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All Of The Following Are Symptoms Of Diabetes Except

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis And Monitoring Of Diabetes

Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes Symptoms, Diagnosis and Monitoring of Diabetes About 8 million American adults have Type 2 diabetes and many dont know it. And Type 1 diabetes often remains undiagnosed until symptoms become so severe that hospitalization is required. Both of these facts speak to a larger truth: Left untreated, diabetes can cause numerous health complications . Thats why its crucial to know the warning signs and to see a healthcare provider regularly for routine wellness screenings. Similarly, those with Type 1 or Type 2 diabetes may have no symptoms or such mild symptoms that they go unnoticed for quite some time. Still, since some people experience warning signs, its worth familiarizing yourself with the symptoms below: If you have any of these symptoms, see your health care provider right away. Diabetes can only be diagnosed by your healthcare provider. Who should be tested for prediabetes and diabetes? The U.S. Department of Health and Human Services recommends that you should be tested if you are: Overweight , younger than 45 and have one or more additional risk factors, such as: African-American, Asian-American, Latino/Hispanic-American, Native American or of Pacific Islander descent A history of gestational diabetes (diabetes during pregnancy) or delivering a baby more than 9 pounds If your blood glucose levels are normal, you should be tested about every three years. If you have prediabetes, you should be checked for diabetes every one to two years after that diagnosis. Tests for Diagnosing Prediabetes and Diabetes Three types of tests can help healthcare providers make a diagnosis of prediabetes and diabetes: HbA1C (A1C or glycosylated hemoglobin test) The A1C test can diagnose prediabetes and diabetes. It measures your average bl Continue reading >>

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 Diabetes

Type 2 diabetes occurs mostly in people aged over 40 years. However, an increasing number of younger people, even children, are being diagnosed with type 2 diabetes. The first-line treatment is diet, weight control and physical activity. If the blood sugar (glucose) level remains high despite these measures then tablets to reduce the blood glucose level are usually advised. Insulin injections are needed in some cases. Other treatments include reducing blood pressure if it is high, lowering high cholesterol levels and also using other measures to reduce the risk of complications. Although diabetes cannot be cured, it can be treated successfully. If a high blood sugar level is brought down to a normal level, your symptoms will ease. You still have some risk of complications in the long term if your blood glucose level remains even mildly high - even if you have no symptoms in the short term. However, studies have shown that people who have better glucose control have fewer complications (such as heart disease or eye problems) compared with those people who have poorer control of their glucose level. Therefore, the main aims of treatment are: To keep your blood glucose level as near normal as possible. To reduce any other risk factors that may increase your risk of developing complications. In particular, to lower your blood pressure if it is high and to keep your blood lipids (cholesterol) low. To detect any complications as early as possible. Treatment can prevent or delay some complications from becoming worse. Type 2 diabetes is usually initially treated by following a healthy diet, losing weight if you are overweight, and having regular physical activity. If lifestyle advice does not control your blood sugar (glucose) levels then medicines are used to help lower your Continue reading >>

Medical Terminology Ch 9: Endocrine & Nervous System

Medical Terminology Ch 9: Endocrine & Nervous System

Abnormal protrusion of eyeballs that may be due to thyrotoxicosis, tumor, or aneurysm Hyperthyroidism that involves growth of the thyroid gland associated with hypersecretion of thyroxine Advanced hypothyroidism in adults causing edema and increased blood pressure Total pituitary impairment that brings about a progressive, general loss of hormonal activity Chronic, organic mental disorder characterized by deterioration of intellectual functioning, apathy, disorientation, speech and gait disturbances Disorder affecting the central nervous system characterized by recurrent seizures Hereditary nervous disorder characterized by bizarre, involuntary, dance-like movements Cranial enlargement caused by accumulation of fluid within the ventricles of the brain Progressive degenerative disease of the CNS that causes muscular weakness, visual disturbance, and neurologic disability Partial or complete loss of motor function; paralysis Inflammation of the gray matter of the spinal cord caused by a virus often resulting in spinal and muscle deformity, and paralysis Severe pain in the leg along the course of a nerve which travels from the hip to the foot Eruption of acute, inflammatory, herpetic vesicles on the trunk of the body along a peripheral nerve Radiographic technique that uses electromagnetic energy to produce images of the body Imaging procedure that measures levels of radioactivity in the thyroid gland following administration of radioactive iodine Radiographic procedure that uses a narrow beam of x-rays which rotates in a full arc around the patient to image the body in cross-sectional slices Oral administration or injection of synthetic hormones to replace a hormone deficiency Increase in the size of an organ or tissue Which of the following glands is located on the fron Continue reading >>

Endocrine Flashcards | Quizlet

Endocrine Flashcards | Quizlet

idiopathic, growth failure seen by end of 1st year of life facial defects such as cleft lip and palate 2 major effects of the thyroid hormones (triiodothyronine T3, and thyroxine T4) increases in overall metabolic rate (60-100% increase) Also can affect cognitive ability and sexual maturity hypothalamus --> decrease TRH --> anterior pituitary --> decrease TSH --> thyroid gland --> increase TH (T3:T4) if problem in thyroid gland then it stops normal negative feedback loop from correcting hypothalamus --> increase TRH --> anterior pituitary --> increase TSH --> thyroid gland --> decrease TH (T3:T4) if problem in thyroid gland then it stops normal negative feedback loop from correcting Toxic multi-nodular goiter (swollen thyroid gland)- iodine deficiency Hypernatremia (Headaches; SALTD skin flushing, anxiety, low grade fever, thirst, death; increased BP) Decreased potassium (muscle weakness, fatigue) The ___ and pituitary form a unit that exert control over many functions of several endocrine glands When growth hormone excess occurs in adulthood or after the epiphyses of the long bones have fused, the condition is referred to as __ In children, a deficiency of __ hormones interferes with linear bone development, resulting in short stature or dwarfism Hypothyroidism is evidenced by an increased metabolic rate, restlessness, irritability, tachycardia, diarrhea, and heat resistance. TRUE OR FALSE? Moon Face, buffalo hump, obesity, amenorrhea, and increased facial hair are manifestations of ____ syndrome Primary adrenal insufficiency, or Addison disease, is caused by destruction of the adrenal gland. TRUE OR FALSE? Endocrine portion of pancreas consists of a cluster of cells called the What type of cells are found in the islets of langerhans Insulin decrease blood sugar by (6 Continue reading >>

Oxford University Press | Online Resource Centre | Multiple Choice Questions

Oxford University Press | Online Resource Centre | Multiple Choice Questions

Answer the following questions and then press 'Submit' to get your score. Which of the following confirmed values meet the diagnostic threshold for diabetes? c) 2 hour post prandial glucose to 126 mg/dl Which of the following statements is correct? a) Insulin suppresses the activity of glycogen synthase b) Insulin mediates glucose uptake in the brain c) "Prediabetes" is a condition characterized by an increased risk for the future development of type 2 diabetes d) The rise in insulin concentration after meal ingestion is reduced in type 1 but not in type 2 diabetes The risk factors for type 2 diabetes mellitus include: The pathogenesis of hyperglycemia in type 2 diabetes includes all the following mechanisms except for: a) Increased glucose production by the liver c) Decreased glucose uptake from the skeletal muscle The test for checking mean plasma glucose concentration over the previous 8-10 weeks is: Which statement best describes the differences between the characteristics of type 1 and type 2 diabetes: a) persons with type 2 diabetes usually require lower doses of insulin than person with type 1 diabetes because they have a milder form of diabetes b) persons with type 1 diabetes rapidly develop chronic complications c) autoimmune factors are involved in the pathogenesis of type 1 but not type 2 diabetes d) persons with type 1 diabetes can increase endogenous insulin production by taking oral hypoglycemic agents Which of the following is not a beneficial effect of exercise in people with diabetes: According to trials on diabetes prevention, high-risk individuals can reduce their risk to develop diabetes by doing the following: b) Consuming a diet high in monounsaturated fats c) Losing 5-7% of body weight through a hypocaloric low fat diet and 30 minutes of daily ac Continue reading >>

Chapter 23 Flashcards | Quizlet

Chapter 23 Flashcards | Quizlet

the pancreas produces enough insulin, but the body cannot utilize it effectively. A decrease in adrenal hormone production will result in all of the following, EXCEPT: The endocrine system comprises a network of ___________ that produce and secrete chemical messengers called ____________. Secretion of the parathyroid hormone is regulated by blood levels of: The adrenal medulla secretes norepinephrine following stimulation from the: Prior to administering 50% dextrose (D50) via IV push, it is MOST important to: ensure that the IV line is patent and freely flowing. A 30-year-old woman presents with 3 days of generalized weakness, dizziness, and excessive urination. She is conscious but restless, and she tells you that she is extremely thirsty. Her blood pressure is 96/66 mm Hg, her pulse is 110 beats/min and full, and her respirations are increased and somewhat deep. On the basis of this patient's clinical presentation, she will MOST likely require oxygen and: Thirty minutes of hypoglycemia in a patient: is more dangerous than an equivalent period of hyperglycemia. Type 1 diabetes that is secondary to an autoimmune disorder occurs when: the body builds up antibodies that destroy the islets of Langerhans. You are dispatched to a residence for an elderly woman who is "sick." When you arrive and assess her, you note that she is responsive to pain only and has hot, moist skin and rapid, shallow respirations. You find prednisone, Paxil, and multivitamins on her nightstand. Further assessment of this patient will MOST likely reveal: hypoglycemia, hypotension, and ECG evidence of hyperkalemia. When the body's metabolic rate decreases: The release of glucagon into the bloodstream stimulates: the liver to convert glycogen to glucose. Which of the following is an example of endocr Continue reading >>

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

The Infant And Toddler With Diabetes: Challenges Of Diagnosis And Management

Go to: Infants and toddlers comprise a small minority of individuals with type 1 diabetes. However, epidemiological data provide evidence of a trend towards diagnosis at a younger age. These very young children pose significant challenges to both the health care professionals involved in their care as well as to their families. At diagnosis, younger children often do not present with classical symptoms of diabetes. Unless health professionals remain alert to the possibility of diabetes being the underlying cause of a child’s illness, the diagnosis may be missed. Once the diabetes has been diagnosed, the major challenge is to set up a treatment regimen that is both reasonable and realistic; in the youngest children, the goal of very tight metabolic control may expose them to episodes of severe hypoglycemia which may lead to subtle cognitive impairments later in life. The therapeutic regimen must balance the naturally erratic eating and exercise patterns of very young children with the need to maintain adequate metabolic control. Setting a blood glucose target range of 6 to 12 mmol/L usually allows this to be accomplished. Diabetes during early childhood creates a psychosocial challenge to the families of these children. Successful management of infants and toddlers with diabetes depends on a well functioning and educated family, the availability of diabetes health care team experienced in the treatment of these youngsters, and the involvement of the extended family, child care personnel and others who play a role in their daily care. Keywords: Infants, Metabolic control, Toddlers, Type I diabetes Children under three to five years of age with type I diabetes comprise a small proportion of all those with this disorder: less than 1% of all children are diagnosed in the f Continue reading >>

Symptoms

Symptoms

Print Overview Diabetes mellitus refers to a group of diseases that affect how your body uses blood sugar (glucose). Glucose is vital to your health because it's an important source of energy for the cells that make up your muscles and tissues. It's also your brain's main source of fuel. If you have diabetes, no matter what type, it means you have too much glucose in your blood, although the causes may differ. Too much glucose can lead to serious health problems. Chronic diabetes conditions include type 1 diabetes and type 2 diabetes. Potentially reversible diabetes conditions include prediabetes — when your blood sugar levels are higher than normal, but not high enough to be classified as diabetes — and gestational diabetes, which occurs during pregnancy but may resolve after the baby is delivered. Diabetes symptoms vary depending on how much your blood sugar is elevated. Some people, especially those with prediabetes or type 2 diabetes, may not experience symptoms initially. In type 1 diabetes, symptoms tend to come on quickly and be more severe. Some of the signs and symptoms of type 1 and type 2 diabetes are: Increased thirst Frequent urination Extreme hunger Unexplained weight loss Presence of ketones in the urine (ketones are a byproduct of the breakdown of muscle and fat that happens when there's not enough available insulin) Fatigue Irritability Blurred vision Slow-healing sores Frequent infections, such as gums or skin infections and vaginal infections Although type 1 diabetes can develop at any age, it typically appears during childhood or adolescence. Type 2 diabetes, the more common type, can develop at any age, though it's more common in people older than 40. When to see a doctor If you suspect you or your child may have diabetes. If you notice any poss Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes And Their Association With The Risk And Presence Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes And Their Association With The Risk And Presence Of Diabetes

Findings from the Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD) Abstract OBJECTIVE—The American Diabetes Association (ADA) lists seven symptoms of diabetes; however, it is not known how specific these symptoms are for initial diagnosis of type 2 diabetes. The Study to Help Improve Early evaluation and management of risk factors Leading to Diabetes (SHIELD) examined prevalence of ADA symptoms and their association with diabetes diagnosis. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—SHIELD is a 5-year observational study of individuals with or at risk for diabetes diagnosis. Following an initial screening phase, follow-up questionnaires were mailed to a stratified random sample of individuals (n = 22,001) with type 1 or type 2 diabetes or at high (three to five risk factors) or low (zero to two risk factors) risk for diabetes. Individuals reported whether they experienced each ADA symptom, as well as symptoms unrelated to diabetes. RESULTS—A total of 15,794 questionnaires were returned (response rate 71.8%). All ADA symptoms were reported more frequently in type 2 diabetes than in low- and high-risk groups (P < 0.0001 for each). Multivariable logistic regression analyses found that each ADA symptom other than irritability was significantly associated with type 2 diabetes, as was erectile/sexual dysfunction. However, 48% of type 1 diabetic and 44% of type 2 diabetic respondents reported no ADA symptom in the previous year. CONCLUSIONS—Occurrence of ADA symptoms alone may not adequately identify those who should be evaluated for type 2 diabetes. Longitudinal data from SHIELD will evaluate whether combinations of symptoms or addition of other symptoms can better identify individuals for evaluation. By 2005 estimates, 7.0% of the U Continue reading >>

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes Mellitus Type 2

Diabetes mellitus type 2 (also known as type 2 diabetes) is a long-term metabolic disorder that is characterized by high blood sugar, insulin resistance, and relative lack of insulin.[6] Common symptoms include increased thirst, frequent urination, and unexplained weight loss.[3] Symptoms may also include increased hunger, feeling tired, and sores that do not heal.[3] Often symptoms come on slowly.[6] Long-term complications from high blood sugar include heart disease, strokes, diabetic retinopathy which can result in blindness, kidney failure, and poor blood flow in the limbs which may lead to amputations.[1] The sudden onset of hyperosmolar hyperglycemic state may occur; however, ketoacidosis is uncommon.[4][5] Type 2 diabetes primarily occurs as a result of obesity and lack of exercise.[1] Some people are more genetically at risk than others.[6] Type 2 diabetes makes up about 90% of cases of diabetes, with the other 10% due primarily to diabetes mellitus type 1 and gestational diabetes.[1] In diabetes mellitus type 1 there is a lower total level of insulin to control blood glucose, due to an autoimmune induced loss of insulin-producing beta cells in the pancreas.[12][13] Diagnosis of diabetes is by blood tests such as fasting plasma glucose, oral glucose tolerance test, or glycated hemoglobin (A1C).[3] Type 2 diabetes is partly preventable by staying a normal weight, exercising regularly, and eating properly.[1] Treatment involves exercise and dietary changes.[1] If blood sugar levels are not adequately lowered, the medication metformin is typically recommended.[7][14] Many people may eventually also require insulin injections.[9] In those on insulin, routinely checking blood sugar levels is advised; however, this may not be needed in those taking pills.[15] Bariatri Continue reading >>

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Ten Signs Of Uncontrolled Diabetes

Uncontrolled diabetes can be fatal. It can also lower quality of life. In 2010, diabetes and its complications were responsible for 12 percent of deaths worldwide. Many of these deaths were avoidable. Although diabetes is a chronic condition, it can be managed with lifestyle changes and the right medication. People who do not manage the condition well may develop uncontrolled diabetes, which causes dangerously high blood glucose. This can trigger a cascade of symptoms, ranging from mood changes to organ damage. People with type 1 diabetes, a disease that causes the body to attack insulin-producing cells in the pancreas, are diagnosed, typically, in childhood. However, as many as a third of adults with the most common type 2 diabetes variant of the disorder, do not know they have it. Without taking measures to treat it, these people can develop uncontrolled diabetes. The following 10 symptoms are signs of uncontrolled diabetes. Anyone experiencing them should consult a doctor promptly. Contents of this article: High blood glucose readings High blood glucose readings are the most obvious symptom of uncontrolled diabetes. As diabetes raises blood sugar levels, many people with diabetes think it is normal to have high blood glucose. Normally, however, diabetes medication and lifestyle changes should bring blood glucose within target ranges. If blood glucose is still uncontrolled, or if it is steadily rising, it may be time for an individual to review their management plan. Frequent infections Diabetes can harm the immune system, making people more prone to infections. A person with diabetes who suddenly gets more infections, or who takes longer to heal from an infection they have had before, should see a doctor. Some of the most common infections associated with diabetes in Continue reading >>

Signs & Symptoms | Diabetes Canada

Signs & Symptoms | Diabetes Canada

Look for special events, expos, programs and services close to home or a mouse-click away. There are many signs and symptoms that can indicate diabetes. Signs and symptoms can include the following: Tingling or numbness in the hands or feet Trouble getting or maintaining an erection If you have any of these symptoms, it is important to contact your health-care provider right away. Even if you dont have symptoms, if you are 40 or older, you should still get checked. It is important to recognize, however, that many people who have type 2 diabetes may display no symptoms. We respond to more than 20,000 requests per year by phone, email, and online chat. We are here to help give you the information and support you need so don't hesitate to contact us today. Diabetes affects children of all ages. Most children who develop diabetes do not have a family history of diabetes. Symptoms of diabetes in your child could include: Drinking and going to the bathroom more frequently than usual If you think your child might have diabetes, see a doctor today. Speak with your doctor and ask him or her to test you for diabetes using one of the following tests. The amount of glucose (sugar) in your blood is measured in mmol/L. You must not eat or drink anything except water for at least eight hours before this test. A test result of 7.0 mmol/L or greater indicates diabetes. This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 11.0 mmol/L or greater, plus symptoms of diabetes, indicates diabetes. This test may be done at any time, regardless of when you last ate. A test result of 6.5 % or greater (in adults) and in the absence of factors that affect the accuracy of the A1C indicates diabetes. You will be given a special sweetened drink prior to this blood test Continue reading >>

Diabetes Practice Questions

Diabetes Practice Questions

1. The risk factors for type 1 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Diet b. Genetic c. Autoimmune d. Environmental 2. Type 2 diabetes accounts for approximately what percentage of all cases of diabetes in adults? a. 55%-60% b. 35%-40% c. 90-95% d. 25-30% 3. Risk factors for type 2 diabetes include all of the following except: a. Advanced age b. Obesity c. Smoking d. Physical inactivity 4. What percentage of women with gestational diabetes is diagnosed with type 2 diabetes following pregnancy? a. 25%-30% b. 5%-10% c. <5% d. 20%-25% 5. Untreated diabetes may result in all of the following except: a. Blindness b. Cardiovascular disease c. Kidney disease d. Tinnitus 6. Prediabetes is associated with all of the following except: a. Increased risk of developing type 2 diabetes b. Impaired glucose tolerance c. Increased risk of heart disease and stroke d. Increased risk of developing type 1 diabetes 7. Diabetics are at increased risk of heart disease if they also: a. Smoke b. Have high HDL cholesterol levels c. Take aspirin d. Consume a high-fiber diet 8. Blood sugar is well controlled when Hemoglobin A1C is: a. Below 7% b. Between 12%-15% c. Less than 180 mg/dL d. Between 90 and 130 mg/dL 9. Excessive thirst and volume of very dilute urine may be symptoms of: a. Urinary tract infection b. Diabetes insipidus c. Viral gastroenteritis d. Hypoglycemia 10. Among female children and adolescents, the first sign of type 1 diabetes may be: a. Rapid weight gain b. Constipation c. Genital candidiasis d. Insomnia 11. Untreated hyperglycemia may lead to all of the following complications except: a. Hyperosmolar syndrome b Vitiligo c. Diabetic ketoacidosis d. Coma 12. Hyperinsulinemia may be caused by all of the following except: a. An insulinoma b. Nesidioblastosis c. Insulin Continue reading >>

Symptoms Of Diabetes

Symptoms Of Diabetes

It is possible to have diabetes with only very mild symptoms or without developing any symptoms at all. Such cases can leave some people with diabetes unaware of the condition and undiagnosed. This happens in around half of people with type 2 diabetes.1,2 A condition known as prediabetes that often leads to type 2 diabetes also produces no symptoms. Type 2 diabetes and its symptoms develop slowly.3 Type 1 diabetes can go unnoticed but is less likely to do so. Some of its symptoms listed below can come on abruptly and be accompanied by nausea, vomiting or stomach pains.2-4 It is important to see a doctor if there is any suspicion of diabetes or if any of the below signs and symptoms are present - prompt diagnosis and management lowers the likelihood of serious complications.5 The most common symptoms are related to hyperglycemia (high blood sugar levels), especially the classic symptoms of diabetes: frequent urination and thirst. Fatigue related to dehydration and eating problems can also be related to high blood sugars.5,6 The International Diabetes Foundation highlight four symptoms that should prompt someone to get checked for diabetes as soon as possible:1 Common symptoms of diabetes The most common signs and symptoms of diabetes are: Frequent urination Have you been going to the bathroom to urinate more often recently? Do you notice that you spend most of the day going to the toilet? When there is too much glucose (sugar) in your blood you will urinate more often. If your insulin is ineffective, or not there at all, your kidneys cannot filter the glucose back into the blood. The kidneys will take water from your blood in order to dilute the glucose - which in turn fills up your bladder. Disproportionate thirst If you are urinating more than usual, you will need to r Continue reading >>

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Recognizing Type 2 Diabetes Symptoms

Type 2 diabetes is a chronic disease that can cause blood sugar (glucose) to be higher than normal. Many people do not feel symptoms with type 2 diabetes. However, common symptoms do exist and being able to recognize them is important. Most symptoms of type 2 diabetes occur when blood sugar levels are abnormally high. The most common symptoms of type 2 diabetes include: If you experience any of these symptoms on a regular basis, talk to your doctor. They may recommend that you be tested for diabetes, which is performed with a basic blood draw. Routine diabetes screening normally starts at age 45. However, it might start earlier if you are: sedentary affected by high blood pressure, now or when you were pregnant from a family with a history of type 2 diabetes from an ethnic background that has a higher risk of type 2 diabetes at higher risk due to high blood pressure, low good cholesterol levels, or high triglyceride levels If you have diabetes, it can help to understand how your blood sugar levels affect the way you feel. Most common symptoms of diabetes are caused by elevated glucose levels. Frequent or Increased Urination Elevated glucose levels force fluids from your cells. This increases the amount of fluid delivered to the kidneys. This makes you need to urinate more. It may also eventually make you dehydrated. Thirst As your tissues become dehydrated, you will become thirsty. Increased thirst is another common diabetes symptom. The more you urinate, the more you need to drink, and vice versa. Fatigue Feeling worn down is another common symptom of diabetes. Glucose is normally one of the body’s main sources of energy. When cells cannot absorb sugar, you can become fatigued or feel exhausted. Blurred Vision In the short term, high glucose levels can cause a swelli Continue reading >>

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