 million people in the U.S. with it. Another 86 million have prediabetes: Their blood glucose is not normal, but not high enough to be diabetes yet. Your pancreas makes a hormone called insulin. It's what lets your cells turn glucose from the food you eat into energy. People with type 2 diabetes make insulin, but their cells don't use it as well as they should. Doctors call this insulin resistance. At first, the pancreas makes more insulin to try to get glucose into the cells. But eventually it can't keep up, and the sugar builds up in your blood instead. Usually a combination of things cause type 2 diabetes, including: Genes. Scientists have found different bits of DNA that affect how your body makes insulin. Extra weight. Being overweight or obese can cause insulin resistance, especially if you carry your extra pounds around the middle. Now type 2 diabetes affects kids and teens as well as adults, mainly because of childhood obesity. Metabolic syndrome. People with insulin resistance often have a group of conditions including high blood glucose, extra fat around the waist, high blood pressure, and high cholesterol and triglycerides. Too much glucose from your liver. When your blood sugar is low, your liver makes and sends out glucose. After you eat, your blood sugar goes up, and usually the liver will slow down and store its glucose for later. But some people's livers don't. They keep cranking out sugar. Bad communication between cells. Sometimes cells send the wrong signals or don't pick up messages correctly. When these problems affect how your cells make and use insulin or glucose, a chain reac Continue reading >>

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes Symptoms, (type 1 And Type 2)

Diabetes type 1 and type 2 definition and facts Diabetes is a chronic condition associated with abnormally high levels of sugar (glucose) in the blood. Insulin produced by the pancreas lowers blood glucose. Absence or insufficient production of insulin, or an inability of the body to properly use insulin causes diabetes. The two types of diabetes are referred to as type 1 and type 2. Former names for these conditions were insulin-dependent and non-insulin-dependent diabetes, or juvenile onset and adult onset diabetes. Symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes include increased urine output, excessive thirst, weight loss, hunger, fatigue, skin problems slow healing wounds, yeast infections, and tingling or numbness in the feet or toes. Some of the risk factors for getting diabetes include being overweight or obese, leading a sedentary lifestyle, a family history of diabetes, hypertension (high blood pressure), and low levels of the "good" cholesterol (HDL) and elevated levels of triglycerides in the blood. If you think you may have prediabetes or diabetes contact a health-care professional. Diabetes mellitus is a group of metabolic diseases characterized by high blood sugar (glucose) levels that result from defects in insulin secretion, or its action, or both. Diabetes mellitus, commonly referred to as diabetes (as it will be in this article) was first identified as a disease associated with "sweet urine," and excessive muscle loss in the ancient world. Elevated levels of blood glucose (hyperglycemia) lead to spillage of glucose into the urine, hence the term sweet urine. Normally, blood glucose levels are tightly controlled by insulin, a hormone produced by the pancreas. Insulin lowers the blood glucose level. When the blood glucose elevates (for example, after eating food Continue reading >>

Endocrine Flashcards | Quizlet

Endocrine Flashcards | Quizlet

idiopathic, growth failure seen by end of 1st year of life facial defects such as cleft lip and palate 2 major effects of the thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine T3, and thyroxine T4) increases in overall metabolic rate (60-100% increase) Also can affect cognitive ability and sexual maturity hypothalamus --> decrease TRH --> anterior pituitary --> decrease TSH --> thyroid gland --> increase TH (T3:T4) if problem in thyroid gland then it stops normal negative feedback loop from correcting hypothalamus --> increase TRH --> anterior pituitary --> increase TSH --> thyroid gland --> decrease TH (T3:T4) if problem in thyroid gland then it stops normal negative feedback loop from correcting Toxic multi-nodular goiter (swollen thyroid gland)- iodine deficiency Hypernatremia (Headaches; SALTD skin flushing, anxiety, low grade fever, thirst, death; increased BP) Decreased potassium (muscle weakness, fatigue) The ___ and pituitary form a unit that exert control over many functions of several endocrine glands When growth hormone excess occurs in adulthood or after the epiphyses of the long bones have fused, the condition is referred to as __ In children, a deficiency of __ hormones interferes with linear bone development, resulting in short stature or dwarfism Hypothyroidism is evidenced by an increased metabolic rate, restlessness, irritability, tachycardia, diarrhea, and heat resistance. TRUE OR FALSE? Moon Face, buffalo hump, obesity, amenorrhea, and increased facial hair are manifestations of ____ syndrome Primary adrenal insufficiency, or Addison disease, is caused by destruction of the adrenal gland. TRUE OR FALSE? Endocrine portion of pancreas consists of a cluster of cells called the What type of cells are found in the islets of langerhans Insulin decrease blood sugar by (6 Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms | Diabetes Canada

Signs & Symptoms | Diabetes Canada

Look for special events, expos, programs and services close to home or a mouse-click away. There are many signs and symptoms that can indicate diabetes. Signs and symptoms can include the following: Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection If you have any of these symptoms, it is important to contact your health-care provider right away. Even if you dont have symptoms, if you are 40 or older, you should still get checked. It is important to recognize, however, that many people who have type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. We respond to more than 20,000 requests per year by phone, email, and online chat. We are here to help give you the information and support you need so don't hesitate to contact us today. Diabetes affects children of all ages. Most children who develop diabetes do not have a family history of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes in your child could include: Drinking and going to the bathroom more frequently than usual If you think your child might have diabetes, see a doctor today. Speak with your doctor and ask him or her to test you for diabetes using one of the following tests. The amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is measured in mmol/L. You must not eat or drink anything except water for at least eight hours before this test. A test result of 7.0 mmol/L or greater indicates diabetes. This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 11.0 mmol/L or greater, plus symptoms of diabetes, indicates diabetes. This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 6.5 % or greater (in adults) and in the absence of factors that affect the accuracy of the A1C indicates diabetes. You will be given a special sweetened drink prior to this blood test Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Uncontrolled diabetes can be fatal. It can also lower quality of life. In 2010, diabetes and its complications were responsible for 12 percent of deaths worldwide. Many of these deaths were avoidable. Although diabetes is a chronic condition, it can be managed with lifestyle changes and the right medication. People who do not manage the condition well may develop uncontrolled diabetes, which causes dangerously high blood glucose. This can trigger a cascade of symptoms, ranging from mood changes to organ damage. People with type 1 diabetes, a disease that causes the body to attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, are diagnosed, typically, in childhood. However, as many as a third of adults with the most common type 2 diabetes variant of the disorder, do not know they have it. Without taking measures to treat it, these people can develop uncontrolled diabetes. The following 10 symptoms are signs of uncontrolled diabetes. Anyone experiencing them should consult a doctor promptly. Contents of this article: High blood glucose readings High blood glucose readings are the most obvious symptom of uncontrolled diabetes. As diabetes raises blood sugar levels, many people with diabetes think it is normal to have high blood glucose. Normally, however, diabetes medication and lifestyle changes should bring blood glucose within target ranges. If blood glucose is still uncontrolled, or if it is steadily rising, it may be time for an individual to review their management plan. Frequent infections Diabetes can harm the immune system, making people more prone to infections. A person with diabetes who suddenly gets more infections, or who takes longer to heal from an infection they have had before, should see a doctor. Some of the most common infections associated with diabetes in Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes About 8 million American adults have Type 2 diabetes and many dont know it. And Type 1 diabetes often remains undiagnosed until symptoms become so severe that hospitalization is required. Both of these facts speak to a larger truth: Left untreated, diabetes can cause numerous health complications . Thats why its crucial to know the warning signs and to see a healthcare provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Similarly, those with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may have no symptoms or such mild symptoms that they go unnoticed for quite some time. Still, since some people experience warning signs, its worth familiarizing yourself with the symptoms below: If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: Overweight , younger than 45 and have one or more additional risk factors, such as: African-American, Asian-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, Native American or of Pacific Islander descent A history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or delivering a baby more than 9 pounds If your blood glucose levels are normal, you should be tested about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after that diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes Three types of tests can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes: HbA1C (A1C or glycosylated hemoglobin test) The A1C test can diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. It measures your average bl Continue reading >>

Oxford University Press | Online Resource Centre | Multiple Choice Questions

Oxford University Press | Online Resource Centre | Multiple Choice Questions

Answer the following questions and then press 'Submit' to get your score. Which of the following confirmed values meet the diagnostic threshold for diabetes? c) 2 hour post prandial glucose to 126 mg/dl Which of the following statements is correct? a) Insulin suppresses the activity of glycogen synthase b) Insulin mediates glucose uptake in the brain c) "Prediabetes" is a condition characterized by an increased risk for the future development of type 2 diabetes d) The rise in insulin concentration after meal ingestion is reduced in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetes The risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus include: The pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes includes all the following mechanisms except for: a) Increased glucose production by the liver c) Decreased glucose uptake from the skeletal muscle The test for checking mean plasma glucose concentration over the previous 8-10 weeks is: Which statement best describes the differences between the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a) persons with type 2 diabetes usually require lower doses of insulin than person with type 1 diabetes because they have a milder form of diabetes b) persons with type 1 diabetes rapidly develop chronic complications c) autoimmune factors are involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 but not type 2 diabetes d) persons with type 1 diabetes can increase endogenous insulin production by taking oral hypoglycemic agents Which of the following is not a beneficial effect of exercise in people with diabetes: According to trials on diabetes prevention, high-risk individuals can reduce their risk to develop diabetes by doing the following: b) Consuming a diet high in monounsaturated fats c) Losing 5-7% of body weight through a hypocaloric low fat diet and 30 minutes of daily ac Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

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